The Global Product Stewardship Council

Annual General Meeting and Call for Office-holders and other Executive Committee Positions

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 2:16 pm, December 1st, 2016

The Global Product Stewardship Council is holding its Annual General Meeting via webconference at 0900 Australian Eastern Daylight Time in Australia on Thursday, 15 December 2016. Due to time zone differences, this equates to the following:

  • 2200 on Wednesday, 14 December in London
  • 1700 on Wednesday, 14 in Boston
  • 1600 on Wednesday, 14 in Minneapolis
  • 1400 on Wednesday, 14 in Vancouver

 

Email admin@globalpsc.net to register for participation in the AGM. While multiple representatives of member organisations are welcome to participate in the AGM, each organisation is entitled to one vote only. Participation details will be emailed to you once registered.

Items to be addressed during the AGM include:

  • Approve minutes of last AGM
  • President’s report on GlobalPSC activities during the last preceding financial year
  • Member feedback / Q&A on GlobalPSC member services
  • Financial statement
  • Election of office-holders and other Executive Committee Positions

 

Call for Office-holders and other Executive Committee Positions

In accordance with the Rules of the Global Product Stewardship Council, nominations for office-holders and other Executive Committee positions are now open. Only paid-up full GlobalPSC members may nominate a candidate, or be nominated as a candidate.

 

The term of office of all currently elected GlobalPSC officers and Executive Committee members will expire at the conclusion of the AGM.  Nominations are called for the following positions (current office-holders are listed), to be in effect for one year:

The Executive Committee currently comprises the office-holders plus Kylie Hughes, Scott Cassel, Garth Hickle, Mark Kurschner and Ed Cordner. With the exception of David Perchard, whose service since the foundation of the GlobalPSC is greatly appreciated, all current office-holders and Executive Committee members have opted to run for re-election, as allowed under GlobalPSC Rules.

Nominations for office-holders and committee members must be made in writing, signed by 2 members of the GlobalPSC and accompanied by the written consent of the candidate. Candidates will be required to provide a recent high-resolution digital photograph and a statement of no more than 100 words in support of their candidature.

Nominations should be emailed to russ@globalpsc.net by 12 December 2016.

 

GlobalPSC Member – Lorax Compliance

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 3:57 pm, November 18th, 2016

lorax-logo-shaded-transparent-2048x2048

Lorax Compliance is a leading provider of global product environmental compliance solutions comprising market-leading software, data provision services and practical down-to-earth regulatory advice and consulting.

Lorax Compliance delivers cloud-based Environmental Compliance Software and Services to companies who need to comply with local, national and global Extended Producer Responsibility waste directives concerning Packaging, WEEE and Batteries.

By offering turnkey compliance solutions, Lorax Compliance automates the regulatory systems and business processes of its customers, through the provision of the best software tools, the most robust data and regulatory know-how. Lorax Compliance’s mission is to assist customers to reduce their compliance risks and to manage the escalating costs of worldwide environmental compliance.

Contact details:

Website

Email: info@loraxcompliance.com

Twitter

LinkedIn 

 

2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 6:08 pm, November 13th, 2016

 2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing

Innovation Campus, Wollongong University, Australia


 

1 and 2 December 2016, 8.30am – 6.30pm

Registration is free and available here

 

The GlobalPSC is co-hosting Day 1 of the 2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing event in conjunction with the UNSW Centre for Sustainable Materials Research & Technology (SMaRT@UNSW).

Day 1 Overview

This interactive event will delve into the interactions between increasingly complex products desired by consumers and product stewardship, including recycling, that is increasingly expected of producers.

Environmentally-friendly technologies and products, like solar panels, organic cotton garments, bamboo flooring or additive-free foods are important. But even greater environmental and economic benefits can be generated by ‘greening’ the industrial processes that deliver the materials, components and products our mass, global markets demand. This session focuses on the many new opportunities to leverage high temperature reactions to transform even complex waste streams in the production of a new generation of ‘green materials’. By redirecting waste, as a valuable resource, back into our industrial processes we can transform it in the production of previously unimaginable value-added materials and products; that is, truly green materials.

Extended producer responsibility (EPR) was originally intended to reduce environmental impacts of products (primarily through redesign) by shifting physical and/or financial responsibility of post-consumer products to producers. EPR almost always has a regulatory underpinning, while the related concept of product stewardship may be voluntary or regulatory. Although product stewardship addresses full life-cycle impacts of products and their use by consumers, product stewardship and EPR programs have traditionally focused on recycling and material recovery.

Efforts to reduce environmental impacts across supply and recovery chains can be affected by the very processes used in green manufacturing. For example, green manufacturing can result in products without existing markets for recovered materials and are therefore not effectively captured by ‘traditional’ models of product stewardship and EPR. Producers are also increasingly being held accountable for responsibly managing products that do not have significant redesign, reuse or recycling options, such as household-generated ‘sharps’ and unwanted medicines.

Day 1 will explore these complex interactions and trade-offs with notable speakers and feature audience interaction to create a framework for how policies and practices are prioritised in order to produce optimal social, economic and environmental benefits.

 

2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 6:05 pm, November 13th, 2016

iStock_000017122847Small-mic-at-conference

2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing

Innovation Campus, Wollongong University, Australia


 

1 and 2 December 2016, 8.30am – 6.30pm

Registration is free and available here

The GlobalPSC is co-hosting Day 1 of the 2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing event in conjunction with the UNSW Centre for Sustainable Materials Research & Technology (SMaRT@UNSW).

Day 1 Overview

This interactive event will delve into the interactions between increasingly complex products desired by consumers and product stewardship, including recycling, that is increasingly expected of producers.

Environmentally-friendly technologies and products, like solar panels, organic cotton garments, bamboo flooring or additive-free foods are important. But even greater environmental and economic benefits can be generated by ‘greening’ the industrial processes that deliver the materials, components and products our mass, global markets demand. This session focuses on the many new opportunities to leverage high temperature reactions to transform even complex waste streams in the production of a new generation of ‘green materials’. By redirecting waste, as a valuable resource, back into our industrial processes we can transform it in the production of previously unimaginable value-added materials and products; that is, truly green materials.

Extended producer responsibility (EPR) was originally intended to reduce environmental impacts of products (primarily through redesign) by shifting physical and/or financial responsibility of post-consumer products to producers. EPR almost always has a regulatory underpinning, while the related concept of product stewardship may be voluntary or regulatory. Although product stewardship addresses full life-cycle impacts of products and their use by consumers, product stewardship and EPR programs have traditionally focused on recycling and material recovery.

Efforts to reduce environmental impacts across supply and recovery chains can be affected by the very processes used in green manufacturing. For example, green manufacturing can result in products without existing markets for recovered materials and are therefore not effectively captured by ‘traditional’ models of product stewardship and EPR. Producers are also increasingly being held accountable for responsibly managing products that do not have significant redesign, reuse or recycling options, such as household-generated ‘sharps’ and unwanted medicines.

Day 1 will explore these complex interactions and trade-offs with notable speakers and feature audience interaction to create a framework for how policies and practices are prioritised in order to produce optimal social, economic and environmental benefits.

 

GlobalPSC News – October 2016

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 9:27 pm, October 31st, 2016

Message from the CEO

Our recent activities have reinforced not only the maturity and diversity of a broad range of international product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs, but their potential for new and improved efforts and increased efficiency.

At the recent International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) Congress in Novi Sad, Serbia, I provided an overview of global trends and participated in discussions on good governance and EPR in conjunction with the OECD, European Commission and Estonian and Portuguese Ministries for Environment. Several sessions were moderated by GlobalPSC Advisory Group member Joachim Quoden, and reflected a great deal of interest from participants not normally active in product stewardship and EPR.

Novi Sad also saw the official launch of the OECD’s updated guidelines on EPR, which provide a solid overview of product stewardship and EPR programs and frameworks with which to judge and improve their effectiveness.

img_2175

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Börkey, Principal Administrator – Environment Directorate of the OECD, officially launches the OECD’s updated guidelines on EPR.

In conjunction with the trip, I was fortunate to have a range of site visits and meetings with GlobalPSC members and other parties interested on current and emerging issues.

Visits in the UK featured several of our members, including Perchards and site visits of electronics reuse and recycling operations with ITR Global.

Meetings in Paris included French EPR systems for sharps (DASTRI), packaging (Eco-Emballages and Adelphe), electronics (Eco-systemes) and unwanted medicines (Cyclamed) as well as the OECD and the French EPR Commission.

I would personally like to thank all the senior representatives of these organisations that gave their time so freely. We’re writing up highlights and reviewing them with the participants for accuracy in order to make them available for GlobalPSC members.

As soon as we can, we’ll keep you posted on several new projects that we can’t wait to share and provide an update on EPR implementation in Chile via our Chilean member Valoryza. GlobalPSC members will be receiving members-only news updates via email and Twitter.

 

TIC Group Opens Australia’s First Automated Mattress Recycling Facility

ticmattressrecycling_1stcutter_cr

 

TIC Group recently opened Australia’s first automated mattress recycling facility in Melbourne. The facility uses state-of-the-art technology developed in the Netherlands and deconstructs mattresses with recovery and recycling rates of up to 85% (and an objective of increasing this rate to 100%). For a video of launch highlights, please click on the article title above.

A second facility is being commissioned in the neighboring state of New South Wales that will be operational in 2017.

TIC Group’s efforts are intended to address the roughly one million mattresses ending up in landfill each year in Australia. Stacked on top of each other, that’s enough mattresses to reach the International Space Station.

TIC Group has partnered with social enterprise group Soft Landing to collect the mattresses from councils, transfer stations, retailers, hotels and hospitals.

 

tic_launch_group_cr

 

(L-R: Rob Millard, CEO of Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group; Hon Lily D’Ambrosio MP, Victorian Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change; Michael Warren, Managing Director of TIC Group Mattress Recycling; Stan Krpan, CEO of Sustainability Victoria)

Photos and supporting information provided by TIC Group via Equilibrium.

 

TIC Group Opens Australia’s First Automated Mattress Recycling Facility

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 8:13 pm, October 31st, 2016

ticmattressrecycling_1stcutter_cr

TIC Group recently opened Australia’s first automated mattress recycling facility in Melbourne. The facility uses state-of-the-art technology developed in the Netherlands and deconstructs mattresses with recovery and recycling rates of up to 85% (and an objective of increasing this rate to 100%).

A second facility is being commissioned in the neighboring state of New South Wales that will be operational in 2017.

TIC Group’s efforts are intended to address the roughly one million mattresses ending up in landfill each year in Australia. Stacked on top of each other, that’s enough mattresses to reach the International Space Station.

TIC Group has partnered with social enterprise group Soft Landing to collect the mattresses from councils, transfer stations, retailers, hotels and hospitals.

Highlights from the launch are provided below.

 

tic_launch_group_cr

(L-R: Rob Millard, CEO of Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group; Hon Lily D’Ambrosio MP, Victorian Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change; Michael Warren, Managing Director of TIC Group Mattress Recycling; Stan Krpan, CEO of Sustainability Victoria)

Photos and supporting information provided by TIC Group via Equilibrium.

 

Webinar: Recycler and Waste Hauler Perspectives on EPR for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 7:52 pm, October 12th, 2016

The Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) is hosting a webinar of recycler and waste hauler perspectives on extended producer responsibility (EPR) for packaging.

The webinar will take place 27 October, 2016 from 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm EDT. 

The US recycling system has experienced a noticeable shift in the past few decades as the waste management and recycling industries have become increasingly privatized. Because of this change, waste and recycling systems often function as contractual agreements between haulers and recyclers with municipalities or residents. In contrast to this system, other countries – which operate under an EPR structure – rely on a central body to coordinate the recycling network, increasing efficiency and recovery. A shift in the US to EPR for consumer packaging would change the way the current contractual arrangements with recyclers and waste haulers are structured. Could the US shift to an EPR system where consumer packaging manufacturers manage and fund the recycling system? Would this change be for the better? Could it provide stability during market downturns and simplify system economics? Who would ultimately own recycled material, and how would a shift in ownership change economic dynamics?

Using the British Columbia system as a case study, expert speakers will explore these questions and more during the third part of PSI’s packaging webinar series.

 

Speakers:

  • Daniel Lantz, Green by Nature EPR
  • Deanne Stephenson, Cascades Recovery
  • Frank Mainella, Smithrite

Moderated by Scott Cassel, PSI

 

Registration link:

Register through PSI.

When: Thursday, October 27
2:00pm – 3:30pm EST
Where: United States
Contact: Suzy Whalen
suzy@productstewardship.us
+1 617 236-8293

Child Car Safety Seats – What a Valuable Waste!

Posted by GlobalPSC in Guest Blogs at 5:12 am, October 3rd, 2016

Sitting and gathering dust in a garage and waiting for the right time to pass on your used child car safety seat to a friend or relative may soon be a thing of the past.

Child car safety seats that have been involved in an accident or have been mistreated could result in damage to a number of the key safety components. Continuous exposure to heat and sunlight, something Australia’s climate serves up best, could also degrade the plastic structure and other important parts.

It has been found that the average consumer has little knowledge about the existence of recommended expiry dates and the continuingly updated Australian Standards applied to the manufacture of child car safety seats – which in turn has an impact on the suitability of seats to protect children and infants over a period of time.

Removing potentially unsafe or worn or damaged child car safety seats from the market will not only protect children and infants, but could provide an opportunity to responsibly divert these products from landfill and implement an efficient resource recovery and recycling program.

Without a means to effectively remove child car safety seats from the public domain, expired and damaged seats may remain in circulation. They could be offered for sale in online stores such as Gumtree and eBay, illegally dumped on the side of a road or removed from kerbside hard rubbish collections to only be reused again.

There are currently no general programs or schemes within Australia to enable parents to responsibly dispose of and/or recycle child car safety seats. With a growing population and demand for new products, the cost to Governments and communities for the collection and disposal of child car safety seats will only increase.

Setting up a product stewardship and recycling program presents an opportunity to reduce the end-of-life child car safety seats being reused, sold or ending up in landfills which is what Equilibrium, an Australian based sustainability consulting and management company, is hoping to achieve.

Equilibrium will be bringing together a number of key stakeholders from product importers and manufacturers, retailers, automotive clubs and recyclers in early October 2016 to explore how a voluntary product stewardship program might be established to manage the whole of life cycle of a child car safety seat and significantly increase resource recovery and recycling as a result of providing an avenue to return and recycle end-of-life systems.

 

Content provided by Equilibrium

Photo provided by Infasecure

GlobalPSC News – August 2016

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 10:48 pm, August 31st, 2016

Message from the CEO

I’m regularly reminded of the practical lessons that can be discerned from the range of international product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs on offer and from colleagues with whom we’ve worked closely over the years.

The GlobalPSC has recently assisted some of our oldest members as well as some of our newest members in applied research on international programs and tailoring international experience to the circumstances of different countries. The results have been reflected in staff briefings, boardroom briefings and detailed background research and discussion papers for specific industries. Timezone differences and lengthy discussions have resulted in some early mornings and late nights as well as an appreciation for internet-based conferencing capability and long-distance phone plans. Throughout it all, we have benefitted from the cooperation of program experts (including a variety of our members) that have graciously made their time and insights available to the GlobalPSC and our members.

Some of the issues flagged during our first major event, the International Product Stewardship Summit 2010, remain, including balancing commercial risks and opportunities, addressing free riders, trying to ensure transparency and accountability and challenging existing perceptions. Ability to adapt over time to technological changes remains a vexing issue for many programs. The OECD’s updated guidelines on EPR have further illustrated the value in gaining an objective understanding of program strengths, weaknesses and the circumstances that contribute to the success (or otherwise) of the multitude of product stewardship and EPR programs.

Our network coverage continues to expand across a multitude of locales and product types. We’ve been doing some research on Latin American EPR initiatives for batteries and waste electronics and gained a new Chilean member. In a few weeks, we’ll be joining discussions in Serbia on good governance and EPR in conjunction with the OECD, European Commission and Estonian and Portuguese Ministries for Environment; GlobalPSC Advisory Group member Joachim Quoden is moderating the discussions at the International Solid Waste Association Congress. We’ll be doing site visits with members and EPR programs in the UK and France. We’ve also been expanding our outreach and activities in the US and Canada.

I look forward to sharing details of other new GlobalPSC members, research projects and events in the near future. As you can imagine, there will be strong international elements to them.

 

Guest Blog – Coordination in Waste Policy
nick_harford2

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Nick Harford, Managing Director of Equilibrium

The latest edition of Corporate Waste Solutions contains an article in which I argue that in Australia there are pockets of good resource recovery and product stewardship, but that more can be done.

The article points out that the resource recovery side of waste management is increasingly influenced by global factors and where the market is not delivering good waste management, where valuable resources are being lost and where health and the environment are exposed to risk, policy needs to address market failures and provide appropriate interventions.

In this regard, a key outcome of Australia’s National Waste Policy has been the Product Stewardship Act and the product stewardship schemes it has, if not directly spawned, aided. These include the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS), Paintback, FluoroCycle and Tyre Stewardship Australia, as well as endorsement for the long-running MobileMuster.

Clearly, while the performance of some schemes such as the NTCRS has attracted criticism because of failed recyclers and some poor outcomes, what cannot be refuted with respect to the schemes is this: if they were not in place e-waste and other materials would be a bigger environmental and social problem.

While the National Waste Policy may have been somewhat neglected and patchy as a vehicle for driving national coordinated approaches to a range of waste and recycling issues, product stewardship is proving to be a successful means for industry and government to establish programs that will have lasting economic, environmental and social value. For more detail, click here.

The views expressed do not necessarily represent those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

Nick Harford is Managing Director of Equilibrium, a Melbourne-based sustainability consulting and management company servicing a range of private companies and governments. From 2009-2014 Nick was also a director of the Metropolitan Waste Management Group. Prior to Equilibrium, Nick was Group General Manager of environment at packaging and recycling company Visy and has a background in corporate affairs, government and the media.

 

TechCollect Product Stewardship Forum

Collaboration and shared responsibility are key, and while Australia has implemented a range of product stewardship approaches, there is room for improvement. These were common themes at a product stewardship forum hosted recently in Sydney by GlobalPSC Corporate Member TechCollect. The forum was well-attended and featured a range of product categories including electronics, paint, agricultural chemicals and chemical containers, and tyres.

Carmel Dollisson opens TechCollect PS Forum 120816

TechCollect CEO Carmel Dollisson opens TechCollect’s Product Stewardship Forum

The Australian Government, a long-standing GlobalPSC Government Member, also provided essential context on Australia’s experience to date and on plans for the five-year review of Australia’s Product Stewardship Act 2011.

Peter Brisbane on PS Framework 120816

Peter Brisbane, Director, Stewardship and Waste for the Australian Department of Environment and Energy outlines Australia’s product stewardship framework 

Contact TechCollect or the GlobalPSC directly for more information and insights from the forum.

 

TechCollect Product Stewardship Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 7:00 pm, August 31st, 2016

Collaboration and shared responsibility are key, and while Australia has implemented a range of product stewardship approaches, there is room for improvement. These were common themes at a product stewardship forum hosted recently in Sydney by GlobalPSC Corporate Member TechCollect. The forum was well-attended and featured a range of product categories including electronics, paint, agricultural chemicals and chemical containers, and tyres.

Carmel Dollisson opens TechCollect PS Forum 120816

TechCollect CEO Carmel Dollisson opens TechCollect’s Product Stewardship Forum

 

The Australian Government, a long-standing GlobalPSC Government Member, also provided essential context on Australia’s experience to date and on plans for the five-year review of Australia’s Product Stewardship Act 2011.

Peter Brisbane on PS Framework 120816

Peter Brisbane, Director, Stewardship and Waste for the Australian Department of Environment and Energy outlines Australia’s product stewardship framework 

Contact TechCollect or the GlobalPSC directly for more information and insights from the forum.

 

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9449 9909
Fax: +61 2 9449 9901
Email: info@globalpsc.net