The Global Product Stewardship Council

Unilever Increase Recycling of Rigid Plastics

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 7:38 pm, August 31st, 2018

Unilever Australia & New Zealand is introducing at least 25% Australia-sourced post-consumer recycled plastic for bottles of brands such as OMO, Dove, Surf, Sunsilk and TRESemmé, and commit to going further when technically possible.

The move will create an end market for approximately 750 tonnes of recycled plastic per year – equivalent to more than 100m single-use plastic bags*.

“As a consumer goods company, we are acutely aware of the consequences of a linear take-make-dispose model and we want to change it. We are proud to be taking this step forward, but no business can create a circular economy in isolation. Creating a local market and demand for all types of recycled plastic is critical and heavy lifting is needed from all players involved – suppliers, packaging converters, brand owners, policy makers and retailers, collectors, sorters and recyclers. We need a complete shift in how we think about and use resources.”, said Clive Stiff, CEO Unilever Australia & New Zealand.

In 2017 Unilever committed globally to design all of its plastic packaging to be fully reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025 (which would be consistent with a target set in April 2018 by Australia’s Meeting of Environment Ministers) and to use at least 25% recycled plastic packaging by 2025.

*Based on average single-use grocery plastic bag weight of 5.5g

 

Plasticity Forum Kuala Lumpur 25 October

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 10:01 am, August 23rd, 2018

Towards a , eradication of and  . Kuala Lumpur 25 October.

 

Plasticity KL

Building Roads with Plastic Bags and Glass

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 5:09 pm, August 3rd, 2018

 

 

fullsizeoutput_730b

 

The GlobalPSC joined one of our Sustaining Corporate Members, Close the Loop, and other stakeholders for the launch of the first road in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, built from soft plastics and glass.

The road, in the Sutherland Shire, incorporated soft plastics (equal to 176,000 plastic bags), glass (equal to over 55,000 glass bottles), toner from almost 4,000 toner cartridges and 66 tonnes of asphalt from reclaimed roads.

Infrastructure service provider Downer notes that the road product, called Plastiphalt, is cost competitive and has a 65 per cent improvement in fatigue life, as well as increased resistance to deformation. These characteristics allow Plastiphalt roads to last longer and to better handle heavy vehicle traffic.

Nerida Mortlock, General Manager of Close the Loop Australia, noted, “Our close partnership with Downer, along with our collaborative partnerships with RedCycle and Plastic Police has allowed us to design, develop and manufacture sustainable products using problematic waste  streams. We are very pleased to see soft plastics used for the first time in a NSW road”.

 

International Stewardship Forum 2018 – Sydney Outcomes

The Issues and Options Paper reflects summary outcomes of the international Stewardship Forum held April 2018 in Sydney. 

GlobalPSC_Intl_Stewardship_Forum_Issues_Paper_0618

GlobalPSC News – June 2018

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 6:46 pm, June 30th, 2018

 

International Stewardship Forum Outcomes

 

ISF18_D1S1_R5A9347

 

Highlights from the GlobalPSC’s International Stewardship Forum, including recommendations to the Australian Government for improvements to the Product Stewardship Act 2011, are now available in the Forum’s Issues and Options Paper.

The International Stewardship Forum was held in Sydney from 4-6 April 2018. With over 130 participants and 13 international speakers, the Forum provided a unique opportunity for participants to gather practical insights from product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs across a broad range of products and substances.

For more information, click here.

 

Approaching Deadline for EPR Reporting in Chile

 

Flag of Chile

Under the provisions of the second transitory article of Law No 20,920, producers of certain priority products are obligation to report information to the Chilean Ministry of Environment. The submission date for products placed on the market last year is 31 August, under the Exempt Resolution No. 0409/2018 of the MMA.

The obligation applies to producers of the following products: lubricating oils, electrical and electronic devices, batteries (split by weight), packaging, tyres, and newspapers and magazines. You are considered a producer of a priority product if you sell one of the obligated products for the first time in the market; dispose of priority products acquired from a third party that is not the first distributor; or import priority products for your own professional use. Furthermore, in the case of packaging, a producer is the person who introduces the packaging or packaged consumer goods into the market.

For more information, click here.

 

Australian Senate Recommends Stronger Product Stewardship

 

IMG_6645

 

An Australian Senate inquiry into waste and recycling has recommended shifting from Australia’s traditional preference for voluntary product stewardship to greater introduction of mandatory schemes.

The inquiry’s final report contained a number of recommendations specific to product stewardship, including:

  • prioritising the establishment of a circular economy.
  • a national container deposit scheme.
  • making Australia’s product stewardship schemes under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 mandatory.
  • mandatory schemes for tyres, mattresses, e-waste and photovoltaic panels.
  • re-establishment of the Product Stewardship Advisory Group.
  • a phase-out of petroleum-based single-use plastics by 2023.

For more information, click here.

 

Modulated Fees in EPR 

 

Earlier this year, the Secretary of State for the Environment in the UK, Michael Gove, announced a reform of the current Packaging Recovery Note (PRN) system based on a consultation taking place later this year. Following this, there has been a lot of talk about modulated fees, which are already in place in the French and Italian packaging compliance schemes, CONAI and Citeo. Modulated fees are those which vary with the eco-design of the packaging, for example, a lower fee is charged for plastic that is easily recyclable and a higher fee is charged for plastic that is not widely recyclable.

For more information, click here.

 

 

 

International Stewardship Forum Outcomes

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 6:19 pm, June 30th, 2018

 

ISF18_D1S1_R5A9347

 

Highlights from the GlobalPSC’s International Stewardship Forum, including recommendations to the Australian Government for improvements to the Product Stewardship Act 2011, are now available in the Forum’s Issues and Options Paper.

The International Stewardship Forum was held in Sydney from 4-6 April 2018. With over 130 participants and 13 international speakers, the Forum provided a unique opportunity for participants to gather practical insights from product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs across a broad range of products and substances.

The Forum was designed to maximise discussion and interaction between local and international representatives. It involved:

  • two days of presentations and panel discussions.
  • a final day of discussions with select stakeholders to reflect upon the Forum presentations, identify key insights, and help map out a way forward for product stewardship in Australia. These discussions followed a modified Chatham House Rule to encourage openness and information sharing.

The Forum was designed and structured to help inform the Australian Government’s 2018 review of the Product Stewardship Act 2011 (the Act).

The paper provides an overview of some of the issues, ideas and solutions that were raised by participants over the three days. It is structured in two sections:

  • high level insights into the design and implementation of effective product stewardship policies and programs
  • the implications of these insights for Australian policy, including the current review of the Act.

Download the Forum’s Issues and Options Paper here.

 

Approaching Deadline for EPR Reporting in Chile

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 5:28 pm, June 30th, 2018

Flag of Chile

Under the provisions of the second transitory article of Law No 20,920, producers of certain priority products are obligation to report information to the Chilean Ministry of Environment. The submission date for products placed on the market last year is 31 August, under the Exempt Resolution No. 0409/2018 of the MMA.

The obligation applies to producers of the following products: lubricating oils, electrical and electronic devices, batteries (split by weight), packaging, tyres, and newspapers and magazines. You are considered a producer of a priority product if you sell one of the obligated products for the first time in the market; dispose of priority products acquired from a third party that is not the first distributor; or import priority products for your own professional use. Furthermore, in the case of packaging, a producer is the person who introduces the packaging or packaged consumer goods into the market.

Product Definition

Lubricating oil​

Liquid substance of mineral or synthetic base, formulated for reduced friction, to dissipate heat and facilitate movement between pieces. Applicable to machines and tools of all kinds, including domestic and individual. ​​

Electrical and electronic devices​

Electrical appliances and electronic apparatus that to function correctly need electrical power or electromagnetic fields, as well as the necessary devices to generate, transmit and measure such streams and fields. ​

Batteries (baterias)​

Any source of electrical energy obtained by direct energy transformation from chemicals and constituted b one or several elements, with a weight greater than 2 kg. ​

Packaging and packaged products​

Packaging and packaged products manufactured with any material and from any nature, in order to be used as containment or protecting, or to manipulate, facilitate delivery, to stock, transport or to improve the presentation of distant product, from raw materials to processed items. ​

Batteries (pilas)​

Any source of electrical energy obtained by direct transformation of chemical energy and consisting of one or more elements, not weighing more than 2 kg. ​

Newspapers and magazines

Diaries, newspapers and all printed publication that are published and distributed periodically, orientated to deliver news, to inform or to entertain. ​​

​The reports must be submitted through the Emissions Registry and Transfers of Pollutants website and should include the following information: quantity (in units, cubic metres or tons, whichever is appropriate) of priority products marketed in the country during 2017; collection activities such as recycling and disposal carried out in the same period, and its cost; Quantity (units, cubic meters or tons) of waste collected and recycled in said period; Indication that if the management for the activities of collection and recycling is carried out individually or in association with other producers.

Producers must also register on the Polluting Emissions and Transfer Registry and access the Extended Producer Responsibility (REP) platform, where they can make their declaration.

Analysis provided by GlobalPSC Corporate Members Lorax Compliance.

 

Australian Senate Recommends Stronger Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 4:54 pm, June 30th, 2018

 

IMG_6645

 

An Australian Senate inquiry into waste and recycling has recommended shifting from Australia’s traditional preference for voluntary product stewardship to greater introduction of mandatory schemes.

The inquiry’s final report contained a number of recommendations specific to product stewardship, including:

  • prioritising the establishment of a circular economy.
  • a national container deposit scheme.
  • making Australia’s product stewardship schemes under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 mandatory.
  • mandatory schemes for tyres, mattresses, e-waste and photovoltaic panels.
  • re-establishment of the Product Stewardship Advisory Group.
  • a phase-out of petroleum-based single-use plastics by 2023.
In accordance with an original intent of extended producer responsibility, the inquiry recommended “that the Australian Government extend producer responsibility under product stewardship schemes to ensure better environmental and social outcomes through improved design”.

Some of the related measures recommended by the inquiry include:

  • strengthening various aspects of the National Waste Report.
  • targets for recycled content.
  • promotion of sustainable procurement policies.
  • reaffirmation of the waste hierarchy, with waste reduction and recycling prioritised over energy from waste.

Plastic pollution, particularly plastics in marine environments, are also highlighted in the inquiry, with recommendations including establishment of a Plastics Co-Operative Research Centre to lead Australia’s research efforts into reducing plastic waste and a recommitment to recommendations of an earlier Senate inquiry into the threat of marine plastic pollution in Australia.

Participants in the GlobalPSC’s International Stewardship Forum contributed to the inquiry and various recommendations from the Forum are reflected in the final report and recommendations.

 

Modulated Fees in EPR

Posted by GlobalPSC in Guest Blogs at 11:06 am, June 30th, 2018

Earlier this year, the Secretary of State for the Environment in the UK, Michael Gove, announced a reform of the current Packaging Recovery Note (PRN) system based on a consultation taking place later this year. Following this, there has been a lot of talk about modulated fees, which are already in place in the French and Italian packaging compliance schemes, CONAI and Citeo. Modulated fees are those which vary with the eco-design of the packaging, for example, a lower fee is charged for plastic that is easily recyclable and a higher fee is charged for plastic that is not widely recyclable.

In a recent conference, Mary Creagh MP, Chair of the Environment Audit Committee, spoke about the reform of the PRN system and how she thought producers should be charged modulated fees. Peter Maddox, Director of WRAP, agreed producers should be rewarded for good eco-design and such products should be readily available to consumers. Representing the industries point of view, Susanne Baker, Head of environment and compliance at techUK said the company welcomes the PRN reform and they’re expecting modulated fees to be a game changer.

Following his announcement, Mr Gove received advice from three bodies: the Advisory Committee on Packaging; packaging group INCPEN; and resource charity WRAP concerning the reform. The bodies suggested that producers should design packaging to be more recyclable. In addition, there should be an approved list defining what is and what is not deemed to be recyclable.

In Italy, modulated fees are already in place in the packaging compliance scheme, CONAI. In this system, plastic packaging is split into bands based on how easy it is to recycle and which waste stream it ends up in. All other materials currently remain the same and are not yet split into bands. The plastic packaging contribution diversification is split into three criteria: recyclable packaging selectable by circuit commerce and industry; recyclable packaging selectable from home circuit; packaging not selectable/ recyclable according to current technologies.

In France, the packaging compliance scheme Citeo uses modulated fees through a penalties and bonuses system.

The bonuses include:

  • Awareness bonuses on-pack, ranging from 5-8%
  • Awareness bonuses off-pack of 8% or 4%
  • 8% bonus for reductions in weight, etc. and improvement of recyclability
  • 12% bonus for plastic packaging that is included in the national sorting instructions
  • 8% bonus for rigid plastic packaging that can join an existing recycling channel

 The penalties include:

  • 100% penalty for packaging in the national sorting instruction but without an existing recycling channel
  • 50% penalty for PET packaging with mineral pacifiers
  • 10% penalty for packaging containing mineral oils

Through systems such as those in place in France and Italy, producers are incentivised to place packaging on the market that is easier to reuse and recycle. Recycling labels can often be unclear and confusing to consumers hence choosing the product with ‘better’ packaging is not always simple. Through modulated fees there is an opportunity to remove the choice from consumers and only provide packaging that is reusable or easily recyclable.

Analysis provided by GlobalPSC Corporate Members Lorax Compliance.

 

GlobalPSC News – April 2018

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 11:24 pm, April 30th, 2018

International Stewardship Forum

Version 2

In early April, the GlobalPSC convened the inaugural International Stewardship Forum in Sydney. With over 130 participants and speakers based in nine countries, the Forum provided a unique opportunity for participants to gather practical insights from product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs across a broad range of products and substances. The Forum was designed and structured to help inform the Australian Government’s 2018 review of the Product Stewardship Act 2011.

Activities began with site visits for international speakers and Forum sponsors of innovative waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) processing technologies. In addition to touring TES Australia and New Zealand’s Sydney WEEE reprocessing site, we toured the world’s first small, modular recycling plant “microfactories” developed by the University of NSW’s Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology (SMaRT) the day prior to their official launch. The microfactories are capable of breaking down WEEE into products like metal alloys, nanoparticles for industrial-grade ceramics and filaments for 3D printing.

The Forum was designed to maximise discussion and interaction between local and international representatives, and involved two days of presentations and panel discussions. Presentations have been made available to participants through the event app and are being uploaded to the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members via the Members Page.

A final day of discussions with select stakeholders reflected upon the Forum presentations, identified key insights, and helped map out a way forward for product stewardship in Australia. These invitation-only discussions followed a modified Chatham House Rule to encourage openness and information sharing at a historic site on Sydney Harbour, while incorporating traditional Aboriginal ceremonies and a networking reception aboard a tall ship.

 

Version 3

 

Version 2

 

An Issues and Options Paper capturing the Forum and Chatham House discussions is being reviewed and will be made available to GlobalPSC members and Forum participants in the near future once the review is complete.

We’d like to extend special thanks to all the supporters and sponsors that not only made the Forum possible, but helped create such a strong model for future events. The GlobalPSC has already been in discussions with regional partners about holding future Forums in Europe and Australia, with other regions also under consideration. Contact us to be informed of future events.

21714_GPS_FORUM_PP SPONSORS

 

Implementation of 2018 Open Scope WEEE

The EU WEEE Directive (Directive 2012/19/EU) introduced a number of changes to the original Directive (Directive 2002/96/EC), including an “Open Scope” of 6 revised categories instead of the previous 10, which according to the Directive are to be introduced from 15 August 2018. The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive, which was made an EU law in February 2003, was instituted to set collection, recycling and recovery targets for electrical goods. The Directive sets the foundations for the creation of collection/compliance schemes. The aim of the schemes is to ensure that WEEE is collected and reused or recycled.

The six new categories to be introduced are:

  1. Temperature exchange equipment: fridges, freezers, air conditioning, etc.
  2. Screens, monitors, and equipment containing screens having a surface greater than 100 cm2: TVs, computer monitors, etc.
  3. Lamps
  4. Large equipment (any external dimension more than 50cm): washing machines, dish washers, cookers, luminaires, large printers, copying equipment in general, etc.
  5. Small equipment (no external dimension more than 50cm): vacuum cleaners, calculators, video cameras, cameras, hifi equipment, watches and clocks, smoke detectors, payment systems, etc.
  6. Small IT and telecommunication equipment (no external dimension more than 50 cm): mobile phones, tablets, routers, laptops, GPS, printers, etc.

For more information, click here.

 

Packaging EPR Regulation in Mozambique

Mozambique’s Decree 79/2017, of 28 December 2017, approving the Regulation on the Extended Responsibility of Producers and Importers of Packaging, was approved by the Council of Ministers and came into force on 29th December 2017. The Regulation applies to all public and private entities, natural or legal persons engaged in the production, import and management of packaging to increase their responsibility in order to safeguard the environment and public health.

All packaging is obligated under this regulation including commercial and domestic packaging and the packaging waste produced. The ​​Ministry for the Environment is responsible for drafting and disclosure of rules and procedures in the context of the production and import of packaging and packaging waste. The Ministry for Industry and Commerce is responsible for establishing rules and standards applicable to import and production of packaging. Furthermore, under the Regulation, the Ministry for Finance is responsible for the collection of fees and fines as well as the supervision of the rules applicable to packaging in the context of clearance goods.

Producers and importers of packaging and packaging waste are responsible for the management of packaging and packaging waste, pursuant to the Regulation and other applicable legislation; the payment of fees for the management of packaging and the return and recovery of packaging waste, whether directly or through organisations created for waste recovery.

Further detail is in the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members via the Members Page. Analysis provided by GlobalPSC Corporate Members Lorax Compliance.

 

Page 1 of 3912345...102030...Last »
Subscribe
Receive news and updates from us

GlobalPSC Facebook