The Global Product Stewardship Council

GlobalPSC and PSI Extend Discounted Membership Opportunity!

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 1:20 pm, September 29th, 2012

 

 

 

After a successful trial period, the Global Product Stewardship Council (GlobalPSC) and Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) are pleased to extend reciprocal 20% discounts on memberships and partnerships for another year.

What this means

From now through September 2013, current PSI partners will receive a 20% discount when signing up for GlobalPSC membership, and current GlobalPSC members will receive a 20% discount when joining PSI. It’s that simple!

What’s more, new applicants interested in joining both PSI and GlobalPSC may take advantage of both discounts.

About Global PSC and PSI

The GlobalPSC is an independent, nonprofit, membership-based association dedicated to understanding and advancing the principles of product stewardship. The GlobalPSC provides an online clearinghouse for product stewardship, as well as opportunities to lead product stewardship efforts and join a growing, global network of product stewardship leaders. Members span six countries and include businesses of all sizes, NGOs, and governments at federal, state, provincial, and local levels.

The Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing the health and environmental impacts of consumer products at the end of their useful lives. PSI brings together key stakeholders with conflicting interests to develop product end-of-life solutions in a collaborative manner, with a focus on having manufacturers assume primary financial and managerial responsibility. With a robust membership base of 47 state governments and over 200 local governments, as well as partnerships with more than 75 companies, organizations, universities, and non-U.S. governments, PSI advances both voluntary programs and legislation to promote industry-led product stewardship initiatives.

Both the GlobalPSC and PSI assist with the development of effective product stewardship schemes through the facilitation of stakeholder discussions and the objective sharing of information.

Benefits to You

GlobalPSC and PSI provide complimentary benefits to their members and partners. These include public recognition and promotion, access to cutting-edge information and market influencers, networking opportunities, and the chance to help shape policies internationally.

For more information, please visit www.globalpsc.net or www.productstewardship.us. To take advantage of this special offer right now, email russ@globalpsc.net or rachel@productstewardship.us.

PSI Webinars and Discounts for GlobalPSC Members

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 10:02 am, September 28th, 2012

The Product Stewardship Institute is providing all GlobalPSC Members with a special discount rate to participate in the webinar: “The Roles of Government and Industry in Attaining High Performing Product Stewardship Programs.”

GlobalPSC members may register for US$90 (a 25% discount on the regular rate). Please note your GlobalPSC membership affiliation on the registration page to take advantage of this opportunity!

For GlobalPSC members who unable to attend live, the webinar recording will be available for US$65. See the PSI website for more information.

The Roles of Government and Industry in Attaining High Performing Product Stewardship Programs

Tuesday, November 27, 2012
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. ET
(10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. PT)

How are the roles of government and industry best divided in order to achieve the highest levels of performance in product stewardship programs? This question, first considered during PSI’s 13th webinar series, will be explored on a deeper level in this interactive webinar sequel. Government, business, and academic perspectives will be presented on the proper role of government in product stewardship programs, and whether key program principles, such as transparency and accountability, are best attained through voluntary, mandatory, or hybrid programs that encompass elements from both approaches. On this webinar, presenters will analyze a range of voluntary and regulated programs in relation to their performance and effectiveness in increasing collection and recycling rates, educating consumers, containing costs, and minimizing free riders. Speakers will also elaborate on the performance measures they see as most effective. Ample opportunity for audience participation will also be provided. This webinar is co-sponsored by the Global Product Stewardship Council.

Moderator:

  • Scott Cassel, CEO and Founder, Product Stewardship Institute

Speakers:

  • Alison Keane, Vice President of Government Affairs, American Coatings Association
  • Reid Lifset, Associate Director, Industrial Environmental Mgmt. Program, Yale University
  • Russ Martin, President, Global Product Stewardship Council
  • Fenton Rood, Director of Waste Systems Planning, OK Department of Environmental Quality
  • Neg Norton, President, Local Search Association (Invited)

This webinar is co-sponsored by:

REGISTER NOW

Additional webinars in this series:

Webinar Fees and Registration Information

  • Webinars are FREE for PSI Full Members and Sustaining Partners
  • PSI Partners pay US$90 per webinar
  • Affiliate and Non PSI Members/Partners pay US$120 per webinar

Questions? Contact Julia Jonas-Day, PSI’s Program Associate at julia@productstewardship.us, or +1-617-236-4771.

Product Stewardship Institute

+1-617-236-4855

AgStewardship Australia’s drumMUSTER Program Collects Its 20 Millionth Drum

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 1:53 pm, September 19th, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

AgStewardship Australia’s drumMUSTER program has recently collected its 20 millionth drum. Background on this milestone is available here. More detailed information on drumMUSTER and the 20 millionth drum is available here.

AgStewardship Australia is a Sustaining Corporate member of the Global Product Stewardship Council. We greatly appreciate their involvement and congratulate them on their ongoing activities.

Event Update from the GlobalPSC team

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 11:36 am, September 13th, 2012

WasteMINZ Conference, 16-19 October in Hamilton, New Zealand

The theme of this years’ WasteMINZ Conference is Challenge, Change and Collaboration. It is about recognising the many challenges our industry faces in these times of significant fiscal and resource constraint and ensuring we plan smartly for the inevitable societal, legislative and policy changes ahead. We want to actively explore how government, the private sector and communities can work collaboratively to address these issues.

Click here for more information

 

Zero Waste Summit 22-23 October in Melbourne

The Zero Waste Summit has grown to become one of the most important annual waste sector events in Australia and is returning for the fourth year for an open exchange of strategies for resource recovery and waste diversion to landfill.

Click here to find out more details about the event

 

Sydney & Melbourne Round Tables on Sustainable Packaging

The Global Product Stewardship Council and Sustainable Packaging Alliance (SPA) are hosting a series of Round Tables on Sustainable Packaging in Sydney and Melbourne.

The Round Tables are designed to give industry and stakeholders the opportunity to learn of new developments and discuss issues affecting the packaging sector.

Click here for more information

 

Electronics Recycling Asia November 13 -16, Guangzhou, China

The Global Product Stewardship Council has been invited to speak at the Electronics Recycling Asia event November 13 – 16, 2012 in Guangzhou, China, and is partnering with event organisers. The conference brochure is available here.

During the conference, leading recycling experts from around the world – including manufacturers, collectors, processors, steelmakers, legislators and policy-makers

Click here for more information

 

Product Stewardship Panel at Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo 22 November

The Global Product Stewardship Council is pleased to be partnering with the Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo (AWRE) to hold a panel discussion on product stewardship implementation.

The panel will help attendees understand some of the opportunities and challenges of product stewardship, with particular emphasis on Australia’s new TV and computer recycling scheme.

The AWRE is taking place 21 and 22 November at the Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour.

Click here for more information

 

Special offers to GlobalPSC members

GlobalPSC members receive discounts to all of these events except for Electronics Recycling Asia. If you require any assistance or further information regarding discounts, please contact Russ Martin – russ@globalpsc.net

Global Perspective on Broader Producer Responsibility

Posted by GlobalPSC in Guest Blogs at 8:56 pm, September 11th, 2012

By Russ Martin, Global Product Stewardship Council President

The GlobalPSC’s own Russ Martin recently wrote on global developments in broader producer responsibility for Sustainability Matters. The article is now available here.

Product Stewardship Panel at Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo 22 November 2012

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 8:38 pm, September 11th, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Global Product Stewardship Council is pleased to be partnering with the Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo (AWRE) to hold a panel discussion on product stewardship implementation. The panel has now sold out prior to the event.

The panel will help attendees understand some of the opportunities and challenges of product stewardship, with particular emphasis on Australia’s new TV and computer recycling scheme.

The AWRE is taking place 21 and 22 November at the Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour.

The product stewardship panel discussion will take place on 22 November from 3:10 to 4:30 pm. Confirmed speakers include:

  • Steve Rust, Managing Director of Panasonic Australia Pty Ltd;
  • Peter Brisbane, Director, Television and Computer Regulator Team for the Australian Government’s Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities;
  • Carmel Dollisson, General Manager of Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited; and
  • Peter Bruce, Director – Service Parts Logistics, Australia for DHL Supply Chain.

The GlobalPSC will be facilitating the panel.

Steve will provide a large manufacturer’s perspective, including the importance of ensuring that the scheme works properly and the importance of being able to demonstrate responsible recycling of products. Carmel and Bruce will provide the perspective of approved arrangements responsible for delivering key outcomes of the scheme and the issues they face in doing so.

A facilitated panel discussion will follow short presentations by the expert panel members.  These key TV& computer scheme participants will provide the opportunity to answer questions such as:

The AWRE is the largest and most highly attended waste and recycling trade show in Australia. Now in its third year, the AWRE offers everyone in the industry an opportunity to showcase innovation, network with key waste & recycling decision makers from industry and government and attend high quality practical waste & recycling management seminars and workshops on key topics.

AWRE registration is free for all industry professionals.

Events Update

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events at 8:48 pm, September 5th, 2012

The Global Product Stewardship Council is hosting or presenting at the following events:

At each of these events, we will be promoting the involvement of GlobalPSC members and our activities.

* GlobalPSC member discounts available

How Could Local Governments Miss out on Product Stewardship?

Posted by GlobalPSC in Guest Blogs at 11:06 am, September 3rd, 2012

By Russ Martin, Global Product Stewardship Council President

Russ blogs regularly on product stewardship for the Business Environment Network (BEN). This blog originally appeared on BEN and has been reposted with permission of BEN publishers. 

Extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship have long had as a fundamental purpose the shifting of physical and financial responsibility for products away from local waste management and recycling programs back to producers and consumers.

Some of our colleagues in the U.S., the Product Stewardship Institute, have estimated the potential benefits to local programs of producer responsibility at over U.S. $2 billion. These benefits include actual costs, which would be the direct financial savings to a local government of implementing an EPR program and service benefits, which is the value of the added benefits a municipality would receive if EPR were to take hold. For example, many local governments in the U.S. dry and dispose of latex paint because it is a lower priority than other household hazardous waste products. If they had the money, they would collect it for recycling.

So if benefits are supposed to accrue mainly to local programs, how might local governments miss out on EPR and product stewardship? Simply by not understanding product stewardship, how it’s intended to work or how to make the most of it. Or, they could fail to engage effectively with other stakeholders.

First, some basics. Most consumers want products to be responsibly managed when they reach end-of-life. More product stewardship schemes across a broader range of items are likely.

Businesses will want to leverage existing resources, including local government collections and infrastructure, rather than start new programs completely from scratch. Local governments that engage industry can reduce their infrastructure and consumer education costs. Transparency and accountability of services provided will be an important issue.

Recent discussions with a variety of local government officials have shown that many still don’t seem to understand some of these basics. The idea is not to get grants from the government for collecting additional products. Nor to invite product stewardship organisations to tender for collection / recycling contracts of particular products.  Rather it’s about councils forming partnerships with product stewardship organisations to provide certain services. Strong standards will be necessary, and these will affect expectations and costs for all stakeholders. Collections should be free to consumers, and in some cases this may be regulated as in the new national TV and computer recycling scheme (NB: in Australia).

In addition, the targets for the TV and computer scheme will not necessarily match up to likely volumes of materials available for collection. The first annual recycling target is 30 per cent in 2012–13, increasing progressively each year to reach 80 per cent in 2021–22.

However, we can expect a great deal of collections initially, especially with the digital switchover and a backlog of end-of-life TVs and computers spread across Australia. Then the pendulum is likely to swing back the other way before eventually stabilising in say 5-6 years. As the targets start to really kick in, industry will then be scouring for TVs and computers in order to meet their targets. The characteristics of the products in and materials out of the scheme will vary significantly during this time, which will further complicate planning, implementation and basic commercial viability.

Liable parties under the scheme are paying co-regulatory arrangements to meet their target obligations in a cost-effective way. Once the arrangements meet their liable parties’ targets, recycling above and beyond that point simply represents a cost for which funding from liable parties cannot readily be sought. Yet the scheme’s first collections in the ACT exceeded the arrangement’s annual target for that region in one month.

Public interest and engagement cannot readily be turned on and off like a tap. Industry and local governments will need to collaborate with State and Commonwealth governments on how best to manage consumer expectations while delivering meaningful outcomes.

Consistency and reliability of service to customers is important. Yet, existing co-regulatory arrangements already diverge on whether they will cover the costs for collecting and processing TVs and computers beyond their target volumes. Councils will not be able to charge consumers for TV and computer recycling, then return those products through an approved arrangement.

This means that the cost for any excess collections beyond target volumes would need to be covered by councils, state or federal governments to maintain free collections to the consumer and avoid discouraging an engaged public. This is a transitional, yet very important, issue that will need to be managed carefully as we move towards fuller industry funding of programs.

So, if you’re a local government, how do you go about making the most of product stewardship?

First, know where you stand. What items have the greatest impacts (in terms of toxicity/hazard, volumes and public concern)? What are your costs for managing end-of-life products responsibly (including education, collections, recycling, disposal of residuals, externality costs, insurance and illegal dumping clean-up costs)?

Second, know where others stand and understand their needs. What programs are already in existence? What programs are planned or could potentially be implemented?

Third, actively engage with industries, state governments and other stakeholders. Seek agreement on program details and funding for issues such as collection types, frequency and accessibility for consumers; how best to promote returns and manage community expectations; how to address material quality/contamination; education; risks, roles and responsibilities; cost allocation (and neutrality?); auditing/verification and public reporting.

The local governments that understand these factors are in a much stronger position to truly benefit from product stewardship, especially if product stewardship expands to other items such as paints, pharmaceuticals and other e-waste beyond what we’re already seeing.

British Columbia, Canada Brings in First Complete Waste Electrical & Electronics Extended Producer Responsibility Program in North America

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 3:18 pm, August 31st, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If it comes with a battery or a plug British Columbia now recycles it. As of July 1, 2012, BC has expanded its extended producer responsibility (EPR) recycling programs to collect and safely deal with the largest variety of waste electrical & electronic equipment (WEEE) of any other jurisdiction in North America. For the first time in North America, all end-of-life electronic and electrical products can now be recycled.

As the demands of recycling have increased, so have the number of industry-led stewardship agencies in response to the BC Recycling Regulation. The Recycling Regulation shifts taxpayer funded responsibility for managing end-of-life products and packaging to producers and consumers.

In 2009, the Electronics and Electrical Category defined under the BC Recycling Regulation was amended to phase in an expanded list of products to fall under EPR programs, culminating in the July 1, 2012 compliance date.

In the case of WEEE, several collection channels were cooperatively developed. The use of existing Encorp Pacific (Canada) Return-It™ depots by the Electronic Products Recycling Association (EPRA) began in 2007. Encorp was contracted to manage EPRA’s operations under the Return-It™ Electronics label. Independently owned depots are situated throughout BC allowing consumers and businesses easy access. Businesses with large volume of used products can utilize the free of charge direct pick-up services. EPRA also works with businesses that collect end-of-life electronic products from vendors like the BC Lottery Corporation who collects and arranges the recycling of old video gaming machines.

The WEEE programs started out recycling computers, televisions, key boards and printers and now collect: all batteries, cell phones, thermostats, fluorescent lamps, lighting equipment, smoke detectors, small and large appliances, electrical and electronic tools, medical devices, automatic dispensers, toys, musical instruments, leisure and sports equipment, monitoring and control instruments, IT and telecommunications equipment and accessories for use with any e-waste products.

Detailed analysis and results, as provided by Global Product Stewardship Council Corporate Members Encorp Pacific (Canada) Vice President, Development & CMO Sandy Sigmond, has been made available on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

Other GlobalPSC members based in the province include the British Columbia Ministry of Environment and the Recycling Council of British Columbia.

Profiles for GlobalPSC Members

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 2:57 pm, August 31st, 2012

The Global Product Stewardship Council is pleased to have a diverse range of businesses, governments and NGOs among our members. Check out recent profiles on the following GlobalPSC members:

Current members that wish to create a new profile or update their existing profile should contact the GlobalPSC at admin@globalpsc.net. Information on making the most of GlobalPSC membership is also available here.

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9489 8851
Fax: +61 2 9489 8553
Email: info@globalpsc.net