The Global Product Stewardship Council

StewardChoice Enterprises Announces Draft Stewardship Plan

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 11:56 am, May 29th, 2014

 

 

 

StewardChoice Enterprises Inc. (a subsidiary of GlobalPSC Corporate Member Reclay StewardEdge) has announced from the Recycling Council of British Columbia’s annual Zero Waste Conference that it will publish a draft stewardship plan for packaging and printed paper in British Columbia this June.

The draft plan will undergo public consultations in the coming months, then be submitted for approval to the BC Ministry of Environment. New recycling services will commence, initially in multi-family residential buildings, once approved.

“We see this as an opportunity to provide producers with more choice while offering cost-effective solutions,” says Neil Hastie, Development Director  for StewardChoice Enterprises Inc. and GlobalPSC President. “We strongly believe that producers should have the ability to choose a preferred service when determining how to meet their regulatory obligations.”

More than 20% of multi-family buildings in British Columbia do not currently receive a producer funded recycling service.

GlobalPSC Seeks Member Views for Product Stewardship Policy Submissions

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 10:37 pm, May 27th, 2014

The Global Product Stewardship Council is seeking the views of active GlobalPSC members to assist in the preparation of public submissions addressing proposed product stewardship policies in New Zealand and Nova Scotia. The GlobalPSC is also seeking Expressions of Interest from active GlobalPSC members for nomination to a GlobalPSC Advisory Group to provide direct input on GlobalPSC content and policies, including the planned submissions.

New Zealand has released a discussion paper on potential prioritisation for product stewardship under New Zealand’s Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and opened consultation until 2 July 2014.

Nova Scotia has flagged possible product stewardship / extended producer responsibility for 24 product categories as part of proposed changes to the provincial solid waste regulations and opened consultation until 11 July 2014. 

until 2 July 2014.
Consultation will be open until 2 July 2014.

Members are asked to email their views on the New Zealand and Nova Scotia discussion papers to the GlobalPSC by 10 June in order to allow time for compilation and drafting. Expressions of Interest for the Advisory Group are also welcome by 10 June, comprising brief biographies and interest in product stewardship not exceeding 800 words. Advisory Group members must be active GlobalPSC members, either as individuals or as part of a member organisation. Information on membership categories, benefits and registration is available here.

Contact GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin with any questions or comments.

Nova Scotia Solid Waste Regulations Review

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 9:37 pm, May 27th, 2014

Nova Scotia, Canada, is now consulting on proposed changes to the provincial solid waste regulations, including the potential for product stewardship / extended producer responsibility across a broad range of items. The consultation period is open until 11 July, 2014.

Seven key areas have been identified for potential amendment and are highlighted in the discussion paper, Revising Our Path Forward: A public discussion paper about solid waste regulation in Nova Scotia, including:

  • Product stewardship
  • Disposal bans and approval requirements
  • Used tire management program
  • Removal of the requirement for regional solid waste management plans
  • Clarity on the rules for energy from waste
  • Improve the enforceability of the solid waste regulation
  • Beverage container deposit-refund program

Written comments are encouraged and can be made online here. Questions or inquiries can be directed to the Solid Waste Unit, Nova Scotia Environment on +1 902 424-4300.

New Zealand Opens Consultation on Product Stewardship Priorities

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 3:36 pm, May 21st, 2014

Today New Zealand’s Minister for the Environment, the Hon Amy Adams MP, released a discussion paper on potential prioritisation for product stewardship under New Zealand’s Waste Minimisation Act 2008 (WMA). The Minister’s media release is available here.

The discussion paper released today raises the possibility and rationale for designating some or all of the following four products as priority products under the WMA:

  • electrical and electronic equipment (commonly referred to as e-waste or WEEE)
  • tyres
  • agricultural chemicals and farm plastics
  • refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases.

Consultation will be open until 2 July 2014. Detail on consultation workshops in NZ is available here. Following the consultation, the costs and benefits of a range of options and additional stakeholder input will be considered.

New Zealand’s focus has traditionally been on voluntary product stewardship approaches, and 11 voluntary product stewardship schemes have been accredited to date. An overview of the accredited schemes in included in the discussion paper.

 

GlobalPSC Member Profile – Return Unwanted Medicines (RUM) Project

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 3:22 pm, May 13th, 2014

Australia’s Return Unwanted Medicines (RUM) Project provides a national scheme for unwanted and out-of-date medicines to be collected by community pharmacies and disposed of by high temperature incineration, which is the EPA-approved method of disposal.

The RUM Project initiative represents a “world first” in the management and removal of unwanted and out-of-date medicines. Community pharmacies across Australia receive these unwanted medicines from consumers at no cost to the consumer.

This Commonwealth-funded program addresses a fundamental impediment to the quality use of medicines in Australia, namely safe disposal. It is recognised that hoarding of old and unwanted medicines can lead to the medicines becoming misused, abused or harming children if left lying around. Research also now demonstrates possible adverse environmental effects from inappropriately discarded pharmaceuticals in waterways (United States EPA).

The most common means of disposal – down the sink or toilet, or in the bin – may lead to poor environmental consequences.

The increasing number of medication options being provided to treat medical conditions results in frequent changes to medication. The aged consumer is confronted with a dazzling array of changing medications with subsequent confusion and often poor medication management. This confusion can be reduced with appropriate disposal of medicines no longer required.

 

Australian States Ramp Up Tyre Regulation in Parallel with Industry Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 5:56 pm, April 30th, 2014

Several large Australian states are stepping up regulation of waste tyres in advance of the implementation of an industry-led product stewardship approach. Senior Government officials have told the GlobalPSC that they will do what is necessary to improve tyre management through regulation and work with industry to improve management systems in parallel with the pending industry scheme.

The Victorian Government today gazetted a waste management policy to ban the unsafe stockpiling of waste tyres, partly in response to new commitments by the New South Wales (NSW) Government to tighten regulatory controls on waste tyres.

“In contrast with NSW and South Australia, Victoria does not have effective regulatory requirements for the management of waste tyres,” said Victorian Environment Minister Ryan Smith MP. “Consequently, tyre stockpiles are growing rapidly and will be expected to increase as NSW strengthens its regulation of waste tyres”.

In introducing the policy without delay, Minister Smith highlighted the key risk of improper storage of waste tyres as fire resulting from arson, accidents or bushfires.

Premises that store the equivalent of more than 5,000 waste passenger vehicle tyres or more than 40 tonnes of waste tyres must only store tyres for purposes such as transfer, reprocessing or energy recovery and must store the tyres in ways that minimise the risk of fire. Minister Smith will formally announce the new policy at a conference tomorrow

First R2 Certified Facility in South America

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 3:01 pm, April 30th, 2014

R2 Solutions has announced that Arrow Global Asset Disposition in Sao Paulo, Brazil, has become the first electronics recycler in South America to achieve R2 certification.

 

“We are extremely pleased with the leadership that Arrow Global Asset Disposition has shown as the first R2 Certified facility in South America,” stated John Lingelbach, Executive Director of R2 Solutions, the non-profit organization that governs the R2 Standard.  “As use of personal electronic devices continues to rapidly increase around the world, so does the need for safe and sustainable recycling facilities. The challenge to protect workers and the environment while maximizing the recovery of valuable materials found in end-of-life electronics has never been greater – and Arrow has stepped up to the challenge.  Arrow’s newly certified facility in Brazil is a tremendous development for the people of South America and the environment.  We congratulate Arrow on this very important achievement.”

Developed through a transparent, consensus-based process, the goal of the R2 standard was to develop a voluntary, market-based mechanism for expanding and encouraging the use of best practices for electronics refurbishing and recycling. The “R2 Certified” designation signifies that companies have passed an annual, multi-day inspection by a third party certifying body and are found to be in conformance with all the requirements of the R2 standard.

 

GlobalPSC News – April 2014

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 2:44 pm, April 30th, 2014

 

R2 Solutions has announced that Arrow Global Asset Disposition in Sao Paulo, Brazil, has become the first electronics recycler in South America to achieve R2 certification. “We are extremely pleased with the leadership that Arrow Global Asset Disposition has shown as the first R2 Certified facility in South America,” stated John Lingelbach, Executive Director of R2 Solutions, the non-profit organization that governs the R2 Standard.

“As use of personal electronic devices continues to rapidly increase around the world, so does the need for safe and sustainable recycling facilities. The challenge to protect workers and the environment while maximizing the recovery of valuable materials found in end-of-life electronics has never been greater – and Arrow has stepped up to the challenge. Arrow’s newly certified facility in Brazil is a tremendous development for the people of South America and the environment. We congratulate Arrow on this very important achievement.”

Developed through a transparent, consensus-based process, the goal of the R2 standard was to develop a voluntary, market-based mechanism for expanding and encouraging the use of best practices for electronics refurbishing and recycling. The “R2 Certified” designation signifies that companies have passed an annual, multi-day inspection by a third party certifying body and are found to be in conformance with all the requirements of the R2 standard.

 

Australian States Ramp Up Tyre Regulation in Parallel with Industry Product Stewardship

 

Several large Australian states are stepping up regulation of waste tyres in advance of the implementation of an industry-led product stewardship approach. Senior Government officials have told the GlobalPSC that they will do what is necessary to improve tyre management through regulation and work with industry to improve management systems in parallel with the pending industry scheme.

The Victorian Government today gazetted a waste management policy to ban the unsafe stockpiling of waste tyres, partly in response to new commitments by the New South Wales (NSW) Government to tighten regulatory controls on waste tyres.

“In contrast with NSW and South Australia, Victoria does not have effective regulatory requirements for the management of waste tyres,” said Victorian Environment Minister Ryan Smith MP. “Consequently, tyre stockpiles are growing rapidly and will be expected to increase as NSW strengthens its regulation of waste tyres”.

In introducing the policy without delay, Minister Smith highlighted the key risk of improper storage of waste tyres as fire resulting from arson, accidents or bushfires.

Premises that store the equivalent of more than 5,000 waste passenger vehicle tyres or more than 40 tonnes of waste tyres must only store tyres for purposes such as transfer, reprocessing or energy recovery and must store the tyres in ways that minimise the risk of fire. Minister Smith will formally announce the new policy at a conference tomorrow.

 

New GlobalPSC Members and Member Profiles

 

Events Update

The Global Product Stewardship Council is presenting at the following events:

  • 40th Annual RCBC Zero Waste Conference, 28-30 May 2014 in Whistler, Canada
  • WasteMET Asia, 2-4 June 2014 in Singapore

At these events, we will be promoting the involvement of GlobalPSC members and our activities.

Emerging Global EPR Best Practices for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 4:58 pm, March 31st, 2014

A new study of 11 international extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship programs for packaging and printed paper (PPP) has preliminarily identified a series of emerging global best practices to help optimize and harmonize solutions for managing packaging waste.

The report was led by the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) in association with PAC NEXT to help industry and government work together to find ways to reduce cost and regulatory complexity in existing and potential EPR programs for PPP.

“The preliminary findings of our research underscore what we at PSI have always believed: that, within the context of product stewardship, the most successful materials management programs often incorporate a combination of legislative and voluntary strategies,” said Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer of PSI and a member of the GlobalPSC Executive Committee. “The program summaries provided in this report offer a wealth of data for government agencies and industry groups around the world to evaluate, and we look forward to using this information as a springboard for critical stakeholder dialogues.”

The report examines EPR programs in Canada (Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, and British Columbia); Europe (Belgium, France, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom); and Australia. Based on an initial assessment of the data collected on these programs, PAC NEXT and PSI concluded that “the following attributes, when present together, can constitute a high performing EPR program:

  • The program covers residential, public, as well as industrial, commercial and institutional (IC+I) sources;
  • The program covers all material types (including printed paper);
  • The cost per ton is low;
  • Collection and recycling rates are high;
  • The value and quality of materials are high;
  • The program is convenient for residents and others;
  • Producers take full responsibility for post-consumer packaging management”.

“What this report has allowed us to do is develop an understanding of how EPR programs for packaging around the world operate – what they share in common, what they do different, what works, what could use some improvement,” said Jennifer Holliday, president of PSI’s board of directors. “It is our hope that these findings enable industry and government to collaborate on ways to harmonize packaging waste solutions.”

Also based on the data, PSI and PAC NEXT identified the following policies as “complementary to EPR, playing an important role in increasing the performance of packaging collection and recycling systems:

  • Pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) programs;
  • Mandatory recycling requirements;
  • Landfill bans for recyclable materials; and
  • Container deposit programs”.

The GlobalPSC provided program analysis in support of the study.

GlobalPSC News – March 2014

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 2:17 pm, March 31st, 2014

GlobalPSC Launches New Themes to be Explored with Members

Last week in Singapore, the GlobalPSC launched a series of themes to enable decision makers to more effectively draw upon international experience in product stewardship policy and to help raise the standards of recycling programs globally.

The roundtable discussions, hosted jointly by the GlobalPSC and Infoactiv at the Shangri-La Hotel Singapore, addressed a broad range of chemicals and products amongst key stakeholders including BASF, HP, Apple, Shell and CropLife Asia.

GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin provided a global overview of product stewardship and extended producer responsibility programs then launched the themes being examined by the GlobalPSC, which include:

  • Making meaningful comparisons between programs (especially for recycling rates and key performance measures)
  • The importance of responsible recycling
  • The future of product stewardship
  • Competition amongst producer responsibility organisations and service providers

The GlobalPSC will be refining and prioritising the themes in consultation with GlobalPSC members and sharing results through a variety of approaches, including GlobalPSC analysis, guest blogs (such as the recent guest blog on responsible recycling by R2 Solutions Board Member and former Senior Policy Advisor for the US EPA, Clare Lindsay) and social media, including discussions in LinkedIn. GlobalPSC members will be contacted over the next few weeks with specifics. These efforts will be assisted by product stewardship expert Marra Teasdale from her base in Singapore.

The Singapore roundtable was facilitated by Chris Mason and John Gertsakis from Infoactiv, and covered a range of key issues across the product life-cycle from Design for Environment and Cleaner Production through to product use and end-of-life management. Infoactiv’s focus during discussions was to explore the critical importance of regional priorities and cultural sensitivity given the diversity of countries and issues across the Asia Pacific region. The roundtable highlighted that the definition and application of Product Stewardship and EPR can vary dramatically mindful of context, culture and environmental priorities.

 

Emerging Global EPR Best Practices for Packaging

A new study of 11 international extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship programs for packaging and printed paper (PPP) has preliminarily identified a series of emerging global best practices to help optimize and harmonize solutions for managing packaging waste.

The report was led by the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) in association with PAC NEXT to help industry and government work together to find ways to reduce cost and regulatory complexity in existing and potential EPR programs for PPP.

“The preliminary findings of our research underscore what we at PSI have always believed: that, within the context of product stewardship, the most successful materials management programs often incorporate a combination of legislative and voluntary strategies,” said Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer of PSI and a member of the GlobalPSC Executive Committee. “The program summaries provided in this report offer a wealth of data for government agencies and industry groups around the world to evaluate, and we look forward to using this information as a springboard for critical stakeholder dialogues.”

The report examines EPR programs in Canada (Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, and British Columbia); Europe (Belgium, France, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom); and Australia. Based on an initial assessment of the data collected on these programs, PAC NEXT and PSI concluded that “the following attributes, when present together, can constitute a high performing EPR program:

  • The program covers residential, public, as well as industrial, commercial and institutional (IC+I) sources;
  • The program covers all material types (including printed paper);
  • The cost per ton is low;
  • Collection and recycling rates are high;
  • The value and quality of materials are high;
  • The program is convenient for residents and others;
  • Producers take full responsibility for post-consumer packaging management”.

“What this report has allowed us to do is develop an understanding of how EPR programs for packaging around the world operate – what they share in common, what they do different, what works, what could use some improvement,” said Jennifer Holliday, president of PSI’s board of directors. “It is our hope that these findings enable industry and government to collaborate on ways to harmonize packaging waste solutions.”

Also based on the data, PSI and PAC NEXT identified the following policies as “complementary to EPR, playing an important role in increasing the performance of packaging collection and recycling systems:

  • Pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) programs;
  • Mandatory recycling requirements;
  • Landfill bans for recyclable materials; and
  • Container deposit programs”.

The GlobalPSC provided program analysis in support of the study.

 

First Year Outcomes for Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Australia has released a report on the first year outcomes of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS or Scheme).

Reports have also been made publicly available for the three approved co-regulatory arrangements that were operational in 2012–13: DHL Supply Chain (Australia) Pty Limited, the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) and E-Cycle Solutions Pty Ltd. Two of the three approved co-regulatory arrangements, DHL Supply Chain and TechCollect/ANZRP, are GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate members.

According to the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment, a Government member of the GlobalPSC:

“A total of 635 collection services, including drop off points at major electronics retailers and local government and other waste facilities, as well as temporary collection events, were provided by the three co-regulatory arrangements between the commencement of the Scheme and the end of June 2013.

“An estimated total of 137,756 tonnes of televisions and computers reached end of life in Australia in 2012–13. Industry’s target under the scheme was to recycle 30 per cent of this amount, or 41,327 tonnes. A total of 40,813 tonnes of recycling was achieved, equivalent to 98.8 per cent of the scheme target and almost double the estimated level of recycling prior to the scheme’s introduction. DHL Supply Chain and E-Cycle Solutions exceeded their recycling targets, while ANZRP fell short of its recycling target. E-waste not covered by the scheme target remained the responsibility of state, territory and local governments. National data is not available on the amount of e-waste recycling that occurred outside the scheme in 2012–13.”

 

Report: Cost-Benefit Study of Extended Producer Responsibility for Packaging and Printed Paper

A cost-benefit study conducted for Recycling Reinvented by Reclay StewardEdge has estimated the total cost of an extended producer responsibility (EPR) model system for consumer packaging and printed paper (PPP) in the US state of Minnesota at US$74.2 million, or an average of US$117 per ton of PPP recycled under the program. System costs for Minnesota’s residential recycling in 2011 are estimated to range between US$61 million and US$74 million, or US$149-182 per ton collected. According to the report, the “estimates suggest that the modeled EPR system could result in a substantial increase in projected tons of consumer PPP collected within approximately the same spending range as under the current system”.

A previous report in the three report series showed that Minnesota could see a 32% increase in recycling of PPP by using an EPR model incorporating harmonization of materials collection, increased single-stream collection, slightly more curbside collection, and an away-from-home recycling program. A statewide recycling rate of 61% could be achieved for recyclable consumer PPP, and a higher rate is possible for household PPP.

The study modeled the effects of EPR in a single state using state-specific data, but Recycling Reinvented hope that the methodology and analysis findings will have broader applicability. The goal of the study is to help advance the national dialogue on how to achieve higher recycling rates, greater system efficiency, and sustainably financed recycling programs.

The first working paper in the series presented the study design, guiding principles, and assumptions. The website MarketBasedRecycling.com was created to house all details of the study for more in-depth information.

Although commissioned by Recycling Reinvented, the study was designed to be objective, rigorous, and transparent. It included an extensive review process by over two dozen experts from industry, non-governmental organizations, education and policy.

 

New GlobalPSC Members and Member Profiles

 

Events Update

The Global Product Stewardship Council is presenting at the following events:

  • 40th Annual RCBC Zero Waste Conference, 28-30 May 2014 in Whistler, Canada
  • WasteMET Asia, 2-4 June 2014 in Singapore

At these events, we will be promoting the involvement of GlobalPSC members and our activities.

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Global Product Stewardship Council

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Tel: +61 2 9489 8851
Fax: +61 2 9489 8553
Email: info@globalpsc.net