Posts Tagged ‘Australia’

An Auspicious Time for Change – Review of Australia’s Product Stewardship Act

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:17 pm, April 26th, 2017Comments0

 

 

Australia’s Product Stewardship Act requires a five-year review that has been announced but has yet to be initiated. Conducting the review as a priority could help address a plethora of social, economic and environmental issues, and result in additional economic development and job creation.

The GlobalPSC will be active in the Act’s review in coordination with the Australian Department of Environment and Energy. GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin recently assessed some of the opportunities for improvement through the review for CWS magazine. This assessment is now available online or as a PDF.

 

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – TIC Mattress Recycling

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:33 pm, June 2nd, 2016Comments0

TIC Mattress Recycling employs world’s best practice to provide sustainable end-of-life mattress recycling. TIC services local governments and mattress retailers to provide high levels of resource recovery.

The company commenced operations in 2013 and has built Australia’s first automated mattress deconstruction facility based on European technology that it has developed further and is now marketing globally.

TIC’s processes ensure maximum resource recovery and environmental controls while minimizing handling and exposure to safety risks.

The company is working closely with mattress manufacturers, retailers, local government and other stakeholders to develop a mattress product stewardship program for Australia. TIC is committed to working with others to establish a mattress stewardship program that shifts costs from local government, encourages innovation, increases resource recovery and is transparent and accountable.

In an industry that has been dogged by poor practices, low resource recovery and boom and bust cycles, TIC Mattress Recycling heralds a new era of advanced and sustainable mattress recycling.

TIC Mattress Recycling is part of the TIC Group. Further details can be found here.

 

National Voluntary Paint Stewardship Scheme Launched in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:04 pm, May 1st, 2016Comments1

[L-R: Master Painter Stephen Papdan; Federal Environment Minister the Hon Greg Hunt MP; Master Painter Damien McRyan; Sustainability Victoria CEO Stan Krpan; Paintback Chief Executive Karen Gomez; Paintback Independent Chairperson Jim Liaskos]

 

Australia has just launched what is believed to be the world’s first, all-encompassing national voluntary stewardship scheme for waste paint* and paint packaging, Paintback. The program, founded by paint producers DuluxGroup, Haymes, PPG, Resene and Valspar, was launched 29 April in Melbourne by the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Australia’s Minister for the Environment.

The program will be funded through a levy of 15 cents per litre (plus GST) on new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.  The levy was approved by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to fund the collection and treatment of waste paint nationally, education campaigns and research for new uses of waste paint by Paintback Ltd, a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the end-of-life management of waste paint and packaging.

Paintback will build upon a range of collaborative efforts between industry and governments. Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister nominated paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 in June 2013. The multi-stakeholder National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the ACCC for approval of the levy.

The GlobalPSC helped facilitate development of the scheme. In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents are available under the Paint category on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

* New Zealand accredited a voluntary paint collection program called Paintwise funded through a voluntary levy on Resene paint sold and from separate fees on non-Resene branded paint and trade waste paint.

 

GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate Member – The Compliance Map Ltd

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:22 pm, March 11th, 2016Comments1

 

Compliance Map develops solutions to help businesses manage their environmental compliance obligations arising from regulations and directives and to help optimize their use of resources. This includes product stewardship responsibilities, reporting and minimization of waste as well as carbon disclosure that will play a significant part in identifying, monitoring and driving down their customer’s global environmental impacts.

Both Product Stewardship and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) regulations and standards are at the core of Compliance Map’s solution offering. This includes mechanisms to collect, store and produce remittance reports required for submission to EPR schemes for directives such as WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment), Battery as well as deposit and worldwide Packaging programmes. The solution offered automatically manages sales warehousing data and combines with relevant Packaging, WEEE, Battery, Oil, Beverage or Paint information to produce costs and weight reports ready to be remitted to registered schemes on a monthly, quarterly or annually basis. This enables companies to automate the entire process by which they track and report waste to schemes and programmes worldwide and make better use of their own resources.

Compliance Map are made of a team of regulatory compliance experts with over 20+ years of experience in the arena of environmental compliance which has been fed into their software solution offerings, creating a holistic approach to managing obligations businesses face in today’s regulatory climate.

 

GlobalPSC Member – Equilibrium

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:43 am, February 29th, 2016Comments2

Equilibrium is a sustainability strategy and consulting company. It provides environmental solutions that cut costs, align organisational goals and enhance reputation. From environmental management systems to technical assessments to strategic advice, Equilibrium’s expertise and experience extends across many sectors of the economy including food manufacturing, stadiums and events, Government, waste management, recycling, agriculture, packaging and facilities management.

Equilibrium has worked extensively in policy and regulatory development, especially in waste and materials efficiency and including product stewardship across a range of schemes and materials. To find out more, visit here.

 

CEO & Business Leaders Summit 2015

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:33 pm, November 24th, 2015Comments1

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GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin was invited to participate again this year in the CEO & Business Leaders Summit in Sydney, Australia. The Summit is a gathering of a global alliance of CEOs, senior executives and experts involved in creating advanced and sustainable projects worldwide. Speakers at the event are shown above and their roles are highlighted here.

Russ’s presentation on global projects and initiatives highlighted some of challenges of managing various wastes, especially for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).  The GlobalPSC’s collaboration with the SMaRT Centre at the University of New South Wales and proposed research on global WEEE models were also addressed. The presentation is available to GlobalPSC members in the Knowledge Base. Other speakers highlighted a range of challenges including changing resource and economic needs in China and South East Asia, opportunities for the circular economy and development of smart cities, sustainable financing, G20 discussions and emerging technologies with an emphasis on medical technologies.

 

Forthcoming Events

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:17 pm, November 16th, 2015Comments0

The GlobalPSC and some of our members will be active in several events in the near future, including:

We’ll highlight key presentations and findings from these events.

Approval for Voluntary National Australian Paint Product Stewardship Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:04 pm, October 29th, 2015Comments1

A voluntary national product stewardship scheme today received regulatory approval for an A$0.15/litre levy to be applied to the sale of new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.

Levy revenue will fund the not-for-profit company Paint Stewardship Ltd to administer all aspects of the collection scheme, including education, marketing and communication, R&D investment, transport and processing of waste paint from trade and domestic sources across the country. The scheme is expected to commence in May 2016.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (the ACCC) today approved the application for authorisation lodged by the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, Paint Stewardship Limited and certain paint manufacturers and wholesalers on 1 July 2015. The ACCC approval of the levy extends through 1 June 2021.

The National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the ACCC for approval of the levy.

The GlobalPSC and several of our members have helped facilitate development of the scheme since Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister’s June 2013 nomination of paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011.

In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents, including today’s determination and rationale for the decision, are available under the Paint category on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

10 Years of Mobile Phone Recycling Insights

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:31 pm, October 22nd, 2015Comments1

The Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA) has released a report into how Australians’ attitudes to mobile phone use and recycling have changed over the past ten years showing that the gap between the number of mobiles used and consumer willingness to reuse and recycle is still excessive.

Despite record awareness of mobile phone recycling, Australians are still reluctant to part with old phones – some of which don’t even work.
“Australians are getting better at recycling, very few phones now go to landfill (down from 9% to 2%) and more and more phones are being recycled and resold.  However, like many countries across the globe the number of phones laying idle in homes has soared, up from 12 million to over 22.5 million in the past decade.  Almost one for every Australian.

“This represents a lost opportunity for reuse and recycling that enables materials to be put back into the supply chain, closing the loop, slowing the depletion of finite non-renewable resources and creating a circular economy,” comments Rose Read, Recycling Manager, MobileMuster (pictured below talking participants through the report’s findings).

“The research suggests that people still consider keeping their phone a better option than recycling even if it doesn’t work, will never be used and they know that it can be recycled. For many people keeping a phone is about having a backup and for more and more people it’s also about data security concerns.  But in reality how many backups do you need?”

Following the report’s launch and discussion of its findings, a panel discussed product stewardship for mobile phones and other electronics, including opportunities and barriers for reuse and recycling.

 

[Panel participants L-R: Peter Brisbane, Director, Stewardship and Waste, Department of Environment; James Chin Moody, Founder and CEO, Sendle; Dr Ruth Lane, School of Social Sciences, Monash University; Matthew Lobb, AMTA Chairman & General Manager, Industry Strategy and Public Policy, Vodafone Hutchison Australia. Not pictured: John Fieschi, Head of Buy Back and Financial Services, Brightstar]

Additional insights, MobileMuster Annual Reports and other publications are available here.

Guest Blog – Battery Stewardship Moves to the Next Stage in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:11 pm, August 13th, 2015Comments4

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Chief Executive of the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI). 

 

At their last meeting in July, Australian Environment Ministers agreed to continue work on an industry-driven stewardship program for handheld batteries but with a focus on hazardous and rechargeable batteries only.

This is a significant win for Energizer, Duracell and the Consumer Electronics Suppliers Association (CESA), who have argued that battery stewardship for primary batteries would need to be regulated to ensure that all suppliers participate. During a Product Stewardship Institute battery recycling webinar (5/6 November 2014) Energizer’s spokesman advised that they had ‘zero tolerance’ for voluntary stewardship but would work with ABRI to develop a regulatory solution.

Handheld batteries are one of only two product categories that are still listed on the national ‘priority list’ for government action under the Product Stewardship Act. That list identifies products that the Minister for the Environment will consider for regulation or accreditation under the Act.

The Queensland Government is leading negotiations on the battery stewardship program on behalf of all government jurisdictions. A discussion paper, released in March 2014, outlined proposals for battery stewardship that were well received by most stakeholders but failed to secure the necessary level of industry support, particularly from primary battery manufacturers.

Following the Ministers’ decision to refine the scope to rechargeable and hazardous batteries only, a more focused proposal is expected to be developed by key industry associations and brand owners in late 2015 for broader consultation. While the exact scope of the stewardship scheme is yet to be defined, it is likely to include all handheld rechargeable batteries weighing less than 5kg as well as primary button cells. Button and coin cells have been the subject of extensive media coverage in Australia over the past two years due to an increasing number of infants and children presenting at hospitals with life threatening injuries associated with batteries.

The Australian Battery Recycling Initiative will continue to advocate for ‘all battery’ recycling services because these offer the most convenient and environmentally-responsible solution for consumers. Existing battery recycling programs, which are funded by state government agencies, local councils and retailers such as ALDI and Battery World, already collect both primary and secondary batteries.

Nevertheless, the establishment of a national, voluntary stewardship scheme for rechargeable batteries would be a welcome development because it would increase industry engagement and improve the availability of recycling services. ABRI is working on a series of pilot projects for particular battery types to inform the design of a national program. The first of these, for power tool batteries, will commence in September this year.

At the same time ABRI will continue to work on regulatory options for primary batteries. These include stand-alone regulations (similar to the model legislation developed by the battery industry in the US) or extension of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme to include primary batteries. If discussions on a voluntary scheme for rechargeable batteries do not reach a successful outcome in 2016 then ABRI will argue that regulations should apply to all handheld batteries.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council.  

Helen Lewis is part-time chief executive of the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative. She has been actively involved in product stewardship initiatives for plastics, packaging and batteries for over 20 years. Helen is a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group

 

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Global Product Stewardship Council

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