Posts Tagged ‘China’

California Packaging Product Stewardship Reform

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:56 pm, October 17th, 2017Comments0

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Roughly 25 percent of California’s disposed waste stream is comprised of packaging materials. While the benefits of packaging are noted, improper management can result in greenhouse gas emissions, waterway and marine debris, and human health impacts.

According to the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle),

“(i)n order to help meet the state’s aggressive 75 percent recycling, composting, and source reduction goal by 2020, and particularly in light of significant recent developments such as the drop in California’s recycling rate and potential implications of China’s expanding regulations to ban certain scrap imports, it is critical now more than ever to address this portion of the waste stream. This will require a higher level of awareness and involvement by all parties involved in the sale and use of packaging: manufacturers, distributors, retailers, local governments, waste haulers, and consumers. After an extensive stakeholder outreach process dating back to 2012, the Director of (CalRecycle) instructed staff at the September 2016 monthly public meeting to develop a comprehensive, mandatory policy model for managing packaging to significantly reduce its presence in the waste stream.”

CalRecycle is seeking additional input on the proposed reforms for packaging.

In draft screening criteria for determining priority packaging types released in July 2017, CalRecycle noted that,

“(g)iven that there is not a one-size-fits-all policy solution for all packaging, the Department is choosing to evaluate which mandatory policy models (e.g., Extended Producer Responsibility, etc.) and instruments (e.g., minimum content, etc.) might be best suited to increasing collection and recovery of specific packaging types. In order to do this, staff are developing a set of screening criteria to determine which packaging types could be prioritized for analysis relative to different mandatory policy approaches.” 

To further advance public consultation on the issue, including an October 2017 workshop, CalRecycle has released a background document to

“solicit stakeholder input on a comprehensive policy framework as a policy model, what the framework should entail, critical steps for how it could work, and how specific policy tools could be implemented within that framework. In addition, staff are seeking feedback on how the framework could be enforced, how CalRecycle could measure progress and success, and how the framework could respond to changes in the marketplace.”‘

The background document contains final screening criteria for packaging based on the draft criteria and public consultation. Stakeholder submissions received prior to the 10 October workshop are also available here.

 

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – Fisher & Paykel Healthcare

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:56 pm, September 7th, 2017Comments0

 

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Fisher & Paykel Healthcare is a world leader in medical devices and systems for use in respiratory care, acute care, surgery and in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

 

Two Weeks to Go! Recycling in a Global Economy – GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:32 am, October 13th, 2014Comments0

Recycling in a Global Economy
SMC Conference & Function Centre, 66 Goulburn Street, Sydney
9:00am to 1:00pm

The Global Product Stewardship Council and its members invite you to our latest thought leadership forum featuring Adam Minter, the author of best-selling book Junkyard Planet. Adam is a third-generation scrap dealer turned journalist who’s spent over a decade living in Asia, examining recycling practices first-hand and sharing his insights.

The GlobalPSC and electronics recycler TES-AMM are pleased to provide this first Australian opportunity to hear and meet Adam Minter. Adam’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Adam and other international experts on the implications of Adam’s insights for Australia. Participants will include:

  • Anna Minns, General Manager TerraCycle Australia & New Zealand
  • John Lingelbach, Executive Director of SERI
  • Justin O’Sullivan, Executive Director – Sales Operations of Dell Australia
  • Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of SMaRT Centre, UNSW Australia
  • John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv Group and Product Stewardship Advisory Group member
  • Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Australian Battery Recycling Initiative Chief Executive

Discussions will be facilitated by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin.

Join us to learn and discuss:

  • How is economic growth in China driving demand for recycled materials?
  • How does the global trade in recyclable materials affect recycling in countries like the US and Australia?
  • How can we ensure responsible recycling practices, particularly for e-waste and plastics?
  • How do changing economic conditions both help and hurt recycling and reuse, especially for electronics?
  • What role will the informal sector play in the future of recycling?
  • What are the implications of global material flows for product stewardship?
  • What are incentives and drivers for incorporating Design for Environment and the circular economy in product stewardship?

Registrations are $275 (GST-incl) for non-members of the GlobalPSC and $125 (GST-incl) for GlobalPSC members. Registration and payment information is available here. A light lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

Proudly sponsored by TES-AMM, DellTechCollect and SERI.

 

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Guest Blog – E-waste Recycling in Developing and Emerging Economies: the Importance of Working with the Informal Sector

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:06 pm, September 23rd, 2014Comments4

Brett Giddings crThe Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Brett Giddings, currently undertaking a PhD at UNSW focussed on e-waste and Manager, Member Services at the Australian Packaging Covenant.

The rate of ownership, and ultimately disposal of, electronic devices continues to increase year on year; the StEP Initiative estimating that 48.9 million tonnes of e-waste was produced worldwide in 2012, a figure that is set to increase to more than 65 million tonnes by 2017.

At the same time, devices such as mobile phones, laptops and televisions are becoming increasingly complex and challenging to recycle at end-of-life. Recycling the mix of valuable materials within this growing heterogeneous waste stream is important, but simply collecting products from consumers does not ensure recovery.

As highlighted by Adam Minter (keynote at the next GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum) in his 2013 book Junkyard Planet, inevitably some e-waste is shipped to locations where the manual labour, often better suited to dismantling complex products, is more cost-effective and within closer proximity to the manufacturers that will ultimately use the materials recovered. On face value, it is difficult for the public to support e-waste flows to these markets. While the situation is reported to be improving, the environmental and health impacts associated with poor e-waste recycling practices employed by the informal sector are well-documented, legitimate concerns with a quick Google search conjuring up images of youths burning PVC sheaths from copper wires and factory workers sitting in piles of broken CRT TVs and monitors.

Parallel to regulatory responses to these impacts is a growth in industry-lead supply chain transparency and certification, yet still the flows of waste (at times illegally) continue, and ultimately find their way to the informal sector. There have been many calls to stop the export of e-waste to regions that involve the informal sector, however there are inherent social benefits and value creation opportunities that should be considered and accounted for. These include the dramatic rises in ownership of refurbished electronic devices in these regions and the resultant social benefits that this access affords. At the same time, the developing world is producing its own increasing volumes of e-waste, with China now outstripping even the US in terms of total tonnes of e-waste produced each year. “Cutting and running”, as with many complex supply chain problems, is not the answer.

The viability of e-waste recycling is underpinned by the availability of high-value materials, including copper, gold, silver and palladium and the ease with which these materials can be separated and recovered from the units within which they are embedded. New, low-impact, practical and place-relevant solutions are required; solutions that mitigate the health and environmental impacts associated with practices such as chemical leaching and open copper wire burning, while maximising employment opportunities and resource recovery.

There is no right or wrong approach, but solutions should be systematic, linking effective manual recycling processes with the high-tech, environmentally sound, formal sector. They should be complementary rather than competing, also able to run in parallel and coexist with the formal sector, and empower both individual operators and those working in cooperative arrangements. One example is the East Africa Compliant Recycling operation in Kenya. Supported by Dell, HP, Microsoft and Philips, collectors are able to deliver electronic goods and receive fair payment. Electronic items are then manually sorted, dismantled, packed and shipped locally or globally for recycling.

Other solutions are technology-focussed. The Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology (SMaRT Centre) at UNSW, has demonstrated that processing printed circuit boards using pyrolysis at high temperatures in an inert atmosphere can be utilised to recover high-value material fractions in a manner that mitigates both the health and environmental impacts often associated with small-scale processing. Currently laboratory-based, I am involved in a research project to explore the viability of this technologies’ use by the informal sector and in an environment where waste streams are far from consistent, evolving with each product iteration. Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of the SMaRT Centre, will be discussing this project and others as a panellist at the GlobalPSC’s next Thought Leadership Forum.

 

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council.

With a background in product development and environmental management, Brett Giddings has held roles that span the full lifecycle of products; from design through to recycling. Currently undertaking a PhD at UNSW focussed on e-waste, Brett is also the Manager, Member Services at the Australia Packaging Covenant. He has worked in local government in a waste management role, contracted to several environmental consultancies, held a research position at UNSW and was Visy’s Product Sustainability Manager.

Recycling in a Global Economy – GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:48 pm, July 31st, 2014Comments6

Recycling in a Global Economy
SMC Conference & Function Centre, 66 Goulburn Street, Sydney
9:00am to 1:00pm

The Global Product Stewardship Council and its members invite you to our latest thought leadership forum featuring Adam Minter, the author of best-selling book Junkyard Planet. Adam is a third-generation scrap dealer turned journalist who’s spent over a decade living in Asia, examining recycling practices first-hand and sharing his insights.

The GlobalPSC and electronics recycler TES-AMM are pleased to provide this first Australian opportunity to hear and meet Adam Minter. Adam’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Adam and other international experts on the implications of Adam’s insights for Australia. Participants will include:

  • Anna Minns, General Manager TerraCycle Australia & New Zealand
  • John Lingelbach, Executive Director of SERI
  • Justin O’Sullivan, Executive Director – Sales Operations of Dell Australia
  • Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of SMaRT Centre, UNSW Australia
  • John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv Group and Product Stewardship Advisory Group member
  • Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Australian Battery Recycling Initiative Chief Executive

Discussions will be facilitated by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin.

Join us to learn and discuss:

  • How is economic growth in China driving demand for recycled materials?
  • How does the global trade in recyclable materials affect recycling in countries like the US and Australia?
  • How can we ensure responsible recycling practices, particularly for e-waste and plastics?
  • How do changing economic conditions both help and hurt recycling and reuse, especially for electronics?
  • What role will the informal sector play in the future of recycling?
  • What are the implications of global material flows for product stewardship?
  • What are incentives and drivers for incorporating Design for Environment and the circular economy in product stewardship?

Registrations are $275 (GST-incl) for non-members of the GlobalPSC and $125 (GST-incl) for GlobalPSC members. Registration and payment information is available here. A light lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

Proudly sponsored by TES-AMM, DellTechCollect and SERI.

 

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Shifting the Burden of Recycling: Yale Journal Explores the State of Extended Producer Responsibility

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:14 pm, May 1st, 2013Comments1

By Reid Lifset, Editor-in-chief
Journal of Industrial Ecology
Over the past two decades governments around the world have been experimenting with a new strategy for managing waste. By making producers responsible for their products when they become wastes, policy makers seek to significantly increase the recycling­-and recyclability­-of computers, packaging, automobiles, and household hazardous wastes such as batteries, used oil motor, and leftover paint­-and save money in the process.

This strategy, known as extended producer responsibility (EPR), is the subject of a new special feature in Yale University’s Journal of Industrial Ecology. The special feature examines the use of EPR across diverse scales-­from countries to provinces and states­-and investigates work underway in the U.S., the European Union, Canada, China, Brazil and the State of Washington. The application of EPR to e-waste is a particular focus of the research in the special feature.

The Journal of Industrial Ecology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, owned by Yale University, published by Wiley-Blackwell and headquartered at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Articles in the special feature are freely downloadable for a limited time here.

Partial support for this special feature was provided by Nestle Waters North America with additional funding from Reverse Logistics Group Americas LLC.

2012 Chemical Regulatory Review and Predictions for 2013 – China, Japan, Korea and Other Country/Region

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:03 pm, February 5th, 2013Comments0

ChemLink has released the report ’2012 Chemical Regulatory Review and Predictions for 2013 – China, Japan, Korea and Other Country/Region’. The report is available in English-Chinese bilingual format.

New GlobalPSC Corporate Member – ARCOA

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:28 pm, January 4th, 2013Comments1

 

 

 

 

ARCOA has become one of the latest multinational Corporate Members of the Global Product Stewardship Council.

ARCOA is an ISO14001 and R2 certified recycler of electronics. Services provided to customers include Compliance and Risk Management, Asset Management, Investment Recovery and Technology Recycling. Under the umbrella of holding company the ARCOA Group, ARCOA operates facilities in the United States, Chile, Hong Kong and China.

ARCOA is committed to environmental sustainability through comprehensive programs of remarketing, de-manufacturing, component recovery, recycling and refining of used and end of life electronics.

ARCOA is committed to a sustainable future and to offering services that are socially responsible and to conduct business in an ethical manner. ARCOA’s ethics and social responsibility are built around the recognition that everything done in connection with their work is measured against the highest possible standards.

R2 recyclers adhere to stringent environmental, health, safety and security requirements and ensure that toxic material streams are managed safely, responsibly, and legally by downstream vendors – all the way to final disposition. ARCOA earned ISO 14001 certification in 2011. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is the world’s largest developer and publisher of international standards.

George Hinkle, President and Founder of ARCOA, was recently invited to Washington DC by the American Chemical Society to brief Congressional staffers on the benefits of recycling electronics. George’s presentation and several others are available here.

GlobalPSC 2012 Highlights and Holiday Greetings

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:35 pm, December 21st, 2012Comments0

 

 

 

2012 was a pretty active year for the Global Product Stewardship Council. Some of the GlobalPSC’s 2012 highlights include:

MEMBERSHIP GROWTH

MEMBERSHIP SERVICES

  • Expanded our Knowledge Base and developed a new program database for GlobalPSC members
  • Expanded social media and networking opportunities including:
    • converted our website to WordPress to better share information
    • developed a newsletter with general articles as well as more detailed information for GlobalPSC members
    • created member profiles
    • an email distribution list of over 400 interested parties
    • discussions with over 670 members from 37 countries in a public forum on LinkedIn
    • increased presence through Twitter, Facebook, Youtube and our home page

OUTREACH ACHIEVEMENTS

  • Appointment to the Australian Government’s Product Stewardship Advisory Group, to provide independent advice to the government on products that could be considered for attention under the Product Stewardship Act 2011
  • Provided the Council’s perspective through presentations and participation in events in China, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand
  • Started facilitating business case, public policy rationale and stakeholder engagement for paint and battery product stewardship initiatives for Sustainability Victoria
  • Facilitated and posted a video on the business case for Panasonic’s approach to product stewardship in Australia and internationally
  • Conducted a sustainable packaging breakfast series with the Sustainable Packaging Alliance

We’d like to thank everyone that’s made such an eventful 2012 possible, especially our members, speakers and attendees at GlobalPSC events.

We’d also like to extend our best wishes over the holidays and wish you a happy and prosperous 2013.

Select Proceedings from Electronics Recycling Asia in Guangzhou, China

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:23 pm, November 27th, 2012Comments0

 

 

 

 

In November 2012, the Global Product Stewardship Council attended the Electronics Recycling Asia event in Guangzhou, China. Select presentations from the event have been posted on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members, with the consent of the presenters.

The presentations posted include (in no particular order):

  • The Principles of Proper Regulation by Crystynna Ewe of Dell in Singapore
  • Sustaining Electronics Recycling Globally: Key Ingredients to a Successful Market by Robin K. Wiener of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc. in the US
  • How does Taiwan Recycle Electronics Waste? by Prof. Hsiao-Kang Ma of the National Taiwan University Department of Mechanical Engineering in Taiwan
  • Rare Earth Recovery from Urban Mines: Recycling of Luminescent Powder from Fluorescent Lamps by Thomas Langer of OSRAM AG in Germany
  • European WEEE Recycling Standard – What will the EU WEEELABEX Standard Require of Global Recyclers? by Julie-Ann Adams of Really Green Credentials Ltd in the United Kingdom
  • Development of Total Recycling Technologies for Flat Panel Display Devices by Dr Hyun Seon Hong, of the Institute for Advanced Engineering in Korea
  • Electronic Product Stewardship in Australia and New Zealand by Russ Martin of the GlobalPSC

GlobalPSC members can log in to the Knowledge Base via the Members tab at www.globalpsc.net.

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Email: info@globalpsc.net