Posts Tagged ‘circular economy’

Building Roads with Plastic Bags and Glass

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:09 pm, August 3rd, 2018Comments0

 

 

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The GlobalPSC joined one of our Sustaining Corporate Members, Close the Loop, and other stakeholders for the launch of the first road in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, built from soft plastics and glass.

The road, in the Sutherland Shire, incorporated soft plastics (equal to 176,000 plastic bags), glass (equal to over 55,000 glass bottles), toner from almost 4,000 toner cartridges and 66 tonnes of asphalt from reclaimed roads.

Infrastructure service provider Downer notes that the road product, called Plastiphalt, is cost competitive and has a 65 per cent improvement in fatigue life, as well as increased resistance to deformation. These characteristics allow Plastiphalt roads to last longer and to better handle heavy vehicle traffic.

Nerida Mortlock, General Manager of Close the Loop Australia, noted, “Our close partnership with Downer, along with our collaborative partnerships with RedCycle and Plastic Police has allowed us to design, develop and manufacture sustainable products using problematic waste  streams. We are very pleased to see soft plastics used for the first time in a NSW road”.

 

Australian Senate Recommends Stronger Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:54 pm, June 30th, 2018Comments0

 

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An Australian Senate inquiry into waste and recycling has recommended shifting from Australia’s traditional preference for voluntary product stewardship to greater introduction of mandatory schemes.

The inquiry’s final report contained a number of recommendations specific to product stewardship, including:

  • prioritising the establishment of a circular economy.
  • a national container deposit scheme.
  • making Australia’s product stewardship schemes under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 mandatory.
  • mandatory schemes for tyres, mattresses, e-waste and photovoltaic panels.
  • re-establishment of the Product Stewardship Advisory Group.
  • a phase-out of petroleum-based single-use plastics by 2023.
In accordance with an original intent of extended producer responsibility, the inquiry recommended “that the Australian Government extend producer responsibility under product stewardship schemes to ensure better environmental and social outcomes through improved design”.

Some of the related measures recommended by the inquiry include:

  • strengthening various aspects of the National Waste Report.
  • targets for recycled content.
  • promotion of sustainable procurement policies.
  • reaffirmation of the waste hierarchy, with waste reduction and recycling prioritised over energy from waste.

Plastic pollution, particularly plastics in marine environments, are also highlighted in the inquiry, with recommendations including establishment of a Plastics Co-Operative Research Centre to lead Australia’s research efforts into reducing plastic waste and a recommitment to recommendations of an earlier Senate inquiry into the threat of marine plastic pollution in Australia.

Participants in the GlobalPSC’s International Stewardship Forum contributed to the inquiry and various recommendations from the Forum are reflected in the final report and recommendations.

 

2015 U.S. Product Stewardship Forum: Extended Producer Responsibility and the Circular Economy

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:54 pm, November 16th, 2015Comments2

On December 8 & 9, the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) will host environmental sustainability experts from around the world at a conference in Boston to celebrate and assess 15 years of EPR in the U.S.; discuss national and global trends in product stewardship, zero waste, recycling, and the circular economy; and examine future challenges and opportunities for increasing recovery of materials in consumer products. This interactive, discussion-based event is an excellent way to join national and international conversations about the evolving ideas and concepts that shape the work we share.

The conference agenda features world-class speakers that will discuss key issues in product stewardship, the role of regulation in a circular economy, and best practices and key strategies for implementing successful EPR programs. Join us there for a new perspective on how we think about and manage “waste”. Register for the conference here and reserve your hotel room here.

 

Delivering Resource-Efficient Products in Europe

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:22 pm, March 31st, 2015Comments1

The European Environment Bureau (EEB), a federation of environmental citizens’ organisations, has released a report on how ecodesign can drive a circular economy in Europe through resource-efficient products.

Drawing from a range of research, the report highlights some of the broader life-cycle and resource implications of products sold in Europe:

  • 40% of all the raw materials used in the EU were sourced elsewhere. For some raw material categories like metal ores, the import dependency is over 90% (Eurostat 2014).
  • Increasing resource productivity by 2% per year could create two million extra jobs in the EU by 2030 (European Commission 2014).
  • Stimulating economic activity in the areas of product development, remanufacturing and refurbishment would provide net material cost savings to EU manufacturing worth up to €410-490 billion per year by 2025 (Ellen MacArthur Foundation 2013).
  • Selected electrical and electronic devices placed on the EU market over one year cause the equivalent of 1,500 million tonnes of CO2 emissions over their lifecycle, equal to the entire energy production of the UK, Germany and Poland combined (EEB).

The report highlights three options that can be combined to reduce resource use in products:

  • identifying design requirements that support better repairability and durability of products;
  • ensuring that selected materials in products are managed carefully from production to end-of-life, including options to use high shares of recycled content and support their high-quality recyclability;
 and
  • removing problematic or hazardous substances undermining the potential for re-using material from products.

Since 2005, design decisions on many energy-using products have been regulated under the EU Ecodesign Directive, with a focus on reducing energy consumption during usage and little emphasis on resource use. The EEB report argues that the relative weight of greenhouse gas emissions embedded in products will grow when looking at a product’s emissions over its life-cycle, resulting in a gradual shift in the attention of policy-makers from the usage phase to the design and production phase of products.

 

Packaging Discussions Focus on Circular Economy, Free-riders and Competition

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:06 am, March 1st, 2015Comments1

2015-02-24 20.30.36(L-R: Ullar Huik of ETO, Helmut Schmitz of Duales System Holding GmbH, Joacim Quoden of EXPRA and Seamus Clancy of Repak)

The GlobalPSC and several of our members addressed a range of packaging extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship issues for packaging and printed paper in Brussels, Belgium, late February as part of the EPR Toolkit Seminar and Packaging Waste & Sustainability Forum.

Joachim Quoden, Managing Director of the Extended Producer Responsibility Alliance (EXPRA)  and member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group, chaired the EPR Toolkit Seminar on 24 February. The seminar emphasised harmonising EPR rules and guidelines in Europe, learning from international experience (including lessons on Australia by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin and Canada by Chris van Rossem of the Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance) and the roles of transparency and competition.

The roles of packaging and EPR in the Circular Economy and in ensuring transparency and accountability of producers were hot topics of discussion throughout the events, analysis of which will be made available to GlobalPSC members.

European Commission Withdraws Circular Economy Package

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:22 pm, December 21st, 2014Comments0

In an expected move, the European Commission has withdrawn the Circular Economy Package from consideration, with the package likely to be revisited in around one year.

The Commission normally proposes around 130 initiatives a year, but has committed to adopting 23 targeted initiatives in 2015.

In Questions and Answers: the 2015 Work Programme, the Commission states,

“In some cases the Commission is proposing to withdraw proposals in order to replace them subsequently by more ambitious proposals or to tailor them more closely to its ten priorities (for example to present a new proposal with a broader approach on the circular economy to meet our ambitions in a more effective way).”

The GlobalPSC will continue to follow Circular Economy developments closely and share insights.

Two Weeks to Go! Recycling in a Global Economy – GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:32 am, October 13th, 2014Comments0

Recycling in a Global Economy
SMC Conference & Function Centre, 66 Goulburn Street, Sydney
9:00am to 1:00pm

The Global Product Stewardship Council and its members invite you to our latest thought leadership forum featuring Adam Minter, the author of best-selling book Junkyard Planet. Adam is a third-generation scrap dealer turned journalist who’s spent over a decade living in Asia, examining recycling practices first-hand and sharing his insights.

The GlobalPSC and electronics recycler TES-AMM are pleased to provide this first Australian opportunity to hear and meet Adam Minter. Adam’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Adam and other international experts on the implications of Adam’s insights for Australia. Participants will include:

  • Anna Minns, General Manager TerraCycle Australia & New Zealand
  • John Lingelbach, Executive Director of SERI
  • Justin O’Sullivan, Executive Director – Sales Operations of Dell Australia
  • Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of SMaRT Centre, UNSW Australia
  • John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv Group and Product Stewardship Advisory Group member
  • Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Australian Battery Recycling Initiative Chief Executive

Discussions will be facilitated by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin.

Join us to learn and discuss:

  • How is economic growth in China driving demand for recycled materials?
  • How does the global trade in recyclable materials affect recycling in countries like the US and Australia?
  • How can we ensure responsible recycling practices, particularly for e-waste and plastics?
  • How do changing economic conditions both help and hurt recycling and reuse, especially for electronics?
  • What role will the informal sector play in the future of recycling?
  • What are the implications of global material flows for product stewardship?
  • What are incentives and drivers for incorporating Design for Environment and the circular economy in product stewardship?

Registrations are $275 (GST-incl) for non-members of the GlobalPSC and $125 (GST-incl) for GlobalPSC members. Registration and payment information is available here. A light lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

Proudly sponsored by TES-AMM, DellTechCollect and SERI.

 

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UNIDO and Dell Cooperate on E-waste Solutions in Africa, Asia and Latin America

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:10 pm, September 29th, 2014Comments1

The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and Dell (a GlobalPSC Corporate Member) have signed an agreement to cooperate on identifying and implementing a sustainable solution model for e-waste management for developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Developing countries are expected to account for the majority of discarded electronics by 2016, and twice that of developed regions by 2030.

The memorandum of understanding signed by UNIDO’s Director General LI Yong and Dell Inc.’s Executive Director of Sustainability David Lear (pictured below with Jean Cox-Kearns, Director of Compliance – Dell Global Takeback), commits the two organizations to work together for a five-year period, with an option to extend the partnership.

“Enabling recycling infrastructure in developing countries has significant benefits for the environment and local community, and facilitates Dell with the recovery of valuable resources currently being discarded. Together with UNIDO we will work to establish or up-scale facilities to operate environmentally sound management practices that meet international standards for e-waste recycling and further powers the circular economy for IT,” said Lear.

Lear added, “We are going to continue to support governments in developing effective regulations and policies for e-waste management. Since policy development is a multi-stage process, Dell and UNIDO will support governments in the dialogue and dissemination activities to accompany the various stages of policy development, and this will include organizing and participating in consultation meetings with major stakeholder groups representing industry associations, civil society groups, formal and informal sector collectors, recyclers and representative associations.”

Through the collaboration, UNIDO and Dell aim to create awareness, build capacity, and engage in knowledge sharing and policy advocacy with regard to sustainable e-waste management; to support the creation of an operational and economically viable collection network, and dismantling and recycling facilities, to process e-waste in developing countries in a safe and environmentally sound way; and to support the development of local recycling infrastructure, contributing to the industrial development of these countries and creating sustainable, green economies.

UNIDO has an established e-waste program that addresses the full life cycle of ICT equipment by properly dismantling and recycling it once the equipment has become obsolete. The program aims to foster the development of an environmentally sound e-waste recycling industry in developing countries.

With the active support of 35 National Cleaner Production Centres, UNIDO focuses on promoting an environmental service industry in developing countries; preparing national e-waste assessment reports; establishing partnerships with national and international institutions from the public and private sector; and facilitating the establishment of local and regional e-waste dismantling and recycling facilities.

Dell began integrating sustainability features into its products and processes nearly 30 years ago with designs that were upgradable, serviceable and recyclable because it was good for business, customers, and the environment. Dell is building on this commitment through its recently launched Legacy of Good plan outlining its vision for 2020. As part of this plan, Dell has a goal to eliminate two billion pounds of used electronics by 2020, which will be achieved through Dell’s recycling programs for homes and businesses in 78 countries.

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – Dell

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:38 pm, August 21st, 2014Comments7

Dell was founded in 1984 by Michael Dell from his dorm room at the University of Texas in Austin, and today he is the longest-tenured executive to lead a company in the computer industry. Dell is a premier provider of products and services worldwide that enable customers to build their information technology and Internet infrastructures. Dell offers a broad range of products in the following categories: desktop computer systems, servers and networking products, mobility products, software and peripherals and services.

Dell Inc. is currently headquartered in Round Rock, Texas, United States of America. Dell Inc. operates worldwide and its subsidiaries develop, design, manufacture, market and sell computers and services, software and peripherals to customers worldwide. The company sells its technology to a variety of customers – consumers, public customers, large enterprises and small- and medium-sized businesses. In 2014, Dell launched a new closed-loop process where plastics for new product manufacturing are sourced by waste electronics collected from customers. By keeping the plastics within the ‘closed-loop,’ Dell puts them back to work, fueling the circular economy for IT. By doing this Dell helps to drive a “circular economy”.

Dell was honored with the 2015 Accenture Award for “Circular Economy Pioneer” at the Circular Awards during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The award recognizes established organizations demonstrating existing business innovation that supports a circular economy, which aims to decouple economic growth from the use of natural resources and ecosystems by using resources more effectively.

 

Recycling in a Global Economy – GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:48 pm, July 31st, 2014Comments6

Recycling in a Global Economy
SMC Conference & Function Centre, 66 Goulburn Street, Sydney
9:00am to 1:00pm

The Global Product Stewardship Council and its members invite you to our latest thought leadership forum featuring Adam Minter, the author of best-selling book Junkyard Planet. Adam is a third-generation scrap dealer turned journalist who’s spent over a decade living in Asia, examining recycling practices first-hand and sharing his insights.

The GlobalPSC and electronics recycler TES-AMM are pleased to provide this first Australian opportunity to hear and meet Adam Minter. Adam’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Adam and other international experts on the implications of Adam’s insights for Australia. Participants will include:

  • Anna Minns, General Manager TerraCycle Australia & New Zealand
  • John Lingelbach, Executive Director of SERI
  • Justin O’Sullivan, Executive Director – Sales Operations of Dell Australia
  • Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of SMaRT Centre, UNSW Australia
  • John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv Group and Product Stewardship Advisory Group member
  • Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Australian Battery Recycling Initiative Chief Executive

Discussions will be facilitated by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin.

Join us to learn and discuss:

  • How is economic growth in China driving demand for recycled materials?
  • How does the global trade in recyclable materials affect recycling in countries like the US and Australia?
  • How can we ensure responsible recycling practices, particularly for e-waste and plastics?
  • How do changing economic conditions both help and hurt recycling and reuse, especially for electronics?
  • What role will the informal sector play in the future of recycling?
  • What are the implications of global material flows for product stewardship?
  • What are incentives and drivers for incorporating Design for Environment and the circular economy in product stewardship?

Registrations are $275 (GST-incl) for non-members of the GlobalPSC and $125 (GST-incl) for GlobalPSC members. Registration and payment information is available here. A light lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

Proudly sponsored by TES-AMM, DellTechCollect and SERI.

 

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