Posts Tagged ‘computer’

Australia Consults on Potential Regulatory Changes to TV and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:40 pm, April 29th, 2015Comments1

DSC_1929The Australian Department of Environment is consulting on potential regulatory changes to the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme. Possible changes include revised recovery targets, changes to conversion factors and scaling factors affecting liability under the scheme, and making the Australian Standard 5377 for the management and recycling of certain electrical and electronic items mandatory. A brief discussion paper has been made available, and comments are invited until close of business 7 May, Australia time.

 

Australia Conducts Operational Review of National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:52 pm, December 2nd, 2014Comments2

Australia is conducting an operational review of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (the scheme). Australia’s Minister for the Environment, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, announced the scheme’s review on 22 September 2014. A fact sheet and discussion paper on the review are now available. The Department of the Environment has invited submissions on the operational review by 6 February 2015.

The scheme was established nearly three years ago to achieve the following key objectives:

  • Recycle televisions and computers rather than landfill them.
  • Build on existing e-waste management activities across Australia, including ongoing activities by private and charitable recyclers and state and local government efforts.
  • Implement a progressively higher annual recycling target to increase television and computer recycling to 80 per cent within 10 years.
  • To incentivise investment, increase capacity and create employment within the recycling industry in Australia.

First Year Outcomes for Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:59 am, March 31st, 2014Comments1

Australia has released a report on the first year outcomes of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS or Scheme).

Reports have also been made publicly available for the three approved co-regulatory arrangements that were operational in 2012–13: DHL Supply Chain (Australia) Pty Limited, the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) and E-Cycle Solutions Pty Ltd. Two of the three approved co-regulatory arrangements, DHL Supply Chain and TechCollect/ANZRP, are GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate members.

According to the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment, a Government member of the GlobalPSC:

“A total of 635 collection services, including drop off points at major electronics retailers and local government and other waste facilities, as well as temporary collection events, were provided by the three co-regulatory arrangements between the commencement of the Scheme and the end of June 2013.

“An estimated total of 137,756 tonnes of televisions and computers reached end of life in Australia in 2012–13. Industry’s target under the scheme was to recycle 30 per cent of this amount, or 41,327 tonnes. A total of 40,813 tonnes of recycling was achieved, equivalent to 98.8 per cent of the scheme target and almost double the estimated level of recycling prior to the scheme’s introduction. DHL Supply Chain and E-Cycle Solutions exceeded their recycling targets, while ANZRP fell short of its recycling target. E-waste not covered by the scheme target remained the responsibility of state, territory and local governments. National data is not available on the amount of e-waste recycling that occurred outside the scheme in 2012–13.”

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – TechCollect

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:29 am, July 30th, 2013Comments11

TechCollect Logo & Line - 4 Colour Version Feb 2013

 

TechCollect is an Australia-wide recycling service for old computer and accessories, printers and TVs. It is part of a big effort by industry and the Australian government to reduce the amount of electronic waste that goes into landfill through the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.

TechCollect is funded by some of the world’s leading technology importers and manufacturers, and was set up by the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP), the only not-for-profit e-waste recycling service approved by the government under the Scheme.

Some key outcomes under the Scheme include:

  • Give all Australians reasonable access to an e-waste collection service by December 2013;
  • Increase recycling of e-waste diverted from landfill from 10-17% to 30% in the first year;
  • Aim to increase recycling of e-waste to 80% by the year 2021–2022; and
  • Ensure that 90% of raw materials are recovered during the recycling process for reuse.

The TechCollect program provides the Australian community with services that enable them to safely dispose of their e-waste and have it recycled for free.

ANZRP is required to collect and recycle a specific volume of e-waste each financial year and provide ‘reasonable access’ to e-waste collection services across Australia, as defined by regulation. The target is calculated from the volume to be recycled (liability) for the scheme based on the number of televisions and computers and their peripherals that are manufactured and imported in Australia each year. ANZRP’s volume is then determined from this and is based on the volume imported and manufactured by its members (as liable parties). As at 30 June 2014, ANZRP had successfully met its volume and ‘reasonable access’ targets for the second year of the scheme.

Liable parties may also run their own recycling programs – known as Individual Producer Responsibility programs (IPR). The volume of e-waste recycled from these programs is reported through the ANZRP/TechCollect. The volume from the IPR counts towards the volume of e-waste TechCollect must collect and recycle.

TechCollect ensures its recycling standards focus on keeping old technology out of landfill in Australia and overseas, and protecting the health and safety of workers.

All products collected by TechCollect are recycled. They are broken down in Australia into their individual parts and materials. The components and materials are then processed so that the valuable resources can be recovered and reused when manufacturing new products.

ANZRP evolved from the joint work of the AIIA Environmental Special Interest Group (ESIG) members being 13 major IT brands and the PSA (Product Stewardship Association formed by CESA) representing the major TV brands. This group representing industry played a significant role in the formation of the Product Stewardship Act and Regulations and in the development of the Interim Industry Standard.  ANZRP’s establishment has been funded by the AIIA ESIG members and has their full support.

 

Shifting the Burden of Recycling: Yale Journal Explores the State of Extended Producer Responsibility

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:14 pm, May 1st, 2013Comments1

By Reid Lifset, Editor-in-chief
Journal of Industrial Ecology
Over the past two decades governments around the world have been experimenting with a new strategy for managing waste. By making producers responsible for their products when they become wastes, policy makers seek to significantly increase the recycling­-and recyclability­-of computers, packaging, automobiles, and household hazardous wastes such as batteries, used oil motor, and leftover paint­-and save money in the process.

This strategy, known as extended producer responsibility (EPR), is the subject of a new special feature in Yale University’s Journal of Industrial Ecology. The special feature examines the use of EPR across diverse scales-­from countries to provinces and states­-and investigates work underway in the U.S., the European Union, Canada, China, Brazil and the State of Washington. The application of EPR to e-waste is a particular focus of the research in the special feature.

The Journal of Industrial Ecology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, owned by Yale University, published by Wiley-Blackwell and headquartered at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Articles in the special feature are freely downloadable for a limited time here.

Partial support for this special feature was provided by Nestle Waters North America with additional funding from Reverse Logistics Group Americas LLC.

Making Meaningful Comparisons Between Electronics Product Stewardship Programs

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:36 pm, April 30th, 2013Comments1

     

 

 

In April 2013 DHL Supply Chain, an approved co-regulatory arrangement under Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (Scheme), operator of the Drop Zone program and Global Product Stewardship Council Sustaining Corporate member, held a workshop in Sydney for liable parties under the Scheme. DHL is holding a similar workshop early May in Melbourne.

As part of our ongoing efforts to draw meaningful lessons from international experience, the GlobalPSC is conducting further research into comparing recycling rates and costs of recycling between product stewardship and EPR programs. DHL invited the GlobalPSC’s Russ Martin to preview the GlobalPSC’s research on making meaningful comparisons between electronics product stewardship programs.

The presentation, posted in the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members, addresses producer responsibility programs for electronics in the US, Canada and Europe, discusses the challenges in comparing costs of electronics programs, provides several case studies and explores market trends for electronics.

Australia Seeks Feedback on Amendments to National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:09 pm, April 17th, 2013Comments1

The Australian Government today released a discussion paper which proposes amendments to the regulations governing the administration of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.

Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP said the public consultation period offers an opportunity for interested parties to help build on the early success of the scheme.

“The discussion paper is based on the experiences gained during the scheme’s first year of operation and on feedback from the television and computer industry organisations running the scheme,” Ms Rishworth said.

“Given its ground-breaking nature, we commenced the scheme anticipating that operational experiences would identify further opportunities to fine-tune and enhance the scheme as it matured. After twelve months the signs are that the scheme is progressing well, and by monitoring the roll-out closely we’ve been able to identify some enhancements to strengthen it further.”

Through its own analysis, together with broad stakeholder feedback, the government has identified four key areas where the scheme could be further enhanced.

These are:

  • better matching of product codes and conversion factors (as assisted by MS2)
  • strengthening the capacity of co-regulatory arrangements (including DHL Supply Chain) to manage risk
  • simplifying administrative processes for e-waste collection and recycling
  • aligning the scheme’s activities more closely with the waste stream and the community’s requirements for recycling.

To address these areas, the government is proposing amendments to the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations 2011, with effect from 1 July 2013.

Ms Rishworth said the government is pleased with the roll out and the initial success of the scheme.

“Since commencing on-ground activity in May 2012, thousands of tonnes of unwanted televisions and computers have already been recycled and over two hundred collection services have been established across Australia.”

“The scheme is achieving what it was set up to do—reduce the amount of e-waste going to landfill by providing householders and small business with free access to recycling services across the country—and these amendments will ensure its continued success.”

As part of a possible second phase of amendments to take place after 30 June 2014, the consultation is also seeking views on whether there is benefit in extending the scope of the scheme to cover similar electronic products, such as home entertainment equipment including video cassette recorders, DVD players, set top boxes, video game consoles and stereo equipment; refining the calculation of the total ‘waste arising’ and further refining product codes and conversion factors.

The discussion paper is available here.

Submissions are due by 7 May and can be submitted to ewaste@environment.gov.au.

Stakeholder forums will be held during April and May 2013 to discuss the proposed amendments. Dates and venues for the stakeholder forums will be available on the department’s website at www.environment.gov.au/ewaste.

The National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is industry funded and run, but regulated by the Australian Government under the landmark Product Stewardship Act 2011.

Information from media release by The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP dated 17 April 2013 titled Amendments to National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme released for public comment.

Convergence of Product Stewardship and Zero Waste at Zero Waste Summit

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:34 am, November 9th, 2012Comments0

Australia’s Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, Senator the Hon Don Farrell, addresses the Zero Waste Summit in Melbourne, Australia. Senator Farrell, who led the passage through Parliament of Australia’s Product Stewardship Act 2011, cited bipartisan support for the Act and updated attendees on product stewardship developments in Australia, including the new TV and computer recycling scheme.

Global Product Stewardship Council President Russ Martin chaired the first day of the Zero Waste Summit and presented the GlobalPSC perspective on global developments in product stewardship. Other speakers on product stewardship included representatives of the Australian Government, Fuji Xerox, ANZRP and Australian Packaging Covenant. The GlobalPSC was a proud supporter of the Summit.

The Australian Government has worked in collaboration with the GlobalPSC, from being one of the GlobalPSC’s first government members and an International Speaker Sponsor for the inaugural International Product Stewardship Summit, to seeking GlobalPSC input into the development of product stewardship legislation. We are certainly grateful for the Australian Government’s ongoing support.

Product Stewardship Panel at Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo 22 November 2012

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:38 pm, September 11th, 2012Comments2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Global Product Stewardship Council is pleased to be partnering with the Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo (AWRE) to hold a panel discussion on product stewardship implementation. The panel has now sold out prior to the event.

The panel will help attendees understand some of the opportunities and challenges of product stewardship, with particular emphasis on Australia’s new TV and computer recycling scheme.

The AWRE is taking place 21 and 22 November at the Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Darling Harbour.

The product stewardship panel discussion will take place on 22 November from 3:10 to 4:30 pm. Confirmed speakers include:

  • Steve Rust, Managing Director of Panasonic Australia Pty Ltd;
  • Peter Brisbane, Director, Television and Computer Regulator Team for the Australian Government’s Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities;
  • Carmel Dollisson, General Manager of Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited; and
  • Peter Bruce, Director – Service Parts Logistics, Australia for DHL Supply Chain.

The GlobalPSC will be facilitating the panel.

Steve will provide a large manufacturer’s perspective, including the importance of ensuring that the scheme works properly and the importance of being able to demonstrate responsible recycling of products. Carmel and Bruce will provide the perspective of approved arrangements responsible for delivering key outcomes of the scheme and the issues they face in doing so.

A facilitated panel discussion will follow short presentations by the expert panel members.  These key TV& computer scheme participants will provide the opportunity to answer questions such as:

The AWRE is the largest and most highly attended waste and recycling trade show in Australia. Now in its third year, the AWRE offers everyone in the industry an opportunity to showcase innovation, network with key waste & recycling decision makers from industry and government and attend high quality practical waste & recycling management seminars and workshops on key topics.

AWRE registration is free for all industry professionals.

How Could Local Governments Miss out on Product Stewardship?

Posted by GlobalPSC at 11:06 am, September 3rd, 2012Comments1

By Russ Martin, Global Product Stewardship Council President

Russ blogs regularly on product stewardship for the Business Environment Network (BEN). This blog originally appeared on BEN and has been reposted with permission of BEN publishers. 

Extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship have long had as a fundamental purpose the shifting of physical and financial responsibility for products away from local waste management and recycling programs back to producers and consumers.

Some of our colleagues in the U.S., the Product Stewardship Institute, have estimated the potential benefits to local programs of producer responsibility at over U.S. $2 billion. These benefits include actual costs, which would be the direct financial savings to a local government of implementing an EPR program and service benefits, which is the value of the added benefits a municipality would receive if EPR were to take hold. For example, many local governments in the U.S. dry and dispose of latex paint because it is a lower priority than other household hazardous waste products. If they had the money, they would collect it for recycling.

So if benefits are supposed to accrue mainly to local programs, how might local governments miss out on EPR and product stewardship? Simply by not understanding product stewardship, how it’s intended to work or how to make the most of it. Or, they could fail to engage effectively with other stakeholders.

First, some basics. Most consumers want products to be responsibly managed when they reach end-of-life. More product stewardship schemes across a broader range of items are likely.

Businesses will want to leverage existing resources, including local government collections and infrastructure, rather than start new programs completely from scratch. Local governments that engage industry can reduce their infrastructure and consumer education costs. Transparency and accountability of services provided will be an important issue.

Recent discussions with a variety of local government officials have shown that many still don’t seem to understand some of these basics. The idea is not to get grants from the government for collecting additional products. Nor to invite product stewardship organisations to tender for collection / recycling contracts of particular products.  Rather it’s about councils forming partnerships with product stewardship organisations to provide certain services. Strong standards will be necessary, and these will affect expectations and costs for all stakeholders. Collections should be free to consumers, and in some cases this may be regulated as in the new national TV and computer recycling scheme (NB: in Australia).

In addition, the targets for the TV and computer scheme will not necessarily match up to likely volumes of materials available for collection. The first annual recycling target is 30 per cent in 2012–13, increasing progressively each year to reach 80 per cent in 2021–22.

However, we can expect a great deal of collections initially, especially with the digital switchover and a backlog of end-of-life TVs and computers spread across Australia. Then the pendulum is likely to swing back the other way before eventually stabilising in say 5-6 years. As the targets start to really kick in, industry will then be scouring for TVs and computers in order to meet their targets. The characteristics of the products in and materials out of the scheme will vary significantly during this time, which will further complicate planning, implementation and basic commercial viability.

Liable parties under the scheme are paying co-regulatory arrangements to meet their target obligations in a cost-effective way. Once the arrangements meet their liable parties’ targets, recycling above and beyond that point simply represents a cost for which funding from liable parties cannot readily be sought. Yet the scheme’s first collections in the ACT exceeded the arrangement’s annual target for that region in one month.

Public interest and engagement cannot readily be turned on and off like a tap. Industry and local governments will need to collaborate with State and Commonwealth governments on how best to manage consumer expectations while delivering meaningful outcomes.

Consistency and reliability of service to customers is important. Yet, existing co-regulatory arrangements already diverge on whether they will cover the costs for collecting and processing TVs and computers beyond their target volumes. Councils will not be able to charge consumers for TV and computer recycling, then return those products through an approved arrangement.

This means that the cost for any excess collections beyond target volumes would need to be covered by councils, state or federal governments to maintain free collections to the consumer and avoid discouraging an engaged public. This is a transitional, yet very important, issue that will need to be managed carefully as we move towards fuller industry funding of programs.

So, if you’re a local government, how do you go about making the most of product stewardship?

First, know where you stand. What items have the greatest impacts (in terms of toxicity/hazard, volumes and public concern)? What are your costs for managing end-of-life products responsibly (including education, collections, recycling, disposal of residuals, externality costs, insurance and illegal dumping clean-up costs)?

Second, know where others stand and understand their needs. What programs are already in existence? What programs are planned or could potentially be implemented?

Third, actively engage with industries, state governments and other stakeholders. Seek agreement on program details and funding for issues such as collection types, frequency and accessibility for consumers; how best to promote returns and manage community expectations; how to address material quality/contamination; education; risks, roles and responsibilities; cost allocation (and neutrality?); auditing/verification and public reporting.

The local governments that understand these factors are in a much stronger position to truly benefit from product stewardship, especially if product stewardship expands to other items such as paints, pharmaceuticals and other e-waste beyond what we’re already seeing.

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Global Product Stewardship Council

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