Posts Tagged ‘environment’

GlobalPSC Member – Innes & Company LLC

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:36 pm, January 28th, 2015Comments2

Innes & Company LLC is a U.S.-based consultancy assisting clients around the globe in reaching their goals in the areas of product stewardship and sustainability.

Innes & Company President Melissa Walsh Innes is a former legislator with extensive experience in recycling and product stewardship legislation, including packaging, paint, medical sharps, pharmaceuticals, compact fluorescent lamps, electronics, and containers.

Melissa was the sponsor of Maine’s first-in-the-nation Product Stewardship Framework Law of 2010, as well as the sponsor of a successful electronic recycling program expansion in 2011 (both enacted with unanimous bipartisan support).

Melissa is the former deputy director for Recycling Reinvented, a U.S. national nonprofit working to advance recycling policies to increase national recycling rates for packaging and printed paper. Her experience at Recycling Reinvented incorporated best practices from recycling experts around the world, knowledge that Melissa uses to benefit the clients of Innes & Company.

In her time at Recycling Reinvented, Melissa further honed her skills in client engagement, stakeholder relations, media outreach, organization development, and policy crafting.

Melissa’s experience and approach to policy negotiation and stakeholder relations includes working side by side with a variety of stakeholders, from environmental organizations to chambers of commerce. Innes & Company helps clients achieve their policy goals using the same successful approach.

Contact details include:
400 East Elm Street
Yarmouth, Maine 04096  USA
207.847.3177 (office)
melissa@innesandcompany.com
Twitter: @InnesReport

Melissa also serves as a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

European Commission proposes mandatory CSR disclosure for large companies

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:24 pm, April 19th, 2013Comments1

by David Perchard, GlobalPSC Vice-President and Managing Director of Perchards Ltd

On 16 April the Commission adopted a proposal for a directive that will amend the Accounting Directives by requiring companies with more than 500 employees and either a balance sheet total of over EUR 20 million or a net turnover of over EUR 40 million, to include in their annual reports a non-financial statement containing information relating to environmental, social and employee matters, respect for human rights, anti-corruption and bribery matters.

This would have to include a description of company policy in these areas, the results of these policies, the risks related to them and how the company manages those risks. Where a company does not pursue policies in relation to one or more of these matters, it would have to provide an explanation for not doing so.

See here for further information.

Australian Environment Ministers Take Action on Batteries and Paint

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:57 pm, April 11th, 2013Comments15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environment Ministers from Australia have agreed on the need to include end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint in the Standing Council on Environment and Water’s (SCEW) work plan. In the communique announcing the decision, SCEW stated,

“More than 264 million handheld batteries reach the end of their useful life each year and the equivalent of 18,000 tonnes of paint require disposal each year. There could be significant environmental and community benefits to be gained from working with industry to find better management solutions for these products. Ministers asked officials to develop a work program and examine funding arrangements to progress these issues.”

The Global Product Stewardship Council and GlobalPSC members have been actively facilitating the development of product stewardship for both batteries and paint to help transition from government-funded takeback schemes to industry-led producer responsibility. In addition to running pilot projects, Government members Sustainability Victoria (SV) have been engaging industry players to develop practical approaches to product stewardship for the products.

Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) Chief Executive Dr Helen Lewis supported the SCEW decision, telling the GlobalPSC,

“This decision represents a significant milestone in ABRI’s campaign to promote the development of sustainable recovery programs for used batteries. We look forward to working with environment ministers and other stakeholders to explore options to increase recycling of handheld batteries. We need to ensure that everyone involved in the production or consumption of batteries – from the manufacturer or importer through to the consumer – plays their part in ensuring that batteries are used and recovered in a sustainable way.”

In conjunction with SV and ABRI, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, with an aim to developing a strategic plan to address domestic battery stewardship over the next three years. GlobalPSC Foundation members MS2 have also been incorporating GlobalPSC program expertise and data in developing the public policy and business case on handheld battery product stewardship for SV.

GlobalPSC member the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation (APMF) is collaborating with SV on an industry-led pilot program to collect trade waste data and to examine the most efficient and environmentally sound ways to collect and treat waste paint. The GlobalPSC is incorporating trial results in helping SV develop the public policy and business case for paint stewardship.

Richard Phillips, Executive Director of the APMF, also supported the decision by Environment Ministers and discussed plans for further research,

“The APMF supports the SCEW decision to include waste architectural and decorative paints in its work plan. A key element of our current Strategic Plan involves working with Governments on a future product stewardship scheme for waste architectural and decorative paint. When looking to the future, the APMF Council believes that a voluntary industry program has the potential to provide a cost effective and efficient product stewardship scheme for our sector. The current PaintCare trial program in Victoria also acknowledges that any future product stewardship program should also consider the issue of waste paint generated from the trade sector. Currently, there is no collection service in any state or territory for trade waste paint. The APMF also believes that further research is now warranted. Hence, we are funding a joint research project with Sustainability Victoria for Swinburne University of Technology to generate new research into better and more environmental friendly ways to address waste paint.”

John Polhill, Product Stewardship Specialist – Waste Strategy with SV, reinforced the importance of collaboration,

“The Victorian Government is committed to working with industry to effectively manage problematic products in accordance with Victorian and national waste policy. The work with ABRI and APMF demonstrates the success of industry-government partnerships thusfar.”

The GlobalPSC and several members have been appointed by the Australian Government to a Product Stewardship Advisory Group that provides independent advice to the government on products that could be considered for attention under the Product Stewardship Act. The SCEW work plan operates in conjunction with the Product Stewardship Advisory Group to explore opportunities for management of priority products.

 

Greening the Economy through Design Incentives

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:22 am, February 8th, 2013Comments0

A fundamental principle of extended producer responsibility (EPR) is that by making producers financially and/or physically responsible for the management of end-of-life (EOL) products, the producers internalise waste management considerations into their overall product strategies and seek ways to minimise their resulting costs.

In theory, EPR should result in design for environment (DfE) improvements such as product redesign and material substitution. Properly designed incentives should result in products that are, for example, easier to disassemble or recycle and that reduce or eliminate toxic materials that may pose risks to human health and the environment.

Does EPR actually result in DfE changes? Are such approaches cost effective? These are fundamental issues the Global Product Stewardship Council will be addressing in the coming year. First, it is important to understand how EPR approaches themselves can be designed to provide incentives for DfE.

Colleagues, some of whom work for GlobalPSC members or have been active in our discussions, address allocating EPR to produce DfE incentives in a December 2012 article for the European Energy and Environmental Law Review.

The authors discuss the ability of current EPR laws and policy tools to create appropriate design incentives through changes in responsibility for waste management, with an emphasis on Europe’s WEEE Directive for used electronics. Their research has implications for many EPR and product stewardship schemes.

Key questions posed include:

  • Should each producer be individually responsible for the waste of its own products, only, or is collective responsibility acceptable or even inevitable?
  • Should a producer be responsible for orphan products (whose producers are no longer on the market)?
  • Should the producer have both financial and operational responsibility?
  • Should producers be responsible for historical waste?

Accreditation of Voluntary Product Stewardship Programs

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:53 pm, February 28th, 2012Comments0

The Australian Government Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPaC) has released a consultation paper on the proposed model for accreditation of voluntary product stewardship arrangements under the Product Stewardship Act 2011. Written submissions on the consultation paper are sought by 27 March 2012.

Public meetings will be held in Sydney on 14 March 2012, Canberra on 16 March and Melbourne on 20 March. Further information on the consultation process is available on the SEWPaC website.

SEWPaC is a Government Member of the Global Product Stewardship Council, and the GlobalPSC is pleased to have provided input in the development of the proposed arrangements.

Subscribe
Receive news and updates from us

GlobalPSC Facebook
 
Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9449 9909
Fax: +61 2 9449 9901
Email: info@globalpsc.net