Posts Tagged ‘extended producer responsibility’

Guest Blog – Promoting the Business Case for Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:17 pm, December 7th, 2016Comments0

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The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and author of Product Stewardship in Action.

 

Product stewardship is often promoted as an environmental strategy for companies, or as an effective public policy solution to the costs of waste and recycling.

During my research and in-depth discussions with industry practitioners over the past few years, the broader benefits and value of product stewardship to business have become clear. Companies that understand the environmental and social impacts of their products; engage with stakeholders through genuine and open dialogue; and then implement appropriate strategies; can create shared value for themselves and their stakeholders. This applies whether the company is taking individual action or collaborating with industry peers.

Product stewardship in action: the business case for lifecycle thinking (Greenleaf UK) builds on my own experiences in eco-design, recycling and product stewardship. It would not have been possible, however, without the generosity of those I interviewed. Russ Martin, CEO of the GlobalPSC, supported this project from the beginning, provided useful information and insights, and connected me to local and international practitioners.

GlobalPSC members feature in some of the detailed case studies, including Call2Recycle (batteries and mobile phones), Vinyl Council of Australia (PVC packaging, medical products, flooring etc.), TechCollect (TVs and computers) and Close the Loop (printer cartridges). Other members, such as the Product Stewardship Institute, Product Stewardship Society, Dell, CalRecycle, Australian Packaging Covenant, Perchards Limited and PETCO, are also included as either mini-case studies or interviews.

My heartfelt thanks to all of the people who contributed their time, knowledge and insights to the project. GlobalPSC members can purchase the book at a 30% discount – please email Russ Martin for details.

 

GlobalPSC Member – Lorax Compliance

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:57 pm, November 18th, 2016Comments0

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Lorax Compliance is a leading provider of global product environmental compliance solutions comprising market-leading software, data provision services and practical down-to-earth regulatory advice and consulting.

Lorax Compliance delivers cloud-based Environmental Compliance Software and Services to companies who need to comply with local, national and global Extended Producer Responsibility waste directives concerning Packaging, WEEE and Batteries.

By offering turnkey compliance solutions, Lorax Compliance automates the regulatory systems and business processes of its customers, through the provision of the best software tools, the most robust data and regulatory know-how. Lorax Compliance’s mission is to assist customers to reduce their compliance risks and to manage the escalating costs of worldwide environmental compliance.

Contact details:

Website

Email: info@loraxcompliance.com

Twitter

LinkedIn 

 

2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:05 pm, November 13th, 2016Comments0

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2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing

Innovation Campus, Wollongong University, Australia


 

1 and 2 December 2016, 8.30am – 6.30pm

Registration is free and available here

The GlobalPSC is co-hosting Day 1 of the 2016 International Sustainability Symposium – Green Manufacturing event in conjunction with the UNSW Centre for Sustainable Materials Research & Technology (SMaRT@UNSW).

Day 1 Overview

This interactive event will delve into the interactions between increasingly complex products desired by consumers and product stewardship, including recycling, that is increasingly expected of producers.

Environmentally-friendly technologies and products, like solar panels, organic cotton garments, bamboo flooring or additive-free foods are important. But even greater environmental and economic benefits can be generated by ‘greening’ the industrial processes that deliver the materials, components and products our mass, global markets demand. This session focuses on the many new opportunities to leverage high temperature reactions to transform even complex waste streams in the production of a new generation of ‘green materials’. By redirecting waste, as a valuable resource, back into our industrial processes we can transform it in the production of previously unimaginable value-added materials and products; that is, truly green materials.

Extended producer responsibility (EPR) was originally intended to reduce environmental impacts of products (primarily through redesign) by shifting physical and/or financial responsibility of post-consumer products to producers. EPR almost always has a regulatory underpinning, while the related concept of product stewardship may be voluntary or regulatory. Although product stewardship addresses full life-cycle impacts of products and their use by consumers, product stewardship and EPR programs have traditionally focused on recycling and material recovery.

Efforts to reduce environmental impacts across supply and recovery chains can be affected by the very processes used in green manufacturing. For example, green manufacturing can result in products without existing markets for recovered materials and are therefore not effectively captured by ‘traditional’ models of product stewardship and EPR. Producers are also increasingly being held accountable for responsibly managing products that do not have significant redesign, reuse or recycling options, such as household-generated ‘sharps’ and unwanted medicines.

Day 1 will explore these complex interactions and trade-offs with notable speakers and feature audience interaction to create a framework for how policies and practices are prioritised in order to produce optimal social, economic and environmental benefits.

 

GlobalPSC Member Profile – Valoryza

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:53 am, June 29th, 2016Comments2

 

 

Based in Santiago, Chile, Valoryza Environmental Advisors offer strategic advice and expertise to cost-effectively support compliance with extended producer responsibility (EPR), by way of product stewardship programs to producers and organizations that are affected by environmental regulations.

As a regional expert with access to a global best practice network, Valoryza assists local and foreign companies in navigating through and succeeding within Latin American waste management regulatory systems and frameworks.

Key services include, but not are limited to, those listed below.

Offering representation and consultancy services to:

  • Chilean industries seeking to participate in the elaboration and detailed design of the EPR systems.
  • International companies with obligations under the EPR and other environmental regulations.

Strategic advice:

  • Design, implementation and administration of waste management systems under EPR regulations.
  • Cost-effective management of product impacts, in line with product stewardship requirements.
  • Elaboration of Strategic Plans to help guide companies as they face new challenges related to new and more demanding environmental regulations.

Solution design, implementation and management for:

  • Source separation, collection, packaging, processing and re-use of all types of waste.
  • Waste management aimed at recovery services to ensure the fulfillment of business sustainability goals and environmental commitments with both local and national authorities.

Valoryza consultants have extensive experience in conducting investigation, research studies, audits, assessments and developing strategic forecasts to support clients in meeting their obligations regarding manufacturing, waste management, sorting, transport and final disposal in the most responsible and cost-effective way.

If you represent a business with opportunities related to EPR, waste management or other environmental matters in Latin America, Valoryza is available to help.

Contact:

Rodrigo Leiva Neumann
General Manager
+56 9 72143053

Rodrigo.leiva@valoryza.com

 

Free Webinar – Exploring the Circular Economy and how EPR Fits In

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:36 pm, June 13th, 2016Comments0

 

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GPSC_LOGO_RGBThe Product Stewardship Institute and Global Product Stewardship Council are offering a free webinar on the Circular Economy and possible roles for extended producer responsibility (EPR).

 Export to Your Calendar 6/14/2016
When: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
10:30am – 12:00pm EST
Where: Massachusetts
United States
Contact: Suzy Whalen
suzy@productstewardship.us
6172368293

 

Online registration is available until: 14 June 2016 EST

« Go to Upcoming Event List
Exploring the Circular Economy and How EPR Fits inTuesday, June 14, 2016 (10:30 am -12:00 pm EST)

In December 2015, the European Commission announced its new Circular Economy Package, a plan to “end our reliance on the rubbish heap and turn waste into a resource.” By incorporating eco-design, waste prevention, and reuse and recycling into business strategy, the European Commission hopes to save money, create jobs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions throughout the continent. This PSI webinar will explore how the concept of the “circular economy” emerged, how it is different from concepts we’re all familiar with – cradle to cradle, recycling, and zero waste – and why EPR schemes play such an important role in accomplishing the European Commission’s goals. Those working closely to implement the Circular Economy Package will provide a status update and lay out next steps. Speakers will also offer concrete examples of the circular economy at work, including a deep dive into packaging EPR programs throughout Europe. Lastly, we will explore how we can translate these concepts, case studies, and plans to the U.S., joining Europe in their goal of simultaneously improving the environment and the economy.

 

Sponsored by:

  

Speakers:


Joachim Quoden

Managing Director, Extended Producer Responsibility Alliance (EXPRA)

Joachim Quoden studied law at the “Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität” in Bonn between 1987 and 1992 and served his legal internship in Bonn and Cologne from 1993 until 1995.In January 2001 he also became Secretary General of PRO EUROPE, the umbrella organisation of 35 packaging recovery organisations using the Green Dot trademark. Between April 2005 and February 2013, he was appointed as managing director of this organisation. Since April 2013 he is appointed as managing director of EXPRA – Extended Producer Responsibility Alliance – Inspiring Packaging Recycling, a new alliance of currently 23 non-profit packaging recovery organisations owned by obliged industry from 21 countries from Europe, Canada and Israel. Besides this, he has been working since June 1995 as independent German Lawyer specialized on international extended producer responsibility legislation.

 


Sascha Schuh

Managing Director, ASCON Resource Management Holding

Sascha Schuh is Managing Director of the ASCON Resource Management Holding GmbH. He studied Business Administration at the Universities of Cologne and Passau.After graduating in 1991, he became Executive Assistant at Der Grüne Punkt – Duales System Deutschland GmbH and acted as Head of the General Administration from 1992 to 1995. In 1995 Sascha Schuh became Head of Quality Management Sorting and Manager with full signing powers to the subsidiary of DSD GmbH, the German Society for Plastic Recycling DKR. He founded the ASCON Company for Waste and Secondary Raw Materials Consulting in 2000, and in 2008 the ELS European Lizenzierungs Systeme.

 

  

Sirpa Pietikäinen

Member, European Parliament

Sirpa Pietikäinen is a Finnish politician from the National Coalition Party and Member of the European Parliament in the EPP Group since 2008. She is a member of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) and the Delegation for relations with China, and is substitute member in the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI), the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (FEMM) and the Special Committee on Tax Rulings and Other Measures Similar in Nature or Effect (TAXE). In 2015, she was the European Parliament’s Rapporteur on Resource efficiency: moving towards a circular economy, and is currently very active in the legislative process linked to the EU’s new Circular Economy Package.Prior to the European Parliament, she was a Finnish Minister of Environment (1991-1995) and had an extensive career in the Finnish parliament where she worked from 1983 to 2003.

 

 

Marianne Muller

Policy Officer, Packaging Waste Directive, European Commission

Marianne Muller started her career at the European Commission in 1993 in the public procurement department of the Internal Marked Directorate General and became, among other things, responsible for questions relating to environmental considerations in public procurement. After finalising the 2001 Commission interpretative communication on the possibilities for integrating environmental considerations into public procurement, she moved to the Environment Directorate General in 2002.In the Environment Directorate General, Ms Muller became first responsible for issues relating to the Aarhus Convention and public access to environmental information, then for the European Environmental management and Audit System (EMAS) Regulation, and subsequently worked in the legal department of the Directorate General. As of March 2013, she is responsible for the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive.

 

 

Scott Cassel (Moderator)

Chief Executive Officer, Product Stewardship Institute

Scott Cassel has over 30 years of experience tackling waste management issues in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Prior to founding the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) in 2000, he served seven years as the Director of Waste Policy and Planning for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, where he developed and implemented solid and hazardous waste management policies and programs. Scott is a nationally renowned leader in the product stewardship movement and has experience across multiple product categories, including electronics, lamps, thermostats, pharmaceuticals, mattresses, packaging, and paint. As PSI’s CEO, he developed the widely acclaimed facilitation process that the organization uses for stakeholder engagement and consensus-building—a process that resulted in the nation’s first industry-run, government-mandated paint stewardship program.

 

Guest Blog – Addressing the Challenges of Measuring Recycling Performance

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:45 pm, June 8th, 2016Comments1

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Carl Smith, President and CEO of Call2Recycle, Inc.

Prior to becoming the head of a non-profit 12 years ago, I had spent most of my career with big for-profit companies where we measured everything. These measures provided continuous feedback on what was working and what needed to be fixed (or stopped). Upon arriving in the non-profit, product stewardship world, I noted that much less was measured and that organizational performance metrics were at best elusive.

One of the biggest frustrations we have is how to accurately assess the performance of our battery recycling efforts. The recycling field has typically relied on “diversion rates” as a measure; specific to battery collection and recycling, the more specific “collection rate” measure is typically used. As has been defined by the EU, battery collection rate is defined by the amount recycled in a year divided by the average annual sales of batteries for the previous three years. Like “diversion rates”, a “collection rate” is expressed as a percentage.

Traditionally, the focus of the Call2Recycle® program in the US has been on collecting and recycling rechargeable batteries. For a variety of reasons, this ‘typical’ approach to measuring our performance simply didn’t make sense.

First, fairly soon after I took this position, it became clear that rechargeable battery companies simply do not know what their consumer battery sales are into any specific jurisdiction. There are simply too many channels, applications and value chains to even estimate sales. For a very simple example, let’s look at how a big retailer like Walmart operates in the US. It purchases in vast quantities directly from a manufacturing facility in Asia. The facility transports via container ship to a West Coast port where they are then trucked to a distribution facility in a Midwestern state. Given the North American Fair Trade Agreement (NAFTA), units could also be shipped to distribution centers in Canada and Mexico. Those distributions centers then fulfill store orders on a ‘just in time’ basis. So if you asked the manufacturer how many batteries it has sold in, for instance, the state of Vermont, it won’t know. It sold to Walmart and where they actually appeared in the US market is a mystery to them.

Second, the rechargeable batteries we’re collecting today are likely 5, 10 or even 20 years old. On average, they were certainly not sold during the three-year window that a typical collection rate calculation would measure. A related issue to this is the general inclination that consumers “hoard” electronics and batteries long after their useful life. How many old cellphones do you have sitting in a drawer? When is the last time you used your first power tool?

These issues are particularly difficult for rechargeable batteries which generally last longer than primary batteries, are hoarded more (with the products they power) and are sold through much more complex value chains. So the conventional approach to assessing our performance using a collection rate just didn’t work.

We commissioned a study to see if we could develop a methodology that was repeatable, credible and defensible that would provide us more insight into this issue. When we started the study, we focused on two stages:,

  1. develop a way of accurately measuring battery sales; and
  2. adjust sales for the lifespan of the batteries.

The more we immersed ourselves into this subject, a third issue emerged that was in the initial research requirements.

Increasingly, rechargeable batteries are designed so that they cannot be easily removed by the consumer, which generally means that they are not typically available to be recycled. Cellphones, tablets and laptops are the most obvious examples of this. But how about electric toothbrushes and cordless shavers? Even when the host product is recycled by, let’s say, an electronics recycler, the batteries are not typically the material most coveted in the process. Therefore, even if they are technically recycled with the host product, the process has not often been optimized to reclaim the precious material in the battery.

We maintain that embedded batteries are not generally available for collection by a battery stewardship program and should be excluded from the calculation of “collection rate”. So we added a third stage of this research: adjust sales downward by the amount of embedded batteries in order to determine an accurate assessment of the amount of batteries truly available for collection.

The outcome of this research – the paper available via this link– shows our results. It gives us a new denominator called “available for collection” that would replace the EU standards of the average of the last three years’ sales. In the end, we now say:

Collection Rate = Batteries Collected / Sales (Lifespan) – Embedded Batteries

In addition to the important data generated through this research, we came away with four important observations consistent with the conversation above:

  • For primary batteries, battery sales from “bricks and mortar” retail locations are less and less of the total market. There are many more diverse channels for batteries to enter the marketplace including, in particular, on-line markets.
  • A new method for measuring collection rates is needed for rechargeable batteries to measure collection performance. Such a method must meaningfully capture longer battery and product lifecycles and increases in embedded batteries.
  • While some but not all of the products that rechargeable batteries power are managed through other stewardship programs, they are generally getting “lost” in tracking performance.
  • It is imperative that collection programs incorporate long product lifecycles into their funding models, as batteries remain in market long after they are sold.

The last point is notable. Most battery stewardship programs charge stewards based on sales into the market. However, there may be a 20-year lag time between when steward fees are paid on a sale and when we incur the cost to collect and recycle the battery from that sale. This puts a strain on funding models that are often forced to minimize reserves that might take care of the long-term “tail” associated with rechargeable batteries.

In the end, we felt we “moved the needle” on creating a better way to measure performance. We also added to the conversation on the issues associated with battery collection and recycling. But we don’t believe we’ve totally solved the challenges, hopefully giving others the opportunity to contribute to this discussion.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council.  

Carl E. Smith is President and CEO of Call2Recycle, Inc., North America’s leading product stewardship organization. With more than 35 years’ experience in environmental issues, program development, advocacy, corporate communications and technology, Carl is a nationally and internationally recognized spokesperson and leader in the corporate responsibility, sustainability and product stewardship arena. Carl leads the Atlanta-based non-for-profit organization in its efforts to help preserve the environment through responsible recycling of batteries among other products. Carl is also a GlobalPSC Executive Committee member and our Treasurer.

 

GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate Member – The Compliance Map Ltd

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:22 pm, March 11th, 2016Comments1

 

Compliance Map develops solutions to help businesses manage their environmental compliance obligations arising from regulations and directives and to help optimize their use of resources. This includes product stewardship responsibilities, reporting and minimization of waste as well as carbon disclosure that will play a significant part in identifying, monitoring and driving down their customer’s global environmental impacts.

Both Product Stewardship and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) regulations and standards are at the core of Compliance Map’s solution offering. This includes mechanisms to collect, store and produce remittance reports required for submission to EPR schemes for directives such as WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment), Battery as well as deposit and worldwide Packaging programmes. The solution offered automatically manages sales warehousing data and combines with relevant Packaging, WEEE, Battery, Oil, Beverage or Paint information to produce costs and weight reports ready to be remitted to registered schemes on a monthly, quarterly or annually basis. This enables companies to automate the entire process by which they track and report waste to schemes and programmes worldwide and make better use of their own resources.

Compliance Map are made of a team of regulatory compliance experts with over 20+ years of experience in the arena of environmental compliance which has been fed into their software solution offerings, creating a holistic approach to managing obligations businesses face in today’s regulatory climate.

 

GlobalPSC Expands Board for Greater Program and North American Coverage

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:22 pm, December 18th, 2015Comments2

The GlobalPSC Executive Committee (Board) recently expanded its coverage to include more members with practical program experience in implementing North American product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) approaches in addition to further deepening its policy expertise. These additions were reaffirmed and complemented by the Board and GlobalPSC members during our recent Annual General Meeting (AGM). These changes will further the GlobalPSC vision of facilitating the development and implementation of effective product stewardship schemes globally.

Recently, the Board expanded its coverage to include David Lawes (BC Used Oil Management Association), Kylie Hughes (Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection) and Mark Kurschner (Product Care Association). During the AGM, Carl Smith (Call2Recycle) was also appointed to the Board. All Board appointments, including long-serving members Scott CasselGarth Hickle and Ed Cordner were affirmed during the AGM and are valid for one year.

The GlobalPSC Board recognises the invaluable contributions of Neil Hastie during his years of service on the Board and as President. Neil has elected to step back from his GlobalPSC duties to focus on other pursuits. Neil has our continued appreciation and support.

During the AGM, the following Board members were elected as office-holders for one-year terms:

The President’s Report and Financial Report from the AGM are available to members.

 

GlobalPSC Members Support Product Stewardship in California

Posted by Brett Giddings at 8:01 pm, November 24th, 2015Comments1

 

San Francisco

On November 4th GlobalPSC members CalRecycle, Call2Recycle and PaintCare joined the California Product Stewardship Council and a range of government and industry representatives to provide perspectives on the role of legislation in driving product stewardship for household hazardous waste (HHW).

In a hearing held by the California Assembly Select Committee on Waste Reduction & Recycling in 21st Century California, participants expressed support for well-considered extended producer responsibility (EPR) to be trialled and ultimately introduced in the state for HHW; including batteries, used pharmaceuticals and sharps. The ubiquity of many HHW products and the potential threats they pose to the environment and human health were highlighted at the hearing, with estimates of approximately 600 million pounds being landfilled in the state each year.

With a ‘patchwork’ of ordinances being introduced in counties throughout the state, many agreed that state-wide EPR programs, underpinned by appropriate legislative frameworks, and managed by relevant industry bodies, would provide a more effective and efficient solution.

The hearing can viewed in full via this video posted by the California Product Stewardship Council.

 

CleanFARMS Expands Programming to Seed and Pesticide Bags

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:26 am, October 28th, 2015Comments1

Canada’s leading agricultural stewardship organization, CleanFARMS, is expanding its stewardship programming. Starting in 2016, Eastern Canadian farmers will have access to a seed and pesticide bag collection program that will help keep these bags out of municipal landfills.

This program draws its roots in the Maritimes where farmers, ag-retailers and stewards have been working together to collect and safely dispose of empty pesticide bags since 2006. The program then moved west to Ontario and Quebec where it was offered on a pilot basis in select regions from 2012 – 2015.

The program will collect both small pesticide and seed bags (typically under 30 kilograms) and bigger bulk bags. The small bags are generally made of multi-walled paper though some manufacturers are using other materials such as plastic and plastic laminates. Most bulk bags (mainly 500 kg and 1000 kg) bags are made of woven poly-propylene plastic.

Empty bags will be accepted back at the point of purchase which gives farmers easily accessible collection points. They are then disposed of through waste to energy incineration facilities. As the program grows, CleanFARMS hopes to move higher up on the 3Rs hierarchy by recycling of the bags. The key to recycling some of these bags will be to ensure a consistent and adequate supply of the bags.

CleanFARMS and its predecessor CropLife Canada, on behalf of the agricultural industry, have been operating extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs for over 25 years. This new program shows that the agricultural industry embraces EPR and incorporates the practice as normal business practice.

In 2014, 197,000 bags were collected through the program. This is in addition to the 4.5 million containers that came through CleanFARMS’ award-winning empty pesticide and fertilizer container recycling program. To round off 2014, 224,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and 5,000 kilograms of obsolete livestock medication were collected and safely destroyed.

CleanFARMS now joins agricultural stewardship organizations around the world offering EPR programs on a voluntary basis with results rivalling most regulated programs.

Visit here for more information.

Photo supplied by CleanFARMS.

 

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Email: info@globalpsc.net