Posts Tagged ‘industry’

Guest Blog – Dutch Sustainability Plans for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:24 pm, August 13th, 2015Comments2

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Gill Bevington, Policy Analyst, Packaging for Perchards.

 

 

The packaging sustainability institute, KIDV, KIDV has published an overview in English about the progress of the sustainability plans which industry undertook to develop as part of its commitments in the Framework Agreement on Packaging.

KIDV reports that sectoral sustainability plans covering 80% of the weight of packaging on the market have now been submitted. This first set of plans sets out objectives and measures to achieve them by 2018 and further plans will be developed with objectives for 2022.

Since the Framework Agreement was signed, the Packaging Decree has been revised. The revised Decree, which was adopted in 2014, gives the Minister powers to impose statutory sustainability requirements on packaging. These new powers are seen as fall back powers if the plans now being developed do not deliver the results the Dutch authorities are hoping for. It is important therefore that Dutch industry supports and implements the plans.

KIDV’s methodology for the plans is to identify the front runners in each sector, and then aim to bring all companies in that sector up to the same level. Targets for the sector are based on the best in class. The plans were assessed by an independent review committee established by KIDV and consisting of four experts from different universities.

As KIDV’s approach was innovative, it was challenging to get the sectors involved in the development of the plans. Some showed reluctance at first, comments KIDV, but because the approach was unfamiliar, not through lack of interest. KIDV warns that the process will take time, depending on the level of investment needed to implement the plans and because the scientific knowledge needed to set targets was not available in all cases.

Each sectoral plan sets out the measures to be taken by producers in order to increase the sustainability of product-pack combinations within their sector, both measures to be taken by 2018 and then by 2022. Each sector is responsible for implementing its plan. The focus is currently on the product-pack combinations with the greatest potential environmental benefit.

The first plans to be developed cover the fruit and vegetables, food (including animal feed) and e-commerce sectors. A sub-plan for rPET 2018-2022 has been submitted by the Dutch association for soft drinks, waters and juices.

The main focus of the first plans to be submitted is:

  • greater use of sustainably managed and certified raw materials, such as FSC;
  • increase in the proportion of secondary raw materials in packaging, such as in plastic bottles and pots, tubs and trays (PTT)s;
  • decrease in the quantity of materials used, through optimisation and source reduction;
  • increasing the recyclability of packaging, through the use of mono-materials;
  • use of recycling logos on packaging to enable consumers to sort their packaging better.

There is nothing new about policy-makers encouraging producers to improve the environmental performance of their packaging. Industry bodies throughout Europe have for years published good practice examples of optimised packaging, including source reduction, improved recyclability etc, which aim both to encourage other producers and to demonstrate to policy-makers the efforts being made.

It has always been up to each producer to decide whether and how to optimise its packaging. Even in countries like Belgium and Spain, where producers have to submit prevention plans to the authorities, the producers set their own targets in their plans. But the new Dutch approach is different – it seeks to identify which are the best product-pack combinations in a sector under different headings and then to bring all producers in that sector up to that standard. With the threat of legislation if the plans do not yield as much as expected, sectoral trade associations will be working hard to encourage their members to participate in the process.

But it raises some questions:

  • What happens if the front runner is in that enviable position because of a unique set of circumstances which other producers in the sector cannot emulate?
  • How much pressure will individual companies be under to improve their sustainability in order to meet the targets in the plan? There may be sound reasons why a producer cannot match the best in class. Plans are being implemented by the sectors so individual companies will be judged by their peers (competitors) who will understand the constraints. But if it looks as though the objectives in a plan will not be met, which could have implications for all producers in the sector, what then?
  • What about imported products, for which the importer will have to persuade its foreign suppliers to make the necessary changes? That might not be possible or desirable because of the longer transport distances and/or because the preferred packaging type is not available in the country of production. Individual Dutch importers are of course free to set their own product/packaging specifications, but if those specifications are set out in a formal plan, could they represent a barrier to trade to suppliers in other EU member states?
  • Could there be problems with commercial confidentiality? Some front runners may be happy to be named and to provide information about their packaging. But others may prefer to keep the data confidential because their optimised packaging helps to give them their competitive edge. And will the laggards be named and shamed, even if there are sound reasons why they cannot match the best in class?

What happens if the results in 2018 are not as good as expected, even if the sectors have worked hard to improve the sustainability of their packaging? How will Dutch policy-makers respond? Will they acknowledge that the achievements are as good as they possibly can be and that, using the methodology, performance will continue to improve in future? Or will they conclude that this “voluntary” action is insufficient and that legislation is necessary? It remains to be seen whether this new Dutch approach is just rhetoric or whether it will deliver real improvements.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

Gill Bevington joined Perchards in 1991 and currently serves as Policy Analyst, Packaging. She monitors, analyses and reports on European legislative developments on packaging (and industry response to them) at national and EU level, and is an expert on national packaging waste management initiatives across Europe. Gill has carried out many tailor-made studies for clients on aspects of the packaging legislation in place in various European countries and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject. 

 

South Africa Requires Industry Waste Management Plans

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:20 pm, July 31st, 2015Comments1

iStock_000004145826_Large_South_Africa_Flag

South Africa has issued requirements for the paper and packaging industry, electrical and electronic equipment industry and lighting industry to prepare and submit industry waste management plans for approval by the Minister of Environmental Affairs under the National Environmental Management Act 2008.

Details on requirements, consultation process, timeframes and penalties for non-compliance are available to GlobalPSC members in the Knowledge Base under the Frameworks & Harmonization tab.

 

First Year Outcomes for Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:59 am, March 31st, 2014Comments1

Australia has released a report on the first year outcomes of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS or Scheme).

Reports have also been made publicly available for the three approved co-regulatory arrangements that were operational in 2012–13: DHL Supply Chain (Australia) Pty Limited, the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) and E-Cycle Solutions Pty Ltd. Two of the three approved co-regulatory arrangements, DHL Supply Chain and TechCollect/ANZRP, are GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate members.

According to the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment, a Government member of the GlobalPSC:

“A total of 635 collection services, including drop off points at major electronics retailers and local government and other waste facilities, as well as temporary collection events, were provided by the three co-regulatory arrangements between the commencement of the Scheme and the end of June 2013.

“An estimated total of 137,756 tonnes of televisions and computers reached end of life in Australia in 2012–13. Industry’s target under the scheme was to recycle 30 per cent of this amount, or 41,327 tonnes. A total of 40,813 tonnes of recycling was achieved, equivalent to 98.8 per cent of the scheme target and almost double the estimated level of recycling prior to the scheme’s introduction. DHL Supply Chain and E-Cycle Solutions exceeded their recycling targets, while ANZRP fell short of its recycling target. E-waste not covered by the scheme target remained the responsibility of state, territory and local governments. National data is not available on the amount of e-waste recycling that occurred outside the scheme in 2012–13.”

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:23 am, February 20th, 2014Comments4

Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance Inc. (CSSA) is a national, non-profit steward-founded and -owned organization. CSSA represents the recycling interests of Canadian businesses, while working on their behalf to create convenient and environmentally sustainable ways for consumers to dispose of the packaging and printed paper business creates.

For businesses that participate in recycling programs across Canada, CSSA makes it easy and seamless for them to meet their stewardship obligations by providing a harmonized approach to stewardship under a single administrative umbrella. CSSA offers a one-stop-shop for packaging and printed paper stewards to fulfill all of their stewardship obligations, doing away with costly replication province-by-province.

The programs CSSA provides management services for are either fully or partially funded by industry and includes packaging and printed paper recycling programs in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario, and also includes Ontario’s Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program.

On behalf of its stewards, and in the interest of consumers, CSSA is working to advance more comprehensive recycling systems that meet the needs and desires of consumers to recycle more and stay at the top of their recycling game.

For more information visit here.

 

Australian Packaging Covenant 2013 Annual Report

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:33 pm, January 22nd, 2014Comments0

The Australian Packaging Covenant‘s 2013 annual report highlights continued improvement from previous years’ efforts. The Covenant is a co-regulatory* product stewardship scheme based on a collaborative approach between industry, government and community groups to increase recycling and reduce litter.

2013 highlights include:

  • Another increase in the packaging recycling rate, from 39% in 2003 to 64.2% in 2013.

 

  • Continued reduction in litter based on the National Litter Index.
  • A record number of 925 signatories, with a 95% compliance rate.
  • Improvement across all key performance indicators reported by Covenant signatories.
  • A$55.4M in funding for 75 new recycling and litter related projects under the current term of the Covenant.

* co-regulatory = voluntary approach with a regulatory underpinning to address free riders

GlobalPSC Member – Waste Recycling Industry Association of Queensland

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:38 pm, August 29th, 2013Comments2

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Waste Recycling Industry Association of Queensland (WRIQ) is Queensland’s leading waste and recycling association. As an Australian not-for-profit industry-sponsored association, it has over 90 members, ranging from small independent operators through to the large national and multi-national organisations.

WRIQ provides its members with confidence and professionalism that their business interests will be advocated clearly and concisely to all stakeholders to ensure the industry remains a dynamic, sustainable and significant sector in relation to the provision of waste and recycling services. This includes industry and regulator working groups to advocate clear policy direction to increase resource recovery and the promotion of sound principles such as product stewardship.

WRIQ produces voluntary Codes and Guidelines which promote sound industry practices and build confidence in the professionalism and identity of the sector. WRIQ and its stakeholders acknowledge industry achievements and showcase its member’s services of delivering highly ethical and compliant industry practices through the WRIQ Annual Member Awards Program, which recognises outstanding achievements by members, their employees and potential new entrants (students) into the industry.

Focused on improving job skills, training opportunities and the level of professionalism for all industry employees, WRIQ offers monthly member forums and has a Next Generation Group.

For more information on WRIQ please contact its Chief Executive Officer, Mr Rick Ralph on +61 7 3375 6961. Please visit the WRIQ website for the latest industry reports and information on the current working groups.

Global Packaging Stewardship Overview

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:30 pm, August 15th, 2013Comments0

 

 

 

In August 2013, GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin provided an overview of global packaging product stewardship and extended producer responsibility initiatives to the Australian Packaging Covenant Council. The report is now available on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

International developments in product stewardship and EPR for packaging and other products were examined to help provide context for discussions on their implications for packaging in Australia. Topics such as industry leadership, material ownership, increased application of EPR across a broader range of products, a focus on better understanding impacts on local government costs and resource savings and attempts to harmonise varying schemes to reduce costs were addressed, as well as their implications for packaging. Several key developments in packaging product stewardship in North America were discussed in detail, including British Columbia’s EPR for packaging and printed paper (PPP), industry-led efforts to address PPP EPR comprehensively in the US and the increased influence of litter and marine debris as drivers for packaging product stewardship programs. Relevant aspects of developments in Europe and elsewhere were also highlighted. Australian implications of these issues were then discussed, with an emphasis on policies and projects.

Australia Seeks Feedback on Amendments to National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:09 pm, April 17th, 2013Comments1

The Australian Government today released a discussion paper which proposes amendments to the regulations governing the administration of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.

Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP said the public consultation period offers an opportunity for interested parties to help build on the early success of the scheme.

“The discussion paper is based on the experiences gained during the scheme’s first year of operation and on feedback from the television and computer industry organisations running the scheme,” Ms Rishworth said.

“Given its ground-breaking nature, we commenced the scheme anticipating that operational experiences would identify further opportunities to fine-tune and enhance the scheme as it matured. After twelve months the signs are that the scheme is progressing well, and by monitoring the roll-out closely we’ve been able to identify some enhancements to strengthen it further.”

Through its own analysis, together with broad stakeholder feedback, the government has identified four key areas where the scheme could be further enhanced.

These are:

  • better matching of product codes and conversion factors (as assisted by MS2)
  • strengthening the capacity of co-regulatory arrangements (including DHL Supply Chain) to manage risk
  • simplifying administrative processes for e-waste collection and recycling
  • aligning the scheme’s activities more closely with the waste stream and the community’s requirements for recycling.

To address these areas, the government is proposing amendments to the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations 2011, with effect from 1 July 2013.

Ms Rishworth said the government is pleased with the roll out and the initial success of the scheme.

“Since commencing on-ground activity in May 2012, thousands of tonnes of unwanted televisions and computers have already been recycled and over two hundred collection services have been established across Australia.”

“The scheme is achieving what it was set up to do—reduce the amount of e-waste going to landfill by providing householders and small business with free access to recycling services across the country—and these amendments will ensure its continued success.”

As part of a possible second phase of amendments to take place after 30 June 2014, the consultation is also seeking views on whether there is benefit in extending the scope of the scheme to cover similar electronic products, such as home entertainment equipment including video cassette recorders, DVD players, set top boxes, video game consoles and stereo equipment; refining the calculation of the total ‘waste arising’ and further refining product codes and conversion factors.

The discussion paper is available here.

Submissions are due by 7 May and can be submitted to ewaste@environment.gov.au.

Stakeholder forums will be held during April and May 2013 to discuss the proposed amendments. Dates and venues for the stakeholder forums will be available on the department’s website at www.environment.gov.au/ewaste.

The National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is industry funded and run, but regulated by the Australian Government under the landmark Product Stewardship Act 2011.

Information from media release by The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP dated 17 April 2013 titled Amendments to National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme released for public comment.

Australian Environment Ministers Take Action on Batteries and Paint

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:57 pm, April 11th, 2013Comments15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environment Ministers from Australia have agreed on the need to include end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint in the Standing Council on Environment and Water’s (SCEW) work plan. In the communique announcing the decision, SCEW stated,

“More than 264 million handheld batteries reach the end of their useful life each year and the equivalent of 18,000 tonnes of paint require disposal each year. There could be significant environmental and community benefits to be gained from working with industry to find better management solutions for these products. Ministers asked officials to develop a work program and examine funding arrangements to progress these issues.”

The Global Product Stewardship Council and GlobalPSC members have been actively facilitating the development of product stewardship for both batteries and paint to help transition from government-funded takeback schemes to industry-led producer responsibility. In addition to running pilot projects, Government members Sustainability Victoria (SV) have been engaging industry players to develop practical approaches to product stewardship for the products.

Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) Chief Executive Dr Helen Lewis supported the SCEW decision, telling the GlobalPSC,

“This decision represents a significant milestone in ABRI’s campaign to promote the development of sustainable recovery programs for used batteries. We look forward to working with environment ministers and other stakeholders to explore options to increase recycling of handheld batteries. We need to ensure that everyone involved in the production or consumption of batteries – from the manufacturer or importer through to the consumer – plays their part in ensuring that batteries are used and recovered in a sustainable way.”

In conjunction with SV and ABRI, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, with an aim to developing a strategic plan to address domestic battery stewardship over the next three years. GlobalPSC Foundation members MS2 have also been incorporating GlobalPSC program expertise and data in developing the public policy and business case on handheld battery product stewardship for SV.

GlobalPSC member the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation (APMF) is collaborating with SV on an industry-led pilot program to collect trade waste data and to examine the most efficient and environmentally sound ways to collect and treat waste paint. The GlobalPSC is incorporating trial results in helping SV develop the public policy and business case for paint stewardship.

Richard Phillips, Executive Director of the APMF, also supported the decision by Environment Ministers and discussed plans for further research,

“The APMF supports the SCEW decision to include waste architectural and decorative paints in its work plan. A key element of our current Strategic Plan involves working with Governments on a future product stewardship scheme for waste architectural and decorative paint. When looking to the future, the APMF Council believes that a voluntary industry program has the potential to provide a cost effective and efficient product stewardship scheme for our sector. The current PaintCare trial program in Victoria also acknowledges that any future product stewardship program should also consider the issue of waste paint generated from the trade sector. Currently, there is no collection service in any state or territory for trade waste paint. The APMF also believes that further research is now warranted. Hence, we are funding a joint research project with Sustainability Victoria for Swinburne University of Technology to generate new research into better and more environmental friendly ways to address waste paint.”

John Polhill, Product Stewardship Specialist – Waste Strategy with SV, reinforced the importance of collaboration,

“The Victorian Government is committed to working with industry to effectively manage problematic products in accordance with Victorian and national waste policy. The work with ABRI and APMF demonstrates the success of industry-government partnerships thusfar.”

The GlobalPSC and several members have been appointed by the Australian Government to a Product Stewardship Advisory Group that provides independent advice to the government on products that could be considered for attention under the Product Stewardship Act. The SCEW work plan operates in conjunction with the Product Stewardship Advisory Group to explore opportunities for management of priority products.

 

11 European Producer Responsibility Organizations Release Manifesto on EPR Principles for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC at 11:27 am, January 19th, 2013Comments0

Packaging producer responsibility organizations (PROs) from eleven European countries have issued a joint manifesto for achieving successful extended producer responsibility (EPR) for packaging.

The manifesto and associated media release were published on 18 January, 2013.

 

The eleven organizations represented are: CONAI (Italy), EcoEmbes (Spain), Ecopack Bulgaria, ECO-ROM Ambalaje (Romania), EKO-KOM (Czech Republic), Envipak (Slovakia), Fost Plus (Belgium), Green Dot Cyprus, Greenpak (Malta), Nedvang (the Netherlands) and Valorlux (Luxembourg).

The manifesto focuses on household packaging and includes five key principles:

  • EPR organizations should be owned by the obliged companies and run on a not for profit basis.
  • There needs to be strong governmental support and monitoring.
  • There are many advantages of having one rather than multiple organizations in each country.
  • The EPR organization needs to be set up in a way that ensures sustainable financing.
  • The EPR organization should contribute to packaging optimization and waste prevention.

A new association will be launched in spring 2013 in Brussels to carry out the EPR principles outlined in the manifesto. The participating PROs seek industry support of the EPR principles.

Subscribe
Receive news and updates from us

GlobalPSC Facebook
 
Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9449 9909
Fax: +61 2 9449 9901
Email: info@globalpsc.net