Posts Tagged ‘Infoactiv’

GlobalPSC Members Feature Prominently at AWRE

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:29 pm, July 31st, 2015Comments1

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In a few weeks, Australasia’s leading waste and recycling expo will feature a variety of GlobalPSC members from plenary talks to debate on e-waste futures.

Stan Krpan, CEO of Sustainability Victoria, will deliver the opening address and provide an environment portfolio CEO’s update. John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer for Infoactiv, will chair a debate on the future of e-waste that also features long-term GlobalPSC members Steve Morriss of Close the Loop and Carmel Dollison of ANZRP/TechCollect. Rose Read of AMTA/MobileMuster will chair and present at a session on going e-waste free in the workplace that also features Joel Newland of Infoactiv.

GlobalPSC members are eligible for a 10% discount on registration for the seminars. Contact us directly for the code to access the discount. Expo attendance itself is free but registration is still required.

Program details are available here.

 

Guest Blog – E-waste Targets Must Go Up

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:41 pm, May 14th, 2015Comments1

john_gertsakisThe Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer for Infoactiv. John is also a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group

 

Clear and logical support grows for increased recycling targets under Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS).

Australia’s electronics recycling scheme is currently subject to an Operational Review by the Australian Government, and many stakeholders, including the Waste Management Association of Australia, are expecting the recycling targets to be sharply increased.

Anything other than a significant increase will continue to exacerbate stockpile creation, questionable recycling practices, and the appalling situation of Co-regulatory Arrangements (industry programs) terminating or minimising collection and recycling services to local councils across urban and regional Australia.

The NTCRS has achieved significant collection and recycling outcomes in a product category that was in urgent need of industry-wide Product Stewardship attention and industry support. The Product Stewardship Act and the subordinate regulations represent landmark policy reform aimed at applying the principles of Extended Producer Responsibility to unwanted, obsolete and end-of-life electronics. Infoactiv remains very supportive of the NTCRS and its achievements to date.

The majority of participating stakeholders wish to see the NTCRS expand and thrive as it continues to deliver measurable environmental, social and economic benefits. However the continuation of ‘easy-to reach’ recycling targets does nothing to demonstrate genuine CSR goals, nor do low targets address the vast volume of television and computer waste that continues to flood into landfills in all States and Territories.

We receive several calls each week from frustrated local councils that have had their collection and recycling service withdrawn by industry Arrangements under the NTCRS. And ‘frustrated’ is the polite translation of how they express their views. These are not isolated instances but a steady stream of municipalities who are now having to bear the cost burden of industry not recycling the very products that they produce and place on the market.

Most importantly, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Minister for the Environment is perfectly placed to significantly increase the enforceable targets under the NTCRS and swiftly deal with several issues that require prompt and decisive attention.

Low-level target increases will continue to aggravate key issues at a time when the scheme needs proactive adjustment by the Australian Government. More information about the Government’s Operational Review that is currently underway can be found here.

Ongoing research and data collection by Planet Ark underscores the importance of the NTCRS given the number of public enquiries received every week wanting information about where and how to recycle unwanted televisions, computers and IT peripherals. Consumers, householders, small business and the wider public have clear expectations that manufacturers and brands in particular must play a greater role in managing the total product life cycle of their product beyond the point of sale and warranties. This merely reflects current activity in many other OECD countries.

In summary, Infoactiv believes that the NTCRS is a fundamentally sound and innovative scheme that addresses a significant and growing resource recovery imperative related to the consumption and disposal of television and IT equipment. The Department of the Environment is to be commended for its efforts in successfully launching and administering the NTCRS since inception in 2011.

Additional detail about our 10 point plan to adjust and improve the NTCRS can be found here.

We also recognise that any new, nationwide initiative such as the NTCRS will experience establishment phase glitches and minor hurdles, which only serve to inform the scheme’s long-term performance and success.

The Environment Minister’s option is very clear; sharply increase the enforceable collection targets, and do it swiftly. This will not only meet community expectation, it will also address the genuine needs of local councils nationwide, especially those that have been ignore by industry.

Most importantly, and often overlooked, is the unequivocal fact that a target increase under the NTCRS will further maximise resource recovery levels and better manage hazardous substances that are otherwise ending up in Australian landfills.

Losing such scarce and non-renewable resources at a time when the solution is available, obvious and uncomplicated would reflect poorly on the necessary policy reforms that are urgently required.

As always, greater public discussion about the NTCRS and how to achieve positive outcomes is welcome and encouraged.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

John Gertsakis is a sustainability practitioner with over 20 years experience as an industry adviser, consultant and research academic. He works on a range of issues including Product Stewardship for electronics and EPR strategy, regulatory analysis, government relations and environmental communications. Through his current position as Chief Sustainability Officer with Infoactiv, John’s work is focused on strategic business development and the design of new stewardship solutions for manufactured durables.

John served as Executive Director of Product Stewardship Australia from 2006 – 2011, representing global consumer electronics brands and OEMs. He was deeply involved as a key advocate of the Product Stewardship Act 2011 and sat on the Implementation Working Group for the NTCRS. He authored Australia’s first report on e-waste product stewardship in 1995 titled: Short Circuiting Waste from Electronic Products. He was also the co-author and editor of Return to Sender: An Introduction to Extended Producer Responsibility (1997). John is also Vice President of the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative, and an Honorary Fellow of the Design Institute of Australia.

 

Two Weeks to Go! Recycling in a Global Economy – GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:32 am, October 13th, 2014Comments0

Recycling in a Global Economy
SMC Conference & Function Centre, 66 Goulburn Street, Sydney
9:00am to 1:00pm

The Global Product Stewardship Council and its members invite you to our latest thought leadership forum featuring Adam Minter, the author of best-selling book Junkyard Planet. Adam is a third-generation scrap dealer turned journalist who’s spent over a decade living in Asia, examining recycling practices first-hand and sharing his insights.

The GlobalPSC and electronics recycler TES-AMM are pleased to provide this first Australian opportunity to hear and meet Adam Minter. Adam’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Adam and other international experts on the implications of Adam’s insights for Australia. Participants will include:

  • Anna Minns, General Manager TerraCycle Australia & New Zealand
  • John Lingelbach, Executive Director of SERI
  • Justin O’Sullivan, Executive Director – Sales Operations of Dell Australia
  • Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of SMaRT Centre, UNSW Australia
  • John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv Group and Product Stewardship Advisory Group member
  • Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Australian Battery Recycling Initiative Chief Executive

Discussions will be facilitated by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin.

Join us to learn and discuss:

  • How is economic growth in China driving demand for recycled materials?
  • How does the global trade in recyclable materials affect recycling in countries like the US and Australia?
  • How can we ensure responsible recycling practices, particularly for e-waste and plastics?
  • How do changing economic conditions both help and hurt recycling and reuse, especially for electronics?
  • What role will the informal sector play in the future of recycling?
  • What are the implications of global material flows for product stewardship?
  • What are incentives and drivers for incorporating Design for Environment and the circular economy in product stewardship?

Registrations are $275 (GST-incl) for non-members of the GlobalPSC and $125 (GST-incl) for GlobalPSC members. Registration and payment information is available here. A light lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

Proudly sponsored by TES-AMM, DellTechCollect and SERI.

 

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GlobalPSC Forms Advisory Group on Product Stewardship and Extended Producer Responsibility

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:02 pm, July 31st, 2014Comments9

GlobalPSC_Advisory_Group_0714At the Global Product Stewardship Council, we take pride in the breadth and depth of experience represented by our members and our extensive global network of those in the know. We regularly seek information and advice from a diverse range of experts across varying product types, regulatory perspectives and program experience. It therefore gives us great pleasure to announce the founding members of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group spanning Europe, Africa, North America and the Asia Pacific:

Brief profiles for GlobalPSC Advisory Group members are provided here.

The GlobalPSC will regularly canvass information and views from the Advisory Group, as we did recently in preparing  submissions to governments on proposed changes to product stewardship and extended producer responsibility frameworks in Nova Scotia and New Zealand. We greatly appreciate their contributions to the continued growth of the GlobalPSC and look forward to working with them in the years to come.

Recycling in a Global Economy – GlobalPSC Thought Leadership Forum

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:48 pm, July 31st, 2014Comments6

Recycling in a Global Economy
SMC Conference & Function Centre, 66 Goulburn Street, Sydney
9:00am to 1:00pm

The Global Product Stewardship Council and its members invite you to our latest thought leadership forum featuring Adam Minter, the author of best-selling book Junkyard Planet. Adam is a third-generation scrap dealer turned journalist who’s spent over a decade living in Asia, examining recycling practices first-hand and sharing his insights.

The GlobalPSC and electronics recycler TES-AMM are pleased to provide this first Australian opportunity to hear and meet Adam Minter. Adam’s presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Adam and other international experts on the implications of Adam’s insights for Australia. Participants will include:

  • Anna Minns, General Manager TerraCycle Australia & New Zealand
  • John Lingelbach, Executive Director of SERI
  • Justin O’Sullivan, Executive Director – Sales Operations of Dell Australia
  • Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Director of SMaRT Centre, UNSW Australia
  • John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv Group and Product Stewardship Advisory Group member
  • Dr Helen Lewis, Principal of Helen Lewis Research and Australian Battery Recycling Initiative Chief Executive

Discussions will be facilitated by GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin.

Join us to learn and discuss:

  • How is economic growth in China driving demand for recycled materials?
  • How does the global trade in recyclable materials affect recycling in countries like the US and Australia?
  • How can we ensure responsible recycling practices, particularly for e-waste and plastics?
  • How do changing economic conditions both help and hurt recycling and reuse, especially for electronics?
  • What role will the informal sector play in the future of recycling?
  • What are the implications of global material flows for product stewardship?
  • What are incentives and drivers for incorporating Design for Environment and the circular economy in product stewardship?

Registrations are $275 (GST-incl) for non-members of the GlobalPSC and $125 (GST-incl) for GlobalPSC members. Registration and payment information is available here. A light lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

Proudly sponsored by TES-AMM, DellTechCollect and SERI.

 

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Emphasis on Product Stewardship in New Zealand

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:05 pm, July 17th, 2014Comments0

Product stewardship is clearly a hot topic of discussion in New Zealand, as reflected in the latest issue of revolve, published by WasteMINZ.

In the issue, WasteMINZ CEO Paul Evans weighs in on likely impacts of the Environment Minister’s recent release of a discussion document on priority waste streams for product stewardship intervention, and further detail is given on the potential designation of priority products.

John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv,  also reflects upon the need for life cycle benefits to drive ‘product stewardship 2.0′.

Check out revolve for further information.

GlobalPSC Launches Key Themes to be Explored with Members

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:39 pm, March 25th, 2014Comments2

Singapore – The Global Product Stewardship Council today announced a series of themes to enable decision makers to more effectively draw upon international experience in product stewardship policy and to help raise the standards of recycling programs globally.

The roundtable discussions, hosted jointly by the GlobalPSC and Infoactiv at the Shangri-La Hotel Singapore, addressed a broad range of chemicals and products amongst key stakeholders including BASF, HP, Apple, Shell and CropLife Asia.

GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin provided a global overview of product stewardship and extended producer responsibility programs then launched the themes being examined by the GlobalPSC, which include:

  • Making meaningful comparisons between programs (especially for recycling rates and key performance measures)
  • The importance of responsible recycling
  • The future of product stewardship
  • Competition amongst producer responsibility organisations and service providers

The GlobalPSC will be refining and prioritising the themes in consultation with GlobalPSC members and sharing results through a variety of approaches. These efforts will be assisted by product stewardship expert Marra Teasdale from her base in Singapore.

The Singapore roundtable was facilitated by Chris Mason and John Gertsakis from Infoactiv, and covered a range of key issues across the product life-cycle from Design for Environment and Cleaner Production through to product use and end-of-life management. Infoactiv’s focus during discussions was to explore the critical importance of regional priorities and cultural sensitivity given the diversity of countries and issues across the Asia Pacific region. The roundtable highlighted that the definition and application of Product Stewardship and EPR can vary dramatically mindful of context, culture and environmental priorities.

GlobalPSC Priority Product Stewardship Workshop Presentations Available

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:50 pm, November 25th, 2013Comments4

On 18 November 2013 in Port Melbourne, Australia, the GlobalPSC brought global leaders on product-specific producer responsibility collection and reprocessing initiatives together to help identify and learn from international best practice to assist Australia’s efforts to develop national product stewardship approaches for batteries, paint and other materials. Featured international speakers included:

• Carl Smith, CEO and President, Call2Recycle (North America)
• Alison Keane, Vice President Government Affairs, American Coatings Association, on behalf of PaintCare
• Mark Kurschner, President, Product Care Association (North America)
• Corinne Faure-Rochu, Director Business Development, Recupyl (France)

An interactive panel session included these speakers and other product-specific experts on batteries and paint from the USA, UK and Australia. Full program and details are available here. A special evening function sponsored by the GlobalPSC, Sustainability Victoria and Infoactiv provided even greater access to this international line-up for GlobalPSC members.

Thanks to our speakers, sponsors and supporters, we were able to make attendance free for GlobalPSC members in proportion to their membership level.

Presentations from the workshop have been provided to attendees and are now available on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members under the Programs category in addition to being searchable in the Knowledge Base.

 

Evolving Nature of Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:41 pm, October 31st, 2013Comments0

By Russ Martin, GlobalPSC CEO

Our current travels are reinforcing the evolving nature of product stewardship. After recently highlighting the evolution of established programs in Canada, we are now seeing evolution of New Zealand’s e-scrap program and the need to better understand how the chemical industry and related players are viewing product stewardship globally.

Product Stewardship from a Risk and Hazard Perspective

I am currently in Singapore for the Asia Pacific OH Conference led by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) and recently-formed Product Stewardship Society (PSS).

As part of a professional development course, I presented on Australia’s chemical assessment and notification requirements in addition to outlining global developments in product stewardship. The presentation will be made available for members on the GlobalPSC Knowledge Base.

The GlobalPSC is a supporter of the event as part of our ongoing outreach within the Asia Pacific region. It also provides an excellent opportunity to better understand regulatory approaches within Asia and to see firsthand how chemical industry giants such as BASF, ExxonMobil Chemical, Shell and others view and implement a version of product stewardship that is different than what most of our colleagues traditionally consider to be product stewardship.

We have long said that product stewardship encompasses broader sustainability issues and entire supply chains. Considerable resources are being directed to a form of product stewardship that is focused on toxicity, risk assessments, hazard reduction and notification requirements that can span 30-40,000 or more products, such as the European REACH requirements.

Fundamental commercial issues such as ability to introduce products into global markets are hot topics of conversation. The focus is not necessarily on traditional considerations such as end of life management, product recovery and costs to local waste management and recycling programs. While ‘our version’ of product stewardship may seem to pale in significance when billions of dollars are at stake, as we see the continued evolution of supply chains there are potential impacts on material substitution, hazards and toxicity (some of the traditional concerns of producer responsibility) that warrant bringing these different views of product stewardship together. We are actively exploring areas of collaboration with the AIHA and PSS to help do so.

We will be providing more detailed analysis of this event for GlobalPSC members, in addition to highlights from next week’s discussions in Taiwan and Electronics Recycling Asia the following week back here in Singapore.

New Zealand Update

One of the GlobalPSC’s longest-serving members, WasteMINZ, conducts an annual conference that serves as the main gathering of the waste and recycling industry in New Zealand. While product stewardship has been a regular theme, its importance was highlighted more in this year’s event than in the previous several years the GlobalPSC has participated.

This year, we were invited to speak on e-scrap, global developments in product stewardship and voluntary vs. regulatory approaches to product stewardship. Interest in the topic and the importance of GlobalPSC members was especially evident in that speakers also included GlobalPSC members Lion, Infoactiv, Sustainability Victoria, eDay New Zealand Trust and 3R Group. In addition, Liz Goodwin of the UK’s WRAP program joined us, and the New Zealand Ministry for Environment was well evident in attendance.

To date, the New Zealand government has focused on a voluntary approach to product stewardship, featuring the accreditation of nine programs to date. In addition, the government has provided funding to assist in the establishment of collection points for e-scrap and a public education campaign on the program’s availability for consumers.

However, pressure has continued to build for a more traditional product stewardship approach for e-scrap in New Zealand. The GlobalPSC and several members, including recycler TES-AMM, were asked to participate in initial discussions on such an approach and to share lessons from the development and implementation of Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme as well as other international programs.

A New Zealand approach won’t necessarily be easy, but it is doable. Australia’s hurdles of low population and market influence, recovery volumes and high logistics costs are further exacerbated in New Zealand. However, a shared e-scrap standard with Australia and key players active in both countries provide a good basis for collaboration. A fresh approach to actively engaging these key stakeholders, improving on some pre-existing relationships, moving forward from the blame game and building upon existing infrastructure and material flows will be essential first steps.

Priority Product Stewardship

We are seeing an especially strong response from members and other interested parties to the priority product stewardship workshop that the GlobalPSC is holding 18 November in Australia. The workshop features GlobalPSC members PaintCare, Call2Recycle and the Product Care Association. Panel participants will also include GlobalPSC members representing the Australian paint industry and the state governments leading efforts to develop product stewardship initiatives for batteries and paint, Queensland and Victoria, respectively.

We’ll have speakers from four countries addressing paint, batteries, household hazardous waste and a range of other products as part of the GlobalPSC’s facilitation of national product stewardship approaches for batteries and paint in Australia. We are lucky to have these global leaders on product recovery making themselves available to share their insights as Australia seeks to evolve several product stewardship initiatives.

Thanks to our principal speakers and other members TES-AMM and DHL Supply Chain, we can make the workshop available at no charge for GlobalPSC members. However, registration is necessary so let us know if you’ll be able to join us.

 

Australia Establishes Priority Products for Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:46 pm, July 4th, 2013Comments12

Australia has released a priority list of products potentially covered under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 (the Act). The Act provides a framework for establishing voluntary, co-regulatory and regulatory approaches for product stewardship. Under the Act, any future mandatory or co-regulatory approach must be preceded by 12 months notice before a particular product can have such a regulatory approach applied.

The designated products include:

  • Waste architectural and decorative paint
  • End-of-life handheld batteries (less than 2kg in weight)
  • Packaging (and subsets of packaging, such as consumer packaging and beverage packaging)
  • End-of-life air conditioners with small gas charges
  • End-of-life refrigerators with small gas charges

The reasons given for their inclusion on the list are available here. In April 2013, Environment Ministers from Australia and New Zealand acting as the  Standing Council on Environment and Water (SCEW) added end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint to their work plan. Preparation of a Decision Regulation Impact Statement is also underway for packaging.

Australia’s Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, the Hon Amanda Rishworth MP, sought advice from a range of sources including the Product Stewardship Advisory Group, the SCEW, jurisdictional priorities, industry stakeholders, and international obligations in determining the list.

The Global Product Stewardship Council and GlobalPSC members serving on the Product Stewardship Advisory Group include:

The GlobalPSC has been working closely with the Australian Government and jurisdictions to draw upon international experience and expertise to further develop sensible, practical product stewardship approaches.

 

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