Posts Tagged ‘MS2’

GlobalPSC Expands Board for Greater Program and North American Coverage

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:22 pm, December 18th, 2015Comments2

The GlobalPSC Executive Committee (Board) recently expanded its coverage to include more members with practical program experience in implementing North American product stewardship and extended producer responsibility (EPR) approaches in addition to further deepening its policy expertise. These additions were reaffirmed and complemented by the Board and GlobalPSC members during our recent Annual General Meeting (AGM). These changes will further the GlobalPSC vision of facilitating the development and implementation of effective product stewardship schemes globally.

Recently, the Board expanded its coverage to include David Lawes (BC Used Oil Management Association), Kylie Hughes (Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection) and Mark Kurschner (Product Care Association). During the AGM, Carl Smith (Call2Recycle) was also appointed to the Board. All Board appointments, including long-serving members Scott CasselGarth Hickle and Ed Cordner were affirmed during the AGM and are valid for one year.

The GlobalPSC Board recognises the invaluable contributions of Neil Hastie during his years of service on the Board and as President. Neil has elected to step back from his GlobalPSC duties to focus on other pursuits. Neil has our continued appreciation and support.

During the AGM, the following Board members were elected as office-holders for one-year terms:

The President’s Report and Financial Report from the AGM are available to members.

 

Consultation on New Zealand e-Waste Product Stewardship Draft Report

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:40 pm, May 14th, 2015Comments0

The team developing an e-waste product stewardship framework for New Zealand has released a Draft Report to stakeholders for comment.

The report contains domestic and international issues for managing e-waste, stakeholder input, data analysis, options considered and a recommended framework.

Stakeholders are invited to email written comments on the #eWasteNZ Draft Report to ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com by Friday 22 May 2015 in order to help inform a final version that will be submitted to the Ministry for the Environment for consideration. If any difficulties accessing the document arise, a PDF version is available by emailing ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com.

 

eWasteNZ Preliminary Report and Stakeholder Summary Available

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:47 pm, October 27th, 2014Comments2

The first stakeholder workshop for the #eWasteNZ project was held 19 September 2014 in Auckland. Participants included 45 diverse stakeholders, plus the e-waste project team and representatives from the New Zealand Ministry for Environment (MfE). A high level summary of the workshop discussions and outcomes is now available.

Prior to the workshop, participating stakeholders had been sent the project’s Preliminary Report for background information and questions to be considered. During the workshop the project team summarised key issues and reviewed the questions from the Preliminary Report.

The next stage of the project will be to collate responses to the Preliminary Report previously issued to all stakeholders. These responses and the outcomes of Workshop 1 will help to inform the Draft Report. Comments on the Preliminary Report are due by Friday 14 November.

The #eWasteNZ project is being delivered through a partnership of companies, led and managed by SLR Consulting, with MS2 as technical lead and supported by Synergine and Equilibrium. MS2 is a Foundation Member of the GlobalPSC and Director Russ Martin also serves as our CEO.

For further project details, email ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com.

Australian Battery Stewardship Stakeholder Workshop Results

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:28 pm, August 30th, 2013Comments5

On 13 August 2013, battery stakeholders and government representatives met in Brisbane to discuss the development of a national battery product stewardship scheme for Australia. The Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP), a GlobalPSC member, is the lead jurisdiction on batteries for Australia’s governments.

Workshop attendees considered four questions in relation to a scheme—

  1. the vision for the program;
  2. the scope (which types of batteries should be covered and why);
  3. the form of the scheme and;
  4. effectiveness of the program in addressing the public policy and business case considerations.

After opening comments and discussions with The Hon. Andrew Powell, Queensland’s Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection, attendees were split into four groups to discuss each question separately. The groups then reported back and their responses were compiled. A summary of the workshop has been posted on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC Members.

(L-R: Dr Diana Wright, First Assistant Secretary, Australian Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities; Andrew Chesterman, Director-General, EHP; Fiona Proctor, Minister’s Media Advisor; The Hon. Andrew Powell, Minister for EHP; Tony Roberts, Deputy Director-General, EHP; Bill Ford of Toshiba)

 

The GlobalPSC and its members have been active in the program’s development. GlobalPSC Foundation Members MS2 led the development of the business and public policy case for battery stewardship on behalf of Australia’s Victorian Government. The report was circulated to attendees in advance of the workshop. GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin, who was recently appointed as the independent chair of Australia’s Battery Implementation Working Group, facilitated the workshop. The GlobalPSC also facilitated earlier discussions on battery product stewardship with one of our longest-standing government members, Sustainability Victoria, and the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative.

GlobalPSC Facilitating National Battery Product Stewardship for Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:31 pm, August 13th, 2013Comments4

Global Product Stewardship Council CEO Russ Martin has been appointed as the independent chair of Australia’s Battery Implementation Working Group to help develop a national product stewardship approach for handheld batteries.

Russ’s appointment builds on earlier efforts on batteries, including facilitating initial stakeholder discussions and leading the development of the business and public policy case for battery stewardship (report available here) on behalf of the Victorian Government by GlobalPSC Foundation Members MS2.

Environment Ministers from Australia and New Zealand have agreed on the need to include end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint in the Standing Council on Environment and Water’s work plan.
The Australian Government has also identified handheld batteries as priority products potentially covered under Australia’s Product Stewardship Act. The GlobalPSC and several members serve on the Product Stewardship Advisory Group recommending products for consideration as priority products.

Australia Establishes Priority Products for Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:46 pm, July 4th, 2013Comments12

Australia has released a priority list of products potentially covered under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 (the Act). The Act provides a framework for establishing voluntary, co-regulatory and regulatory approaches for product stewardship. Under the Act, any future mandatory or co-regulatory approach must be preceded by 12 months notice before a particular product can have such a regulatory approach applied.

The designated products include:

  • Waste architectural and decorative paint
  • End-of-life handheld batteries (less than 2kg in weight)
  • Packaging (and subsets of packaging, such as consumer packaging and beverage packaging)
  • End-of-life air conditioners with small gas charges
  • End-of-life refrigerators with small gas charges

The reasons given for their inclusion on the list are available here. In April 2013, Environment Ministers from Australia and New Zealand acting as the  Standing Council on Environment and Water (SCEW) added end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint to their work plan. Preparation of a Decision Regulation Impact Statement is also underway for packaging.

Australia’s Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, the Hon Amanda Rishworth MP, sought advice from a range of sources including the Product Stewardship Advisory Group, the SCEW, jurisdictional priorities, industry stakeholders, and international obligations in determining the list.

The Global Product Stewardship Council and GlobalPSC members serving on the Product Stewardship Advisory Group include:

The GlobalPSC has been working closely with the Australian Government and jurisdictions to draw upon international experience and expertise to further develop sensible, practical product stewardship approaches.

 

Product Stewardship Goes Mainstream Through Effective Leadership

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:23 pm, April 22nd, 2013Comments1

 

 

 

As further proof that product stewardship and producer responsibility are making serious inroads into traditional waste management, recycling and resource issues, two product stewardship experts in Australia have made the cut for the top five nominees in the Resources & Waste category of the 2013 WME magazine Leaders List Awards. GlobalPSC President Russ Martin and Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv John Gertsakis have worked for decades to advance product stewardship, so it’s great to see such recognition for their hard work.

Both Russ and John see the commercial and environmental value of effective product stewardship working across diverse product categories and industry sectors, from batteries and e-waste through to paint, commercial furniture and various other manufactured goods. Most importantly, they recognise that life cycle thinking and design innovation are essential elements in achieving a more coherent and sustainable approach to product stewardship.

Help promote product stewardship by going to the WME home page and click on the top left banner to vote for either Russ or John in the Resources & Waste category.

Australia Seeks Feedback on Amendments to National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:09 pm, April 17th, 2013Comments1

The Australian Government today released a discussion paper which proposes amendments to the regulations governing the administration of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.

Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP said the public consultation period offers an opportunity for interested parties to help build on the early success of the scheme.

“The discussion paper is based on the experiences gained during the scheme’s first year of operation and on feedback from the television and computer industry organisations running the scheme,” Ms Rishworth said.

“Given its ground-breaking nature, we commenced the scheme anticipating that operational experiences would identify further opportunities to fine-tune and enhance the scheme as it matured. After twelve months the signs are that the scheme is progressing well, and by monitoring the roll-out closely we’ve been able to identify some enhancements to strengthen it further.”

Through its own analysis, together with broad stakeholder feedback, the government has identified four key areas where the scheme could be further enhanced.

These are:

  • better matching of product codes and conversion factors (as assisted by MS2)
  • strengthening the capacity of co-regulatory arrangements (including DHL Supply Chain) to manage risk
  • simplifying administrative processes for e-waste collection and recycling
  • aligning the scheme’s activities more closely with the waste stream and the community’s requirements for recycling.

To address these areas, the government is proposing amendments to the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations 2011, with effect from 1 July 2013.

Ms Rishworth said the government is pleased with the roll out and the initial success of the scheme.

“Since commencing on-ground activity in May 2012, thousands of tonnes of unwanted televisions and computers have already been recycled and over two hundred collection services have been established across Australia.”

“The scheme is achieving what it was set up to do—reduce the amount of e-waste going to landfill by providing householders and small business with free access to recycling services across the country—and these amendments will ensure its continued success.”

As part of a possible second phase of amendments to take place after 30 June 2014, the consultation is also seeking views on whether there is benefit in extending the scope of the scheme to cover similar electronic products, such as home entertainment equipment including video cassette recorders, DVD players, set top boxes, video game consoles and stereo equipment; refining the calculation of the total ‘waste arising’ and further refining product codes and conversion factors.

The discussion paper is available here.

Submissions are due by 7 May and can be submitted to ewaste@environment.gov.au.

Stakeholder forums will be held during April and May 2013 to discuss the proposed amendments. Dates and venues for the stakeholder forums will be available on the department’s website at www.environment.gov.au/ewaste.

The National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is industry funded and run, but regulated by the Australian Government under the landmark Product Stewardship Act 2011.

Information from media release by The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP dated 17 April 2013 titled Amendments to National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme released for public comment.

Australian Environment Ministers Take Action on Batteries and Paint

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:57 pm, April 11th, 2013Comments15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environment Ministers from Australia have agreed on the need to include end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint in the Standing Council on Environment and Water’s (SCEW) work plan. In the communique announcing the decision, SCEW stated,

“More than 264 million handheld batteries reach the end of their useful life each year and the equivalent of 18,000 tonnes of paint require disposal each year. There could be significant environmental and community benefits to be gained from working with industry to find better management solutions for these products. Ministers asked officials to develop a work program and examine funding arrangements to progress these issues.”

The Global Product Stewardship Council and GlobalPSC members have been actively facilitating the development of product stewardship for both batteries and paint to help transition from government-funded takeback schemes to industry-led producer responsibility. In addition to running pilot projects, Government members Sustainability Victoria (SV) have been engaging industry players to develop practical approaches to product stewardship for the products.

Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) Chief Executive Dr Helen Lewis supported the SCEW decision, telling the GlobalPSC,

“This decision represents a significant milestone in ABRI’s campaign to promote the development of sustainable recovery programs for used batteries. We look forward to working with environment ministers and other stakeholders to explore options to increase recycling of handheld batteries. We need to ensure that everyone involved in the production or consumption of batteries – from the manufacturer or importer through to the consumer – plays their part in ensuring that batteries are used and recovered in a sustainable way.”

In conjunction with SV and ABRI, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, with an aim to developing a strategic plan to address domestic battery stewardship over the next three years. GlobalPSC Foundation members MS2 have also been incorporating GlobalPSC program expertise and data in developing the public policy and business case on handheld battery product stewardship for SV.

GlobalPSC member the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation (APMF) is collaborating with SV on an industry-led pilot program to collect trade waste data and to examine the most efficient and environmentally sound ways to collect and treat waste paint. The GlobalPSC is incorporating trial results in helping SV develop the public policy and business case for paint stewardship.

Richard Phillips, Executive Director of the APMF, also supported the decision by Environment Ministers and discussed plans for further research,

“The APMF supports the SCEW decision to include waste architectural and decorative paints in its work plan. A key element of our current Strategic Plan involves working with Governments on a future product stewardship scheme for waste architectural and decorative paint. When looking to the future, the APMF Council believes that a voluntary industry program has the potential to provide a cost effective and efficient product stewardship scheme for our sector. The current PaintCare trial program in Victoria also acknowledges that any future product stewardship program should also consider the issue of waste paint generated from the trade sector. Currently, there is no collection service in any state or territory for trade waste paint. The APMF also believes that further research is now warranted. Hence, we are funding a joint research project with Sustainability Victoria for Swinburne University of Technology to generate new research into better and more environmental friendly ways to address waste paint.”

John Polhill, Product Stewardship Specialist – Waste Strategy with SV, reinforced the importance of collaboration,

“The Victorian Government is committed to working with industry to effectively manage problematic products in accordance with Victorian and national waste policy. The work with ABRI and APMF demonstrates the success of industry-government partnerships thusfar.”

The GlobalPSC and several members have been appointed by the Australian Government to a Product Stewardship Advisory Group that provides independent advice to the government on products that could be considered for attention under the Product Stewardship Act. The SCEW work plan operates in conjunction with the Product Stewardship Advisory Group to explore opportunities for management of priority products.

 

Global Perspective on Broader Producer Responsibility

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:56 pm, September 11th, 2012Comments0

By Russ Martin, Global Product Stewardship Council President

The GlobalPSC’s own Russ Martin recently wrote on global developments in broader producer responsibility for Sustainability Matters. The article is now available here.

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9449 9909
Fax: +61 2 9449 9901
Email: info@globalpsc.net