Posts Tagged ‘paint’

GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate Member – Paintback

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:42 pm, December 8th, 2017Comments0

 

 

Paintback® is taking unwanted paint and packaging’s colourful past to a brighter future of responsible disposal and innovative reuse. As a voluntary product stewardship scheme that has operated in all States and Territories of Australia from day one, it is a world-first initiative designed to keep unwanted paint out of landfill and away from vital waterways.

Most importantly, Paintback is driven by the Australian paint industry – by the major companies that supply around 95% of all the architectural and decorative (A&D) paint sold in Australia. DuluxGroup, Haymes Paint, PPG, Resene and Valspar are the founding members.

These companies have collaborated with Commonwealth, State and Local governments to provide a nationally consistent collection service for households and commercial painters.  Paintback repurposes valuable materials into recycled packaging, alternative energy and industrial processes, and is funding research to find better uses for unwanted paint.

Established in 2016, Paintback has been recognised by the Australian Business Awards, Sustainability Category for 2017.

For more information, go to www.paintback.com.au.

 

National Voluntary Paint Stewardship Scheme Launched in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:04 pm, May 1st, 2016Comments1

[L-R: Master Painter Stephen Papdan; Federal Environment Minister the Hon Greg Hunt MP; Master Painter Damien McRyan; Sustainability Victoria CEO Stan Krpan; Paintback Chief Executive Karen Gomez; Paintback Independent Chairperson Jim Liaskos]

 

Australia has just launched what is believed to be the world’s first, all-encompassing national voluntary stewardship scheme for waste paint* and paint packaging, Paintback. The program, founded by paint producers DuluxGroup, Haymes, PPG, Resene and Valspar, was launched 29 April in Melbourne by the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Australia’s Minister for the Environment.

The program will be funded through a levy of 15 cents per litre (plus GST) on new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.  The levy was approved by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to fund the collection and treatment of waste paint nationally, education campaigns and research for new uses of waste paint by Paintback Ltd, a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the end-of-life management of waste paint and packaging.

Paintback will build upon a range of collaborative efforts between industry and governments. Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister nominated paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 in June 2013. The multi-stakeholder National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the ACCC for approval of the levy.

The GlobalPSC helped facilitate development of the scheme. In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents are available under the Paint category on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

* New Zealand accredited a voluntary paint collection program called Paintwise funded through a voluntary levy on Resene paint sold and from separate fees on non-Resene branded paint and trade waste paint.

 

GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate Member – The Compliance Map Ltd

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:22 pm, March 11th, 2016Comments1

 

Compliance Map develops solutions to help businesses manage their environmental compliance obligations arising from regulations and directives and to help optimize their use of resources. This includes product stewardship responsibilities, reporting and minimization of waste as well as carbon disclosure that will play a significant part in identifying, monitoring and driving down their customer’s global environmental impacts.

Both Product Stewardship and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) regulations and standards are at the core of Compliance Map’s solution offering. This includes mechanisms to collect, store and produce remittance reports required for submission to EPR schemes for directives such as WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment), Battery as well as deposit and worldwide Packaging programmes. The solution offered automatically manages sales warehousing data and combines with relevant Packaging, WEEE, Battery, Oil, Beverage or Paint information to produce costs and weight reports ready to be remitted to registered schemes on a monthly, quarterly or annually basis. This enables companies to automate the entire process by which they track and report waste to schemes and programmes worldwide and make better use of their own resources.

Compliance Map are made of a team of regulatory compliance experts with over 20+ years of experience in the arena of environmental compliance which has been fed into their software solution offerings, creating a holistic approach to managing obligations businesses face in today’s regulatory climate.

 

Approval for Voluntary National Australian Paint Product Stewardship Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:04 pm, October 29th, 2015Comments1

A voluntary national product stewardship scheme today received regulatory approval for an A$0.15/litre levy to be applied to the sale of new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.

Levy revenue will fund the not-for-profit company Paint Stewardship Ltd to administer all aspects of the collection scheme, including education, marketing and communication, R&D investment, transport and processing of waste paint from trade and domestic sources across the country. The scheme is expected to commence in May 2016.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (the ACCC) today approved the application for authorisation lodged by the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, Paint Stewardship Limited and certain paint manufacturers and wholesalers on 1 July 2015. The ACCC approval of the levy extends through 1 June 2021.

The National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the ACCC for approval of the levy.

The GlobalPSC and several of our members have helped facilitate development of the scheme since Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister’s June 2013 nomination of paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011.

In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents, including today’s determination and rationale for the decision, are available under the Paint category on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

Progressing Voluntary Paint Stewardship in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:28 pm, August 12th, 2015Comments1

iStock_000006361563SmallA voluntary national product stewardship scheme has moved one step closer to reality in Australia with the recent application for regulatory approval of an A$0.15/litre levy to be applied to the sale of new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.

Levy revenue would fund the not-for-profit company Paint Stewardship Ltd to administer all aspects of the collection scheme, including education, marketing and communication, R&D investment, transport and processing of waste paint from trade and domestic sources across the country.

The National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group has completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) for approval of the levy. Assuming a favourable assessment by the ACCC against the Competition and Consumer Act, the scheme is expected to commence in May 2016.

The GlobalPSC and several of our members have helped facilitate development of the scheme since Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister’s June 2013 nomination of paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011.

In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents are available on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

Melissa Walsh Innes and Mark Kurschner Appointed to GlobalPSC Advisory Group

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:50 am, January 31st, 2015Comments1

We are proud to announce the appointment of two esteemed colleagues, Melissa Walsh Innes and Mark Kurschner, to the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

The GlobalPSC and a number of our members have worked closely with Melissa and Mark over the years, and they bring a wealth of experience to these new roles on our Advisory Group.

As a legislator with the US state of Maine, Melissa was the sponsor of Maine’s first-in-the-nation Product Stewardship Framework Law of 2010, as well as the sponsor of a successful electronic recycling program expansion in 2011 (both enacted with unanimous bipartisan support). Melissa is the former deputy director for Recycling Reinvented, a US national nonprofit working to advance recycling policies to increase national recycling rates for packaging and printed paper. She is currently President of Innes & Company LLC, a US-based consultancy assisting clients around the globe in reaching their goals in the areas of product stewardship and sustainability.

Mark is the President of Product Care Association, a non-profit industry association that manages extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship programs across Canada and in the US. Product Care manages programs on behalf of its members and also as program manager for other stewardship organizations. Products and programs managed by Product Care include paint, lighting products, flammable liquids, pesticides, smoke alarms, as well as large and small appliances and outdoor power equipment. Product Care also worked with PaintCare to initiate the US Paint Recycling program and on January 1, 2015 launched the Washington State Mercury Containing Lamps program. Product Care also works with the US mattress industry for their product stewardship programs which also begin in 2015. Mark is a qualified lawyer and became the president of Product Care in 2002.

GlobalPSC Member – Innes & Company LLC

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:36 pm, January 28th, 2015Comments2

Innes & Company LLC is a U.S.-based consultancy assisting clients around the globe in reaching their goals in the areas of product stewardship and sustainability.

Innes & Company President Melissa Walsh Innes is a former legislator with extensive experience in recycling and product stewardship legislation, including packaging, paint, medical sharps, pharmaceuticals, compact fluorescent lamps, electronics, and containers.

Melissa was the sponsor of Maine’s first-in-the-nation Product Stewardship Framework Law of 2010, as well as the sponsor of a successful electronic recycling program expansion in 2011 (both enacted with unanimous bipartisan support).

Melissa is the former deputy director for Recycling Reinvented, a U.S. national nonprofit working to advance recycling policies to increase national recycling rates for packaging and printed paper. Her experience at Recycling Reinvented incorporated best practices from recycling experts around the world, knowledge that Melissa uses to benefit the clients of Innes & Company.

In her time at Recycling Reinvented, Melissa further honed her skills in client engagement, stakeholder relations, media outreach, organization development, and policy crafting.

Melissa’s experience and approach to policy negotiation and stakeholder relations includes working side by side with a variety of stakeholders, from environmental organizations to chambers of commerce. Innes & Company helps clients achieve their policy goals using the same successful approach.

Contact details include:
400 East Elm Street
Yarmouth, Maine 04096  USA
207.847.3177 (office)
melissa@innesandcompany.com
Twitter: @InnesReport

Melissa also serves as a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

EPR’s Next Steps – US EPR Analysis by Scott Cassel

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:19 pm, December 21st, 2014Comments0

scottBack in 2000 the terms “product stewardship” and “extended producer responsibility” were rarely uttered in the U.S. Today there are 84 EPR laws in 33 states across 12 product categories.

These laws are spreading both in the U.S. and around the world, and for three basic reasons: They have saved millions of dollars for government agencies, they have created jobs and they have reduced waste by using materials more sustainably.

A recent article posted by Scott Cassel of the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) in the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members provides a status update on EPR systems in the U.S. It identifies which products provide the greatest lessons and which offer new or emerging opportunities. It also lays out PSI’s ‘elements of a good EPR law’ and discusses key issues being debated in the field.

 

Guest Blog – ACA and PaintCare: Driving a Post-Consumer Paint Solution

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:24 pm, September 23rd, 2014Comments1

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Alison Keane, Vice President for Government Affairs with the American Coatings Association. She is also the General Counsel and Corporate Secretary for the Association’s PaintCare product stewardship organization.

Alison has been an active participant and speaker at Global Product Stewardship Council events, including the GlobalPSC’s International Product Stewardship Summit and Priority Product Stewardship Workshop

 

Today’s paints offer consumers the aesthetic value they seek, as well as the protective properties necessary to safeguard their valuable assets. Additionally, environmental consciousness has pushed coatings technology toward creating more eco-friendly, sustainable products. The results are safer and easier to use paints that deliver top quality aesthetics and protection.

Despite its many valuable uses, paint – when disposed of – is often the largest volume product collected by municipal household hazardous waste (HHW) programs: an estimated 10 percent of the more than 650 million gallons of architectural paint (paint used to coat the interior and exterior of houses and other structures) sold each year in the United States goes unused. Much, if not most of this is latex – which is considered “non-hazardous” according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) testing protocols. This paint is typically managed along with other products in HHW programs as a hazardous waste, which can be very costly. In addition, management of latex paint poses a challenge for many municipalities and counties because liquid latex paint cannot be disposed of as “mixed municipal solid waste” in the regular waste stream. However, latex paint has potential for recycling and diversion from landfills, and as such, the paint industry favors not regarding leftover paint as waste but rather as a resource that is meant to be completely used or reused.

Yet, while leftover paint can be captured for reuse, recycling, energy recovery or safe disposal, doing so requires public awareness and a convenient and effective local collection system. Many municipal, locally operated HHW programs have been collecting paint for many years; however, as paint collection is expensive, many have discontinued collecting latex, instead directing the consumer to dry and dispose of it through their regular garbage. With continuing budget constraints, this is a trend that is gaining acceptance. Simply put, post-consumer paint collection is currently beyond the capacity of, and budgets for, many local governments.

Thus, the paint industry supports and has championed an extended producer responsibility (EPR) or product stewardship approach, an approach that is increasingly being implemented in the United States and in other countries for other products. Product stewardship is a principle that directs all participants involved in the life cycle of a product to take shared responsibility for the impacts to human health and the natural environment that result from the production, use, and end-of-life management of the product. EPR principles assert that it is in the best interests of state and local governments that manufacturers manage environmentally sound and cost-effective end-of-life stewardship programs for their products. These terms, EPR and product stewardship – often used interchangeably – allow a reduction of overall system costs by privatizing the end-of-life management for products and shifting the cost burden from rate and tax payers to users and producers of the products. All participants in the life-cycle of a product have a role to play – manufacturers, retailers, consumers, and government. However, if producers are going to have the primary responsibility for the end-of-life management of their products, they must be given the ability to develop, own and operate the programs – and not simply be forced to fund current programs.

The American Coatings Association (ACA), after more than five years of promoting a model solution for post-consumer paint management, was instrumental in securing passage of the first-ever paint product stewardship law in the United States in the state of Oregon in July 2009. Since then, parallel legislation has been enacted in California, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Minnesota, Maine, and Colorado. ACA has created a new 501(c)(3) organization – PaintCare® – to run the program, which directs an industry-led end-of-life management program for post-consumer architectural paint; that is, both oil-based and latex paint used for the interior and exterior of buildings that are sold in containers of five gallons or less. This model solution was developed as part of an agreement with federal, state and local government stakeholders.

The PaintCare® program institutes a true product stewardship model that ensures environmentally sensitive end-of-life management for leftover paint, while relieving local and state governments of their economic burden, without creating new, expensive local or state-run programs.

Model legislation was crafted through a dialogue facilitated by the Product Stewardship Institute, a sister organization and member of the Global Product Stewardship Council. The legislation was crafted to ensure that there would not be any free-riders (all producers must participate) and to establish a sustainable financing system. The financing system is termed a “paint stewardship assessment”. The law defines this as “the amount added to the purchase price of architectural paint sold in [the state] necessary to cover the cost of collecting, transporting and processing the post-consumer architectural paint managed through a statewide architectural paint stewardship program”. This assessment is paid to PaintCare® by producers for all architectural paint sold in states where the program is operating and is then uniformly added to the final retail price of paint in order to ensure adequate funding for the program and a level playing field for all producers and retailers.

In addition to using the funding for the operational aspects of the program – collection, transportation and processing – the funding also is used for administrative costs. These costs include submittal of a comprehensive plan to the state agency in charge of oversight as well as an annual report on the progress of the program. In addition, PaintCare® financing is used to educate consumers about the issue, including reducing post-consumer paint waste, collection and recycling opportunities and how the program is financed. Education and outreach on purchasing the right amount, using it up and recycling the rest is paramount to the program; if we can reduce the waste paint generation in the first place, we can save valuable resources and reduce the costs of the program over time. Identifying and supporting recycling efforts – leftover paint back into paint or other products – is also part of the program’s goals.

As mentioned above, eight states have enacted legislation to establish the PaintCare® program and it is important to mention that these laws have been consistent across the states. A primary purpose of the industry’s pro-action on the issue was to ensure that the industry would not be facing 50 different state solutions to the issue, but rather one nationally coordinated approach. PaintCare® has had remarkable success in just its first four years. In fact, the Oregon program was only intended to be a four-year pilot, but due to its incontrovertible success, the PaintCare® program was made permanent by law last year.

All in all, PaintCare® has over 1,000 collection sites for post-consumer paint in the 5 states currently operating and has collected and recycled in excess of 2 million gallons of paint. An ancillary benefit is the container recycling that has also been realized by the program with over 700 tons of plastic and metal cans having been recycled through the program. These numbers will only continue to grow as existing programs expand, Minnesota, Maine and Colorado begin implementation over the next year and new states come on board.

PaintCare® is a win-win, and state and local governments are carefully tracking the success of PaintCare®’s program throughout the states in which it is operating with an eye toward adopting the program. Other countries such as Australia, the UK, and Brazil are interested in the model. While ACA and PaintCare® owe much to our counterpart in Canada, Product Care, we are committed to growing to be the best, most effective program for paint stewardship on the globe!

For more information about PaintCare®, please visit www.PaintCare.org, or contact ACA’s Alison Keane (akeane@paint.org) or PaintCare®’s Marjaneh Zarrehparvar (mzarrehparvar@paint.org) at (202) 462-6272.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council.

Alison Keane is an environmental attorney with 20 years’ experience in both the private and governmental sectors. She is currently the Vice President for Government Affairs with the American Coatings Association, responsible for the Association’s advocacy activities on behalf of paint and coating manufacturers in the US. She is also the General Counsel and Corporate Secretary for the Association’s PaintCare product stewardship organization. Other employment experience includes the Environmental Protection Agency’s Headquarters office, the Maryland State Senate and private practice. Alison has her BA in Biology from St. Mary’s College of Maryland and her JD from Golden Gate University in San Francisco. She is admitted to the practice of law in both Maryland and the District of Columbia.

 

Waste Trade Paint Trial Report Available

Posted by GlobalPSC at 10:02 am, December 31st, 2013Comments1

The final report on a waste trade paint trial in the Australian state of Victoria is now available. The trial was led by two Global Product Stewardship Council members, Sustainability Victoria (SV) and the Australian Paint Manufacturers Federation (APMF).

Pictured are (L-R): John Polhill (SV), Richard Phillips (APMF), Mark Amos (Master Painters Australia Victoria), the Hon David Morris (MP for Mornington) and Matt Genever (SV)

From 31 March through to 31 August 2013, service provider Toxfree partnered with SV, APMF and the Master Painters Association to conduct the ‘PaintCare’ trial at six existing Detox Your Home sites for the purpose of collecting, managing and disposing of waste trade paint and providing previously unknown data on the potential volume of unwanted trade paint in the trade community, as well as behaviour patterns of participating trade painters.

A total of 127.6 tonnes was collected and processed during the trial. Comparison of sales and recovery data provides an indication of a time lag between purchase and disposal. The data also shows that a higher rate of water-based paints will be likely in future collections.

 

Subscribe
Receive news and updates from us

GlobalPSC Facebook
 
Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9489 8851
Fax: +61 2 9489 8553
Email: info@globalpsc.net