Posts Tagged ‘producer responsibility’

GlobalPSC Government Member – Department of the Environment and Energy

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:27 pm, June 7th, 2017Comments0

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The Department of the Environment and Energy administers Australia’s Product Stewardship Act 2011 which provides a framework to effectively manage the environmental, health and safety impacts of products, and in particular those impacts associated with the disposal of products. The framework allows for voluntary industry led schemes, co-regulatory and mandatory product stewardship. More information on the legislation and product stewardship in general can be found here.

 

GlobalPSC Member Profile – Valoryza

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:49 pm, April 26th, 2017Comments0

Based in Santiago, Chile, Valoryza Environmental Advisors offer strategic advice and expertise to cost-effectively support compliance with extended producer responsibility (EPR), by way of product stewardship programs to producers and organizations that are affected by environmental regulations.

As a regional expert with access to a global best practice network, Valoryza assists local and foreign companies in navigating through and succeeding within Latin American waste management regulatory systems and frameworks.

Key services include, but not are limited to, those listed below.

Offering representation and consultancy services to:

  • Chilean industries seeking to participate in the elaboration and detailed design of the EPR systems.
  • International companies with obligations under the EPR and other environmental regulations.

Strategic advice:

  • Design, implementation and administration of waste management systems under EPR regulations.
  • Cost-effective management of product impacts, in line with product stewardship requirements.
  • Elaboration of Strategic Plans to help guide companies as they face new challenges related to new and more demanding environmental regulations.

Solution design, implementation and management for:

  • Source separation, collection, packaging, processing and re-use of all types of waste.
  • Waste management aimed at recovery services to ensure the fulfillment of business sustainability goals and environmental commitments with both local and national authorities.

Valoryza consultants have extensive experience in conducting investigation, research studies, audits, assessments and developing strategic forecasts to support clients in meeting their obligations regarding manufacturing, waste management, sorting, transport and final disposal in the most responsible and cost-effective way.

If you represent a business with opportunities related to EPR, waste management or other environmental matters in Latin America, Valoryza is available to help.

Contact:

Rodrigo Leiva Neumann
General Manager
+56 9 72143053

Rodrigo.leiva@valoryza.com

 

An Auspicious Time for Change – Review of Australia’s Product Stewardship Act

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:17 pm, April 26th, 2017Comments0

 

 

Australia’s Product Stewardship Act requires a five-year review that has been announced but has yet to be initiated. Conducting the review as a priority could help address a plethora of social, economic and environmental issues, and result in additional economic development and job creation.

The GlobalPSC will be active in the Act’s review in coordination with the Australian Department of Environment and Energy. GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin recently assessed some of the opportunities for improvement through the review for CWS magazine. This assessment is now available online or as a PDF.

 

GlobalPSC Member Profile – Valoryza

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:53 am, June 29th, 2016Comments0

Based in Santiago, Chile, Valoryza Environmental Advisors offer strategic advice and expertise to cost-effectively support compliance with extended producer responsibility (EPR), by way of product stewardship programs to producers and organizations that are affected by environmental regulations.

As a regional expert with access to a global best practice network, Valoryza assists local and foreign companies in navigating through and succeeding within Latin American waste management regulatory systems and frameworks.

Key services include, but not are limited to, those listed below.

Offering representation and consultancy services to:

  • Chilean industries seeking to participate in the elaboration and detailed design of the EPR systems.
  • International companies with obligations under the EPR and other environmental regulations.

Strategic advice:

  • Design, implementation and administration of waste management systems under EPR regulations.
  • Cost-effective management of product impacts, in line with product stewardship requirements.
  • Elaboration of Strategic Plans to help guide companies as they face new challenges related to new and more demanding environmental regulations.

Solution design, implementation and management for:

  • Source separation, collection, packaging, processing and re-use of all types of waste.
  • Waste management aimed at recovery services to ensure the fulfillment of business sustainability goals and environmental commitments with both local and national authorities.

Valoryza consultants have extensive experience in conducting investigation, research studies, audits, assessments and developing strategic forecasts to support clients in meeting their obligations regarding manufacturing, waste management, sorting, transport and final disposal in the most responsible and cost-effective way.

If you represent a business with opportunities related to EPR, waste management or other environmental matters in Latin America, Valoryza is available to help.

Contact:

Rodrigo Leiva Neumann
General Manager
+56 9 72143053

Rodrigo.leiva@valoryza.com

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – TIC Mattress Recycling

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:33 pm, June 2nd, 2016Comments0

TIC Mattress Recycling employs world’s best practice to provide sustainable end-of-life mattress recycling. TIC services local governments and mattress retailers to provide high levels of resource recovery.

The company commenced operations in 2013 and has built Australia’s first automated mattress deconstruction facility based on European technology that it has developed further and is now marketing globally.

TIC’s processes ensure maximum resource recovery and environmental controls while minimizing handling and exposure to safety risks.

The company is working closely with mattress manufacturers, retailers, local government and other stakeholders to develop a mattress product stewardship program for Australia. TIC is committed to working with others to establish a mattress stewardship program that shifts costs from local government, encourages innovation, increases resource recovery and is transparent and accountable.

In an industry that has been dogged by poor practices, low resource recovery and boom and bust cycles, TIC Mattress Recycling heralds a new era of advanced and sustainable mattress recycling.

TIC Mattress Recycling is part of the TIC Group. Further details can be found here.

 

GlobalPSC Member – Equilibrium

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:43 am, February 29th, 2016Comments2

Equilibrium is a sustainability strategy and consulting company. It provides environmental solutions that cut costs, align organisational goals and enhance reputation. From environmental management systems to technical assessments to strategic advice, Equilibrium’s expertise and experience extends across many sectors of the economy including food manufacturing, stadiums and events, Government, waste management, recycling, agriculture, packaging and facilities management.

Equilibrium has worked extensively in policy and regulatory development, especially in waste and materials efficiency and including product stewardship across a range of schemes and materials. To find out more, visit here.

 

Annual General Meeting and Call for Office-holders and other Executive Committee Positions

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:13 pm, December 10th, 2015Comments0

The Global Product Stewardship Council is holding its Annual General Meeting via webconference at 0700 Eastern Standard Time in Australia on Wednesday, 16 December 2015. Due to time zone differences, this equates to the following:

  • 2000 on Tuesday, 15 December in London
  • 1500 on Tuesday, 15 December in Boston
  • 1400 on Tuesday, 15 December in Minneapolis
  • 1200 on Tuesday, 15 December in Vancouver

Email admin@globalpsc.net to register for participation in the AGM. While multiple representatives of member organisations are welcome to participate in the AGM, each organisation is entitled to one vote only. Participation details will be emailed to you once registered.

Items to be addressed during the AGM include:

  • President’s report on GlobalPSC activities during the last preceding financial year
  • Member feedback / Q&A on GlobalPSC member services
  • Financial statement
  • Election of office-holders and other Executive Committee Positions

 

Call for Office-holders and other Executive Committee Positions

In accordance with the Rules of the Global Product Stewardship Council, nominations for office-holders and other Executive Committee positions are now open. Only paid-up full GlobalPSC members may nominate a candidate, or be nominated as a candidate.

The term of office of all currently elected GlobalPSC officers and Executive Committee members will expire at the conclusion of the AGM.  Nominations are called for the following positions (current office-holders are listed), to be in effect for one year:

The Executive Committee currently comprises the office-holders plus David Lawes, Kylie Hughes, Scott Cassel, Garth Hickle and Ed Cordner. With the exception of Neil Hastie, whose service is greatly appreciated, all current office-holders and Executive Committee members have opted to run for re-election, as allowed under GlobalPSC Rules.

Nominations for office-holders and committee members must be made in writing, signed by 2 members of the GlobalPSC and accompanied by the written consent of the candidate. Candidates will be required to provide a recent high-resolution digital photograph and a statement of no more than 100 words in support of their candidature.

Nominations should be emailed to russ@globalpsc.net by 14 December 2015.

 

Approval for Voluntary National Australian Paint Product Stewardship Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:04 pm, October 29th, 2015Comments1

A voluntary national product stewardship scheme today received regulatory approval for an A$0.15/litre levy to be applied to the sale of new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.

Levy revenue will fund the not-for-profit company Paint Stewardship Ltd to administer all aspects of the collection scheme, including education, marketing and communication, R&D investment, transport and processing of waste paint from trade and domestic sources across the country. The scheme is expected to commence in May 2016.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (the ACCC) today approved the application for authorisation lodged by the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, Paint Stewardship Limited and certain paint manufacturers and wholesalers on 1 July 2015. The ACCC approval of the levy extends through 1 June 2021.

The National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the ACCC for approval of the levy.

The GlobalPSC and several of our members have helped facilitate development of the scheme since Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister’s June 2013 nomination of paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011.

In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents, including today’s determination and rationale for the decision, are available under the Paint category on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

Guest Blog – Dutch Sustainability Plans for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:24 pm, August 13th, 2015Comments2

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Gill Bevington, Policy Analyst, Packaging for Perchards.

 

 

The packaging sustainability institute, KIDV, KIDV has published an overview in English about the progress of the sustainability plans which industry undertook to develop as part of its commitments in the Framework Agreement on Packaging.

KIDV reports that sectoral sustainability plans covering 80% of the weight of packaging on the market have now been submitted. This first set of plans sets out objectives and measures to achieve them by 2018 and further plans will be developed with objectives for 2022.

Since the Framework Agreement was signed, the Packaging Decree has been revised. The revised Decree, which was adopted in 2014, gives the Minister powers to impose statutory sustainability requirements on packaging. These new powers are seen as fall back powers if the plans now being developed do not deliver the results the Dutch authorities are hoping for. It is important therefore that Dutch industry supports and implements the plans.

KIDV’s methodology for the plans is to identify the front runners in each sector, and then aim to bring all companies in that sector up to the same level. Targets for the sector are based on the best in class. The plans were assessed by an independent review committee established by KIDV and consisting of four experts from different universities.

As KIDV’s approach was innovative, it was challenging to get the sectors involved in the development of the plans. Some showed reluctance at first, comments KIDV, but because the approach was unfamiliar, not through lack of interest. KIDV warns that the process will take time, depending on the level of investment needed to implement the plans and because the scientific knowledge needed to set targets was not available in all cases.

Each sectoral plan sets out the measures to be taken by producers in order to increase the sustainability of product-pack combinations within their sector, both measures to be taken by 2018 and then by 2022. Each sector is responsible for implementing its plan. The focus is currently on the product-pack combinations with the greatest potential environmental benefit.

The first plans to be developed cover the fruit and vegetables, food (including animal feed) and e-commerce sectors. A sub-plan for rPET 2018-2022 has been submitted by the Dutch association for soft drinks, waters and juices.

The main focus of the first plans to be submitted is:

  • greater use of sustainably managed and certified raw materials, such as FSC;
  • increase in the proportion of secondary raw materials in packaging, such as in plastic bottles and pots, tubs and trays (PTT)s;
  • decrease in the quantity of materials used, through optimisation and source reduction;
  • increasing the recyclability of packaging, through the use of mono-materials;
  • use of recycling logos on packaging to enable consumers to sort their packaging better.

There is nothing new about policy-makers encouraging producers to improve the environmental performance of their packaging. Industry bodies throughout Europe have for years published good practice examples of optimised packaging, including source reduction, improved recyclability etc, which aim both to encourage other producers and to demonstrate to policy-makers the efforts being made.

It has always been up to each producer to decide whether and how to optimise its packaging. Even in countries like Belgium and Spain, where producers have to submit prevention plans to the authorities, the producers set their own targets in their plans. But the new Dutch approach is different – it seeks to identify which are the best product-pack combinations in a sector under different headings and then to bring all producers in that sector up to that standard. With the threat of legislation if the plans do not yield as much as expected, sectoral trade associations will be working hard to encourage their members to participate in the process.

But it raises some questions:

  • What happens if the front runner is in that enviable position because of a unique set of circumstances which other producers in the sector cannot emulate?
  • How much pressure will individual companies be under to improve their sustainability in order to meet the targets in the plan? There may be sound reasons why a producer cannot match the best in class. Plans are being implemented by the sectors so individual companies will be judged by their peers (competitors) who will understand the constraints. But if it looks as though the objectives in a plan will not be met, which could have implications for all producers in the sector, what then?
  • What about imported products, for which the importer will have to persuade its foreign suppliers to make the necessary changes? That might not be possible or desirable because of the longer transport distances and/or because the preferred packaging type is not available in the country of production. Individual Dutch importers are of course free to set their own product/packaging specifications, but if those specifications are set out in a formal plan, could they represent a barrier to trade to suppliers in other EU member states?
  • Could there be problems with commercial confidentiality? Some front runners may be happy to be named and to provide information about their packaging. But others may prefer to keep the data confidential because their optimised packaging helps to give them their competitive edge. And will the laggards be named and shamed, even if there are sound reasons why they cannot match the best in class?

What happens if the results in 2018 are not as good as expected, even if the sectors have worked hard to improve the sustainability of their packaging? How will Dutch policy-makers respond? Will they acknowledge that the achievements are as good as they possibly can be and that, using the methodology, performance will continue to improve in future? Or will they conclude that this “voluntary” action is insufficient and that legislation is necessary? It remains to be seen whether this new Dutch approach is just rhetoric or whether it will deliver real improvements.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

Gill Bevington joined Perchards in 1991 and currently serves as Policy Analyst, Packaging. She monitors, analyses and reports on European legislative developments on packaging (and industry response to them) at national and EU level, and is an expert on national packaging waste management initiatives across Europe. Gill has carried out many tailor-made studies for clients on aspects of the packaging legislation in place in various European countries and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject. 

 

Celebrating Five Years of Industry-led Electronics Recycling in Prince Edward Island

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:26 pm, August 3rd, 2015Comments1

The Electronic Products Recycling Association (EPRA) recently celebrated five years of coverage on Canada’s Prince Edward Island (PEI).

In that five years, EPRA has collected and recycled more than 3,000 metric tonnes of unwanted electronics in the province. “That’s approximately 465,000 TVs, computers, printers and a myriad of other electronic devices diverted from landfill and illegal export,” said Cliff Hacking, President and CEO of EPRA. “Not only are these products being recycled responsibly, but they also yield a host of valuable materials such as steel, copper, silver, palladium and glass that is put back into the manufacturing supply chain,” said Hacking.

L-R: Gerard MacLellan, Executive Director of EPRA Atlantic Canada; Cliff Hacking – President and CEO of EPRA; The Hon Robert Mitchell, Minister of Communities, Land and Environment (PEI); Gerry Moore, CEO of Island Waste Management

EPRA is a not-for-profit, industry-led organisation that works in partnership with manufacturers, retailers, municipal governments and consumers to ensure end-of-life electronics are diverted from landfills and recycled in an efficient and environmentally responsible manner. “It’s a strong partnership model that’s seen success here in Prince Edward Island and across the country,” said Hacking.

This view was supported by Minister Mitchell, saying “Islanders can and should be proud of what’s been achieved here over the last five years” and “(t)his level of commitment to responsibly recycling electronics is a true reflection of their belief in being responsible stewards of our beautiful province.”
 The Minister commended EPRA PEI and more than 300 participating retailers, manufacturers, distributors and suppliers of regulated electronics in the province for making the program a success.

EPRA’s success in PEI is attributed primarily to 80% program awareness in the province and to convenient access to collection depots, with 99% of the population within 30 kilometres of an EPRA drop-off depot.

 

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