Posts Tagged ‘Responsible Recycling’

GlobalPSC Launches Key Themes to be Explored with Members

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:39 pm, March 25th, 2014Comments2

Singapore – The Global Product Stewardship Council today announced a series of themes to enable decision makers to more effectively draw upon international experience in product stewardship policy and to help raise the standards of recycling programs globally.

The roundtable discussions, hosted jointly by the GlobalPSC and Infoactiv at the Shangri-La Hotel Singapore, addressed a broad range of chemicals and products amongst key stakeholders including BASF, HP, Apple, Shell and CropLife Asia.

GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin provided a global overview of product stewardship and extended producer responsibility programs then launched the themes being examined by the GlobalPSC, which include:

  • Making meaningful comparisons between programs (especially for recycling rates and key performance measures)
  • The importance of responsible recycling
  • The future of product stewardship
  • Competition amongst producer responsibility organisations and service providers

The GlobalPSC will be refining and prioritising the themes in consultation with GlobalPSC members and sharing results through a variety of approaches. These efforts will be assisted by product stewardship expert Marra Teasdale from her base in Singapore.

The Singapore roundtable was facilitated by Chris Mason and John Gertsakis from Infoactiv, and covered a range of key issues across the product life-cycle from Design for Environment and Cleaner Production through to product use and end-of-life management. Infoactiv’s focus during discussions was to explore the critical importance of regional priorities and cultural sensitivity given the diversity of countries and issues across the Asia Pacific region. The roundtable highlighted that the definition and application of Product Stewardship and EPR can vary dramatically mindful of context, culture and environmental priorities.

Guest Blog – Responsible Recycling for Electronics Sees Major Gains

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:51 am, March 14th, 2014Comments7

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Clare Lindsay, Board Member of R2 Solutions and former Senior Policy Advisor and Project Director for Product Stewardship in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The digital revolution has led to unprecedented changes in the way we work, communicate and live our lives. However, this breakneck pace of technological advancement over the past several decades has produced an unintended side-effect: a rapidly increasing volume of used electronics.

The world’s 7 billion people now generate an average of 15 pounds of used electronics per person, per year, with that amount expected to increase over 33% by the end of the decade. Developed nations, such as the United States, are leaders in discarding used electronics, but many emerging economies, such as Brazil, India and China, are rapidly eclipsing many other nations. In fact, based on the most recent numbers from an organization sponsored by United Nations University, Solving the E-waste Problem (StEP), China now generates more discarded electronics per year than the United States, making it the world leader.

Many electronic items can be repaired and reused in second hand markets in the developed or developing world. Additionally, almost all electronics are recyclable, containing valuable metals and plastics that when separated can be resold as useful commodities. Unfortunately, many electronics are not recycled, instead finding their way into landfills or other disposal channels where rudimentary practices can cause serious human health and environmental harm.

In response to these challenges, a coalition of stakeholders including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electronics manufacturers, major retailers, NGOs, electronics refurbishers and recyclers, and others, created the Responsible Recycling (R2) standard for safe, environmentally sustainable management of used electronics. Developed through a transparent, consensus-based process, the goal of the R2 standard was to develop a voluntary, market-based mechanism for expanding and encouraging the use of best practices for electronics refurbishing and recycling.

Responsible electronics recycling practices ensure that used electronics are handled in a way that encourages repair and reuse, safely reclaims metals, plastics and other materials for commodity resale, and guards against human health issues and environmental contamination brought on by improper recovery and disposal. R2 certification has been integral to the growth of responsible recycling worldwide and new changes to the standard aim to take these principles even further.

The R2 standard begins 2014 with incredible momentum. Over 500 facilities in 14 countries are now R2 certified with more becoming certified every week. Last July’s release of R2:2013, the first major update to the original R2 standard, added increased record keeping and reporting requirements, mandated certification to generally-accepted environmental health and safety requirements, and tightened requirements regarding how facilities that refurbish and recycle electronics address some of the most pressing environmental and human health risks associated with managing used electronics.

The R2:2013 standard specifically addresses these challenges:

  • Reuse and refurbishment – Refurbishment and reuse is considered, in most instances, the greenest way to manage used electronics, offering a second (or third) chance to use an item before it is disposed. R2:2013 adopts a hierarchy for managing equipment that prioritizes reuse and refurbishment. Certified recyclers are required to take all practical steps to divert tested and working electronics to repair and resale channels. This requires the use of rigorous testing procedures, sanitizing data, labeling and sorting equipment based on condition, and properly packing equipment for transport.
  • Data security – Data security breaches risk billions of dollars in liabilities and losses each year, with unauthorized access to used devices among the leading causes of data security incidents. R2:2013 certified recyclers are required to sanitize or destroy data to NIST 800-88, ADISA, or NAID specifications, document their processes, and keep appropriate records. Additionally, certified recyclers are required to implement training procedures for their employees and submit to periodic review by independent auditors of their data security practices.
  • Environmental health and safety – Electronic devices can contain lead, mercury, cadmium, and other potentially toxic materials. If not managed correctly, these materials can contaminate soil and water supplies, or adversely affect the health of workers in recycling facilities or people in surrounding communities. R2:2013 requires that certified recycling facilities have a written environmental health and safety management plan, as well as implement and regularly test workplace safety and environmental controls. Additionally, facilities are required to implement a quality assurance plan and policy, and be certified to either RIOS (a recycling specific health and safety standard for electronics recyclers) or both ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001.

The enhanced standard also provides a foundation for many exciting new programs and services that will benefit recyclers and improve the operating environment for electronics recycling. R2 Solutions has hired a Director of Quality to work with recyclers and refurbishers, and auditors, to better understand and implement the requirements of R2:2013. In addition, R2 Solutions will be doing to more to improve how certifying bodies conduct and follow up on the audits required for recyclers to obtain and retain their R2 certification. R2 Solutions is working to develop new support tools for recyclers and auditors that it will be rolling out over the coming months.

This is an important time for R2 certification and more broadly, sustainable electronics recycling. Over the course of the next year, the over 500 companies currently R2 certified will upgrade to the new R2:2013 standard. As of the end of January 2014, several trailblazing facilities have already successfully upgraded to R2:2013. R2 Solutions is excited about the continuing growth and development of the R2 standard and is looking forward to further expanding the reach of the standard to electronic refurbishing and recycling facilities around the world.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council.

Clare Lindsay recently retired from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC, after a 20 year career focused on resource conservation and materials management.  As Senior Policy Advisor and Project Director for Product Stewardship in EPAs Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery, Ms. Lindsay led EPAs efforts to initiate the first national dialogue in the United States on electronics product stewardship and takeback. This initiative catalyzed and informed action by numerous states that have since enacted electronics takeback laws.  Ms. Lindsay also advised and helped develop many other stewardship initiatives addressing packaging, carpet, office furniture, and paint.

Currently, Ms. Lindsay serves on the Board of R2 Solutions. She is also Chairman of the Board of the National Center for Electronics Recycling, a non-profit organization dedicated to the development and enhancement of a national infrastructure for the management of used electronics in the United States.

GlobalPSC Member – Sustainable Electronics Recycling International (SERI)

Posted by GlobalPSC at 11:20 am, March 7th, 2014Comments13

SERI image003

Many electronic items can be repaired and reused in second hand markets in the developed or developing world. Additionally, almost all electronics are recyclable, containing valuable metals and plastics that when separated can be resold as useful commodities. Unfortunately, many electronics are not recycled, instead finding their way into landfills or other disposal channels where rudimentary practices can cause serious human health and environmental harm.

In response to these challenges, a coalition of stakeholders including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electronics manufacturers, major retailers, NGOs, electronics refurbishers and recyclers, and others, created the Responsible Recycling (R2) standard for safe, environmentally sustainable management of used electronics. Developed through a transparent, consensus-based process, the goal of the R2 standard was to develop a voluntary, market-based mechanism for expanding and encouraging the use of best practices for electronics refurbishing and recycling.

Responsible electronics recycling practices ensure that used electronics are handled in a way that encourages repair and reuse, safely reclaims metals, plastics and other materials for commodity resale, and guards against human health issues and environmental contamination brought on by improper recovery and disposal. R2 certification has been integral to the growth of responsible recycling worldwide and new changes to the standard aim to take these principles even further.

The R2 standard begins 2014 with incredible momentum. Over 500 facilities in 14 countries are now R2 certified with more becoming certified every week. Last July’s release of R2:2013, the first major update to the original R2 standard, added increased record keeping and reporting requirements, mandated certification to generally-accepted environmental health and safety requirements, and tightened requirements regarding how facilities that refurbish and recycle electronics address some of the most pressing environmental and human health risks associated with managing used electronics.

On 5 June 2014, R2 Solutions announced that a new organisation, Sustainable Electronics Recycling International (SERI), would succeed R2 Solutions in developing and promoting the R2 Standard.

Up To 42,000 Jobs Could be Created in the US through Domestic E-Waste Recycling

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:20 pm, February 6th, 2013Comments0

 

 

 

 

 

A recent study has estimated that 42,000 direct and indirect jobs could be created with increased electronics recycling in the US, in addition to generating an extra US$1 billion payroll.

The Coalition for American Electronics Recycling (CAER) contracted DSM Environmental Services, Inc. (DSM) to estimate the number of jobs associated with e-waste recycling in the US, and to project how many jobs might be created with increased domestic e-waste recycling.

The report highlights the uncertainties around just how much of the electronics scrap collected in the US is actually processed domestically as opposed to being exported for processing. Despite the uncertainties, DSM found the processing e-waste in the US instead of exporting it to developing countries would create 21,000 full-time equivalent recycling jobs with a corresponding payroll of US$772 million, with the potential to create another 21,000 indirect jobs and their associated economic activity.

New GlobalPSC Corporate Member – ARCOA

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:28 pm, January 4th, 2013Comments1

 

 

 

 

ARCOA has become one of the latest multinational Corporate Members of the Global Product Stewardship Council.

ARCOA is an ISO14001 and R2 certified recycler of electronics. Services provided to customers include Compliance and Risk Management, Asset Management, Investment Recovery and Technology Recycling. Under the umbrella of holding company the ARCOA Group, ARCOA operates facilities in the United States, Chile, Hong Kong and China.

ARCOA is committed to environmental sustainability through comprehensive programs of remarketing, de-manufacturing, component recovery, recycling and refining of used and end of life electronics.

ARCOA is committed to a sustainable future and to offering services that are socially responsible and to conduct business in an ethical manner. ARCOA’s ethics and social responsibility are built around the recognition that everything done in connection with their work is measured against the highest possible standards.

R2 recyclers adhere to stringent environmental, health, safety and security requirements and ensure that toxic material streams are managed safely, responsibly, and legally by downstream vendors – all the way to final disposition. ARCOA earned ISO 14001 certification in 2011. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is the world’s largest developer and publisher of international standards.

George Hinkle, President and Founder of ARCOA, was recently invited to Washington DC by the American Chemical Society to brief Congressional staffers on the benefits of recycling electronics. George’s presentation and several others are available here.

Select Proceedings from Electronics Recycling Asia in Guangzhou, China

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:23 pm, November 27th, 2012Comments0

 

 

 

 

In November 2012, the Global Product Stewardship Council attended the Electronics Recycling Asia event in Guangzhou, China. Select presentations from the event have been posted on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members, with the consent of the presenters.

The presentations posted include (in no particular order):

  • The Principles of Proper Regulation by Crystynna Ewe of Dell in Singapore
  • Sustaining Electronics Recycling Globally: Key Ingredients to a Successful Market by Robin K. Wiener of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc. in the US
  • How does Taiwan Recycle Electronics Waste? by Prof. Hsiao-Kang Ma of the National Taiwan University Department of Mechanical Engineering in Taiwan
  • Rare Earth Recovery from Urban Mines: Recycling of Luminescent Powder from Fluorescent Lamps by Thomas Langer of OSRAM AG in Germany
  • European WEEE Recycling Standard – What will the EU WEEELABEX Standard Require of Global Recyclers? by Julie-Ann Adams of Really Green Credentials Ltd in the United Kingdom
  • Development of Total Recycling Technologies for Flat Panel Display Devices by Dr Hyun Seon Hong, of the Institute for Advanced Engineering in Korea
  • Electronic Product Stewardship in Australia and New Zealand by Russ Martin of the GlobalPSC

GlobalPSC members can log in to the Knowledge Base via the Members tab at www.globalpsc.net.

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – Call2Recycle

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:34 am, August 31st, 2012Comments18

 

 

 

Call2Recycle is the only no cost rechargeable battery and cellphone collection program in North America. Since 1996, Call2Recycle has diverted over 100 million pounds (45 million kilograms) of batteries from the solid waste stream and established a network of 30,000 collection sites throughout the U.S. and Canada. Advancing green business practices and environmental sustainability, Call2Recycle is the most active voice promoting eco-safe reclamation and recycling of rechargeable batteries and cellphones. It is the first program of its kind to receive the Responsible Recycling Practices Standard (R2) certification, as well as e-Steward recognition from the Basel Action Network (BAN).  Founded in 1994, Call2Recycle is operated by the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC), a non-profit organization funded by product manufacturers across the globe committed to environmentally-sound recycling of rechargeable batteries and cellphones. These manufacturers place the RBRC recycling seal on their rechargeable products and batteries, informing users that they are recyclable.

CEO and President Carl Smith serves as Treasurer of the GlobalPSC.

 

 

Call2Recycle Receives R2 Certification

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:35 am, April 4th, 2012Comments0

Global Product Stewardship Council member Call2Recycle operates over 30,000 collection point for batteries and mobile / cell phones in North America. Call2Recycle has announced that it is the first program of its kind to receive the Responsible Recycling Practices Standard (R2) certification relating to environmental and public health, worker health and safety, security aspects of electronics recycling, and the management of the collection and distribution of batteries and mobile / cell phones to downstream processors for recycling. A media release regarding the announcement of R2 certification is available here.

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – TES-AMM Australia New Zealand

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:30 am, February 22nd, 2012Comments15

 

 

 

 

 

 

TES-AMM Australia and New Zealand are part of the TES-Envirocorp group, a specialised electronic waste management organisation with core activities in:

  • Electronic Asset Management and Disposal Programs
  • Secure Data Destruction to US Dept of Defence Standards
  • Value Optimization for Used Electronic Equipment and Parts and Microsoft Approved Refurbisher
  • Recovery of Precious Metals from Electronic Waste
  • Recycling of Batteries (most chemistries)
  • Printer Consumables Recycling
  • Recycling of Epoxy and other Waste Plastic
  • Forward and Reverse Logistics Solutions
  • Project or Program Management

TES-AMM’s recycling operations span nearly 30 locations globally and are certified to international standards JAS-ANZ ISO9001, ISO14001, OHSAS18001 and R2 (Responsible Recycler). In Australia and New Zealand, TES-AMM has also been assessed to comply with DR AS/NZ 5377 interim standards for the collection, transport and recycling of end of life televisions and computers.

Because TES-AMM offers transparency and accountability in what they do, TES-AMM has become the strategic recycling vendor for many well-known Information and Communications Technology (ICT) companies and product stewardship organisations in the Asia Pacific and throughout other parts of the world. Coupled with TES-AMM’s “one stop shop” approach underpinned by compliance to local and international regulations and best practice standards, TES-AMM has a proven record of achieving environmentally beneficial outcomes, economies and service levels that meet or exceed the expectations of their clients.

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