Posts Tagged ‘Stakeholder’

Ontario Seeks Input on Future Direction for WEEE/E-scrap

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:20 pm, January 15th, 2014Comments1

Waste Diversion Ontario (WDO) has reported in a recent program update  that the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Program operated by Ontario Electronic Stewardship has collected more than 230,000 tonnes of WEEE since the program began in April 2009. WDO is seeking input on key areas identified for improvement by stakeholders, including targets and metrics; harmonization; recycling standards; the WEEE market outside of the program; program communications; and reuse.

Encorp Pacific Requests Feedback on Beverage Container Stewardship Plan

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:44 am, April 18th, 2013Comments1

 Encorp Pacific (Canada) was originally formed in 1994 and appointed by beverage brand owners as the not-for-profit product stewardship corporation responsible for all beverage containers and all alcohol beverage containers (except for aluminum beer cans and refillable beer bottles).

Since its inception, Encorp has fulfilled the requirements of the British Columbia Recycling Regulation. This regulation calls for the submission of a revised plan every five years.

Stakeholders are invited to review the plan online or download the PDF and submit feedback anytime until July 2, 2013. The plan will also be available for review at the following public meetings:

April 18, 2013  1:00pm – 3:00pm  Bear Mountain Resort (1999 Country Club Way, Victoria)

April 23  1:00pm – 3:00pm  Coast Capri Hotel (1171 Harvey Avenue, Kelowna)

May 10   1:00pm – 3:00pm  BCIT Downtown Campus, (555 Seymour Street, Room 282/284)

May 24   1:00pm – 3:00pm  The Westin Resort & Spa (4090 Whistler Way, Whistler)

June 4    1:00pm – 3:00pm  Sandman Signature Hotel (2990 Recplace Dr Prince George)

June 12  1:00pm – 3:00pm  Prestige, Rocky Mountain Resort (209 Van Horne St S, Cranbrook)

To register online for any one of the above-noted sessions, click here.

Encorp Pacific is a long-standing Corporate Member of the Global Product Stewardship Council and Encorp’s President & CEO Neil Hastie serves on the GlobalPSC Executive Committee.

Strong GlobalPSC Representation on Australia’s New Product Stewardship Advisory Group

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:54 pm, December 6th, 2012Comments2

Senator the Hon Don Farrell, Australia’s Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, today announced the establishment of a Product Stewardship Advisory Group to provide independent advice to the government on products that could be considered for attention under the Product Stewardship Act.

The group’s Chair and nine members have been appointed to three-year terms. Three of the members are active Global Product Stewardship Council members and active contributors to the GlobalPSC’s activities. These include:

Senator Farrell’s media release announcing the Product Stewardship Advisory Group and its composition is available here.

GlobalPSC Member Profile – Product Stewardship Institute

Posted by GlobalPSC at 2:47 pm, August 13th, 2012Comments16

The Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) is a national, membership-based nonprofit committed to reducing the health, safety, and environmental impacts of consumer products across their lifecycle—with a strong focus on sustainable end-of-life management. With experience in nearly 20 product categories, PSI brings together stakeholders with varying interests to develop product stewardship solutions in a collaborative manner, facilitating multi-stakeholder dialogues, encouraging product design changes, and advocating for producer responsibility.

PSI has 47 state environmental agency members and hundreds of local government members, along with over 100 corporate, business, academic, non-U.S. government, and organizational partners. Together, they achieve their product stewardship goals by designing, implementing, evaluating, strengthening, and promoting both legislative and voluntary product stewardship initiatives across North America.

PSI strives to achieve the following financial, social, and environmental goals with every initiative it undertakes:

  • Minimize waste management costs, particularly for taxpayers and government agencies;
  • Create recycling and waste management jobs in safe, fair trade conditions; and
  • Reduce waste, increase product reuse, and boost recycling rates while minimizing greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption, and the use of toxic chemicals.

 

GlobalPSC, SV and ABRI Facilitating Battery Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:46 am, August 7th, 2012Comments4

 

 

 

 

 

The Global Product Stewardship Council is pleased to announce that we are working with one of our longest-standing government members, Sustainability Victoria (SV), and the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) to facilitate battery product stewardship in Australia.

Sustainability Victoria’s BatteryBack program has been running for the last 5 years and has collected and processed over 6.7 tonnes of domestic batteries. However, 4.6 tonnes has been collected in the last 2 years, indicating more than just steady growth. It is SV’s intention to grow the collection system to increase the access for Victorians to drop off their spent batteries to be processed responsibility and develop the business case to reduce cost.

The GlobalPSC is assisting SV and ABRI through research, facilitation of stakeholder discussions, insight on lessons learned from overseas programs and developing the public policy and business case for battery product stewardship. The first step is initial stakeholder discussions, with an aim to developing a strategic plan to address domestic battery stewardship over the next three years.

Batteries hold special significance for the GlobalPSC. We led a European study tour that included industry-led battery product stewardship programs in Belgium and Switzerland (referred to as BEBAT and INOBAT, respectively). Several GlobalPSC corporate members, Call2Recycle, Raw Materials Company Inc., MobileMuster and TES-AMM Australia New Zealand operate programs that collect and recycle various batteries. One of our government members, the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, has also implemented product stewardship for batteries.

Reinventing Recycling in the U.S.: The Business Case for an Extended Producer Responsibility Model

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:06 pm, July 18th, 2012Comments1

The Global Product Stewardship Council will periodically invite thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our first guest blogger is Michael Washburn, Director of Sustainability at Nestlé Waters North America.

Annual U.S. recycling rates have stagnated at an unacceptable—and unsustainable—33%.[1] Every year, valuable resources continue to pile up in landfills, logistics costs continue to rise and government recycling programs face deeper fiscal insecurities. Intensified by today’s uncertain economic climate—not to mention the growing effects of climate change—it has become increasingly clear that recycling in the U.S. needs to be reinvented.

At Nestlé Waters North America, the country’s third largest beverage company, we are committed to advancing recycling policies to capture and reuse every beverage container produced. As a packaged goods company, driving a long-term recycling solution is our social and environmental responsibility. It also serves our business interests.

Recycling epitomizes the triple bottom line of “people, profit, planet” and is the cornerstone of a sustainable society. It reduces litter in our communities, saves businesses and organizations money by cutting back on energy and raw material costs, and protects the planet by conserving natural resources and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It also drives economic growth. For example, a recent recycling study shows that if the U.S. could increase its recycling rate to 75% by 2030, it would create 1.5 million additional jobs. All we need is a way to get from 33% to 75%.

We believe we can get there with Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) for packaging and printed paper, a model that brings the financial responsibility of recycling to industry, increasing access to curbside recycling and recycling away from home, not just for bottles, but for all product packaging. Designed using private sector efficiencies, an EPR model would increase recycling rates, lower municipal spending on recycling and ultimately, reward taxpayers with fewer costs, smaller government and a more effective recycling system in their communities. Further, EPR promises packaged goods companies increasingly reliable access to recycled materials, so we are able to produce the more sustainable products our consumers increasingly want and expect from us.

To be successful, EPR demands collaboration with a broad range of stakeholder groups, including brand owners, trade associations, private haulers, municipalities, state legislatures, environmental NGOs, retailers and more. One stakeholder group we’ve been working deeply with is Recycling Reinvented, a new nonprofit committed to increasing recycling rates in the U.S. through EPR. We also participate in a dialogue process facilitated by Future 500, a nonprofit that bridges corporations and sustainability advocates, which has brought together more than 30 organizations to talk about the best attributes of an EPR model in the United States , and how to craft and successfully pass state-level legislation. We hope to move legislation in key states in 2013.

Business success today requires constant innovation to meet 21st century sustainability challenges. By collaborating with environmental advocates, industry partners and policymakers through an EPR model, we can increase U.S. recycling rates, provide supply chain stability and sustainability and create millions of green jobs. EPR can work—we’ve seen it demonstrated in Europe and helped pilot it in Canada. The time has come to band together to make it work in the U.S.

 

Michael Washburn is the Director of Sustainability at Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA). His primary focus is working with a coalition of recycling stakeholders to advance Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) for packaging and printed paper in the United States. Michael’s work also includes building NWNA’s efforts towards innovation in energy usage and building design across its manufacturing facilities, encouraging constructive water policy initiatives and engaging with stakeholders about the environmental efforts of NWNA. Prior to NWNA, Michael held a senior position at The Wilderness Society and was Vice President of Brand Management at the Forest Stewardship Council-US. Michael holds a Ph.D. in forest policy from Penn State University and has served as an advisor to the USDA Forest Service on sustainability issues.  Michael serves on several nonprofit boards of directors and devotes significant time and energy to the fields of workplace giving and disability advocacy. 

[1] EcoWatch (May 29, 2012). Recycling Reinvented—Working with Top U.S. Industry Leaders to Bring EPR to the U.S. EcoWatch. Retrieved June 19, 2012.

Update on Australia’s Framework Legislation and TV / Computer Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:20 pm, August 31st, 2011Comments0

The GlobalPSC was appointed to a Stakeholder Reference Group for Australia’s product stewardship framework legislation. A recent SRG presentation explains the legislation and proposed regulations for TVs and computers. The Australian Government authorised release to GlobalPSC members, so we have posted the presentation on the Knowledge Base available to members.

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9489 8851
Fax: +61 2 9489 8553
Email: info@globalpsc.net