Posts Tagged ‘waste electrical and electronic equipment’

Implementation of 2018 Open Scope WEEE

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:16 pm, April 30th, 2018Comments0

 

 

The EU WEEE Directive (Directive 2012/19/EU) introduced a number of changes to the original Directive (Directive 2002/96/EC), including an “Open Scope” of 6 revised categories instead of the previous 10, which according to the Directive are to be introduced from 15 August 2018. The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive, which was made an EU law in February 2003, was instituted to set collection, recycling and recovery targets for electrical goods. The Directive sets the foundations for the creation of collection/compliance schemes. The aim of the schemes is to ensure waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is collected and reused or recycled.

The six new categories to be introduced are:

1. Temperature exchange equipment: fridges, freezers, air conditioning, etc.

2. Screens, monitors, and equipment containing screens having a surface greater than 100 cm2: TVs, computer monitors, etc.

3. Lamps

4. Large equipment (any external dimension more than 50cm): washing machines, dish washers, cookers, luminaires, large printers, copying equipment in general, etc.

5. Small equipment (no external dimension more than 50cm): vacuum cleaners, calculators, video cameras, cameras, hifi equipment, watches and clocks, smoke detectors, payment systems, etc.

6. Small IT and telecommunication equipment (no external dimension more than 50 cm): mobile phones, tablets, routers, laptops, GPS, printers, etc.

Although the revised scope comes into effect in August this year, Member States and compliance schemes have reported a range of implementation dates for the Open Scope categories. For example, the Finish WEEE scheme, Elker Oy, has introduced the new categories starting 1 January this year. The scheme said in a press release that all the subcategories previously in use will be found in one of the new six categories. Also, B2B and B2C equipment will be placed in new equipment categories. B2C categories are covered by all those listed above and the B2B equipment is under categories 1, 4 and 5 of the new open scope.

On the other end of the scale, Recupel, the Belgium WEEE scheme, release annually their new categories and fees which are valid from 1 July each year. This year and next there is no difference, hence the Open Scope categories have not been introduced from 1 July this year. The scheme has confirmed with us that as usual, there will be no further fee or category changes until 1 July 2019, almost a year after implementation of the 2018 WEEE Open Scope categories.

In the UK, the 2013 WEEE Regulations fully transposed the requirements of the EU WEEE Directive, therefore will include changing the UK’s 14 categories to 6, which according to DEFRA will be from 1 January 2019.  Defra opened a consultation on the ‘open scope’ as they wanted to hear people’s view on 2013 WEEE Regulations, specifically whether they improved the environment as a proportionate cost to business. The consultation proposed three options for the implementation of the Open Scope:

Option 1

The first option involves making no amendments and hence allowing the WEEE Regulations to take effect, with the requirement to categorise and report in 6 revised categories from 1 January 2019. The new categories would be: 1 Temperature Exchange Equipment; 2 Screens, Monitors & Equipment Containing Screens Surface are >100 cm2; 3 Lamps; 4 Large Equipment Any External Dimension > 50 cm; and 6 Small IT & Telecom No External Dimension > 50 cm. This would require changes to how producers and Approved Authorised Treatment Facilities (AATFs) report. Furthermore, there would be a significant redistribution of costs, with some producers paying significantly more and others making savings.

​Option 2

The second option involves making amendments to the 2013 WEEE Regulations to retain the UK’s current 14 categories and to allocate any EEE previously out of scope to one of the existing categories. This would avoid redistribution of costs and is the government’s preferred option.

Option 3

The final option would adopt the 6 revised categories but introduce 3 subcategories in order to reduce the change in costs to producers. This would mean that more costly or hazardous WEEE treatment is fairly allocated to producers who place it on the market as they would have to report in the relevant subcategories. Hence increased costs will be imposed on some producers, and savings for others as well as changes to the reporting system for both producers and AATFs. Two subcategories would come under ‘Temperature Exchange Equipment’ which would be: 1 Those containing refrigerant and 2 Those not containing refrigerant. A further three subcategories would come under ‘Large Equipment Any External Dimension > 50 cm’ which would be: 5 PV, 6 Large household equipment (LDA) and 7 All other.

An announcement on changes to the UK WEEE scoping is expected in May. ​​​

Elsewhere, the new Open Scope categories are planned to be implemented on 15 August this year in Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy and Romania. Along with the UK, the revised Directive will be implemented on 1 January 2019 in Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden.

Analysis provided by GlobalPSC Corporate Members Lorax Compliance.

 

Chris van Rossem – Executive Member of GlobalPSC Director Technical Advisory Services at Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:30 pm, September 14th, 2017Comments0

Chris van Rossem is Director, Technical Advisory Services at Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance (CSSA). CSSA represents the recycling interests of Canadian businesses, creating convenient, clever, environmentally sustainable ways for consumers to dispose of the paper, packaging and products these businesses create—from newspapers to glass, metals to plastics. CSSA is a national, non-profit organization, founded by leading retailers and manufacturers, bringing together key players to achieve better recycling performance. CSSA is dedicated to providing support services to packaging and printed paper stewardship programs across Canada. CSSA’s six stewardship programs include:

  • Recycle BC Packaging and Printed Paper Program
  • MMSW Household Packaging and Paper Program,
  • MMSM Packaging and Printed Paper Program
  • Stewardship Ontario Packaging and Printed Paper Program
  • Stewardship Ontario Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program
  • Automotive Materials Stewardship Program

Prior to joining CSSA, Chris was Manager, Policy and Planning at Waste Diversion Ontario, the then provincial organization responsible for monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of Ontario’s four waste diversion programs.

Chris spent almost 10 years living in Sweden and working at the International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE) at Lund University, where he received both his MSc in Environmental Management and Policy, and his PhD in Industrial Environmental Economics.  His research investigated how the design of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation, particularly in the electrical and electronic equipment sector, impacts incentives for improved product design.

 

Review of Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme – White Paper

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:26 pm, August 31st, 2017Comments0

Australia’s Product Stewardship Act requires a five-year review that has been announced but has yet to be initiated. Part of the announced review is an assessment of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.

The GlobalPSC and several of our members joined Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform (ANZRP) / TechCollect at Parliament House in Canberra for the launch of ANZRP’s White Paper on findings and recommendations for the Department of Environment and Energy to consider during the review.

Tim Wilson MP, Federal Member for Goldstein, joined ANZRP CEO Carmel Dollisson on behalf of the Minister for the Environment and Energy, to officially launch ANZRP’s White Paper.

The White Paper includes several recommendations for the Government to consider, including:

  • Redefining the volume of available e-waste
  • Educating the public on the benefits of product stewardship
  • Expanding the products collected
  • A greater level of shared responsibility by all stakeholders in the product lifecycle
  • Greater transparency within the Scheme itself

Dollisson adds: “The core principle of good product stewardship is that everyone involved in producing, selling, using and disposing of products has a shared responsibility to ensure those products are responsibly recycled.

“That principle has been behind our development of the White Paper. We’re very hopeful that the Review will facilitate greater collaboration and ensure confidence in the e-waste recycling industry.”

 

CEO & Business Leaders Summit 2015

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:33 pm, November 24th, 2015Comments1

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GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin was invited to participate again this year in the CEO & Business Leaders Summit in Sydney, Australia. The Summit is a gathering of a global alliance of CEOs, senior executives and experts involved in creating advanced and sustainable projects worldwide. Speakers at the event are shown above and their roles are highlighted here.

Russ’s presentation on global projects and initiatives highlighted some of challenges of managing various wastes, especially for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).  The GlobalPSC’s collaboration with the SMaRT Centre at the University of New South Wales and proposed research on global WEEE models were also addressed. The presentation is available to GlobalPSC members in the Knowledge Base. Other speakers highlighted a range of challenges including changing resource and economic needs in China and South East Asia, opportunities for the circular economy and development of smart cities, sustainable financing, G20 discussions and emerging technologies with an emphasis on medical technologies.

 

Consultation on New Zealand e-Waste Product Stewardship Draft Report

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:40 pm, May 14th, 2015Comments0

The team developing an e-waste product stewardship framework for New Zealand has released a Draft Report to stakeholders for comment.

The report contains domestic and international issues for managing e-waste, stakeholder input, data analysis, options considered and a recommended framework.

Stakeholders are invited to email written comments on the #eWasteNZ Draft Report to ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com by Friday 22 May 2015 in order to help inform a final version that will be submitted to the Ministry for the Environment for consideration. If any difficulties accessing the document arise, a PDF version is available by emailing ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com.

 

New Zealand Feedback on Priority Waste Streams

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:22 pm, April 30th, 2015Comments1

The New Zealand Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has released a summary of submissions on its discussion paper on the prioritisation of waste streams for product stewardship intervention.

Stakeholders generally agreed with the MfE’s criteria for prioritisation but suggested weighting ‘risk of harm’ and ‘resource efficiency’ higher than other criteria. Stakeholders also generally agreed with the MfE’s proposed priority products (electronic and electrical equipment; tyres; agrichemicals and farm plastics; and refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases), but recommended adding packaging and plastic bags for prioritisation.

Mike Mendonca of the MfE (pictured below) announced the summary’s release and reviewed its findings during the recent WasteMINZ Roundup in Auckland, which emphasised product stewardship. In a session with Mike and WasteMINZ Board Chair Darren Patterson, GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin outlined overseas developments in product stewardship and their implications for New Zealand.

GlobalPSC Advisory Group members Helen Lewis of Helen Lewis Research and John Gertsakis of Infoactiv were also active participants in the Roundup discussions, as was Paul-Antoine Bontinck of the Vinyl Council of Australia.

Public consultations on priority products opened in May 2014.  The GlobalPSC submission developed in conjunction with our Advisory Group is available to GlobalPSC members via our Knowledge Base, under the Frameworks and Harmonisation heading.

 

Australia Conducts Operational Review of National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC at 12:52 pm, December 2nd, 2014Comments2

Australia is conducting an operational review of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (the scheme). Australia’s Minister for the Environment, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, announced the scheme’s review on 22 September 2014. A fact sheet and discussion paper on the review are now available. The Department of the Environment has invited submissions on the operational review by 6 February 2015.

The scheme was established nearly three years ago to achieve the following key objectives:

  • Recycle televisions and computers rather than landfill them.
  • Build on existing e-waste management activities across Australia, including ongoing activities by private and charitable recyclers and state and local government efforts.
  • Implement a progressively higher annual recycling target to increase television and computer recycling to 80 per cent within 10 years.
  • To incentivise investment, increase capacity and create employment within the recycling industry in Australia.

UNIDO and Dell Cooperate on E-waste Solutions in Africa, Asia and Latin America

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:10 pm, September 29th, 2014Comments1

The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and Dell (a GlobalPSC Corporate Member) have signed an agreement to cooperate on identifying and implementing a sustainable solution model for e-waste management for developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Developing countries are expected to account for the majority of discarded electronics by 2016, and twice that of developed regions by 2030.

The memorandum of understanding signed by UNIDO’s Director General LI Yong and Dell Inc.’s Executive Director of Sustainability David Lear (pictured below with Jean Cox-Kearns, Director of Compliance – Dell Global Takeback), commits the two organizations to work together for a five-year period, with an option to extend the partnership.

“Enabling recycling infrastructure in developing countries has significant benefits for the environment and local community, and facilitates Dell with the recovery of valuable resources currently being discarded. Together with UNIDO we will work to establish or up-scale facilities to operate environmentally sound management practices that meet international standards for e-waste recycling and further powers the circular economy for IT,” said Lear.

Lear added, “We are going to continue to support governments in developing effective regulations and policies for e-waste management. Since policy development is a multi-stage process, Dell and UNIDO will support governments in the dialogue and dissemination activities to accompany the various stages of policy development, and this will include organizing and participating in consultation meetings with major stakeholder groups representing industry associations, civil society groups, formal and informal sector collectors, recyclers and representative associations.”

Through the collaboration, UNIDO and Dell aim to create awareness, build capacity, and engage in knowledge sharing and policy advocacy with regard to sustainable e-waste management; to support the creation of an operational and economically viable collection network, and dismantling and recycling facilities, to process e-waste in developing countries in a safe and environmentally sound way; and to support the development of local recycling infrastructure, contributing to the industrial development of these countries and creating sustainable, green economies.

UNIDO has an established e-waste program that addresses the full life cycle of ICT equipment by properly dismantling and recycling it once the equipment has become obsolete. The program aims to foster the development of an environmentally sound e-waste recycling industry in developing countries.

With the active support of 35 National Cleaner Production Centres, UNIDO focuses on promoting an environmental service industry in developing countries; preparing national e-waste assessment reports; establishing partnerships with national and international institutions from the public and private sector; and facilitating the establishment of local and regional e-waste dismantling and recycling facilities.

Dell began integrating sustainability features into its products and processes nearly 30 years ago with designs that were upgradable, serviceable and recyclable because it was good for business, customers, and the environment. Dell is building on this commitment through its recently launched Legacy of Good plan outlining its vision for 2020. As part of this plan, Dell has a goal to eliminate two billion pounds of used electronics by 2020, which will be achieved through Dell’s recycling programs for homes and businesses in 78 countries.

GlobalPSC Corporate Member – Electronic Products Recycling Association (EPRA)

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:13 pm, July 11th, 2014Comments7

 

Created in 2011 by Canada’s electronics industry, the Electronic Products Recycling Association (EPRA) is a national, voluntary, not-for-profit environmental compliance program dedicated to upholding high standards for the recycling of end-of-life electronics and providing secure, convenient recycling options throughout participating regions. EPRA currently operates provincially-approved and regulatory compliant electronics stewardship programs in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador.

EPRA enables businesses and consumers to responsibly manage their end-of-life electronics, and assists obligated stewards in achieving regulatory compliance. EPRA programs are funded by an Environmental Handling Fee (EHF) on the sale of new obligated products to cover 100% of the costs of responsible recycling. Currently there are over 6,400 program stewards registered in EPRA programs across the country with over 1,450 permanent collection sites available to the public, and over 65 qualified recyclers responsibly processing EPRA e-waste. EPRA programs have safely processed close to 450,000 metric tonnes of end-of-life electronics since their programs began.

EPRA is committed to ensuring responsible recycling of end-of-life electronics collected by the EPRA programs through adherence to the Recycler Qualification Program (RQP), an open standard and comprehensive process that ensures products and resulting materials are handled in an environmentally sound and socially acceptable manner that protects the environment and safeguards worker health and safety. EPRA’s Director of Harmonisation, Jay Illingworth, serves as a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

Click below to watch the EPRA video on “What happens to end-of-life electronics.”

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European Experience on Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:37 pm, July 10th, 2014Comments0

The European Commission has developed guidance drawing on European experience with extended producer responsibility (EPR) schemes. The report provides an overview of existing EPR schemes in the EU-28, examines their performance and reports on their cost-effectiveness (fees paid by producers vs. collection rates) by product type via 36 case studies.

Some of the interesting findings include:

  • The extent to which net operational costs are covered by producers’ fees is highly variable. Using packaging as an example, the net cost coverage by producers’ fees ranges from around 10 % in the UK to 100% in five of the Member States examined.
  • Sound waste management and recycling have generally improved, notably through the implementation of EPR.
  • There is a general lack of transparency and availability of reliable data, especially for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).
  • The best performing schemes are not necessarily the most expensive.
  • No single EPR model emerges as the best performing and the most cost-effective.
  • There is no clear evidence of a strong positive impact of EPR on the eco-design of the products.
  • Few or no targets or indicators regarding eco-design have been developed.
  • Collective schemes can de-incentivise individual producers’ efforts for eco-design.

The report is provided in the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members, under the Programs tab.

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