Posts Tagged ‘Packaging’

Ed Cordner – Executive Member of GlobalPSC

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:00 pm, September 14th, 2017Comments3

Ed Cordner spent more than 20 years in the packaging and paper industries, including J.Gadsden, Associated Pulp & Paper Mills and ACI Glass (now Owens-Illinois). During this time he spent 6 years in South East Asia, gaining extensive national and international management experience through general management and sales & marketing roles.

He commenced as the inaugural CEO of the National Packaging Covenant in 2003. The Covenant is a unique, co-regulatory product stewardship agreement between the packaging supply chain and governments, aiming to reduce the environmental impacts of packaging.

In 2008 he successfully coordinated a review of the progress of the Covenant to inform the development of a future Covenant framework. As a result of this review the current Australian Packaging Covenant, incorporating the Sustainable Packaging Guidelines, came into effect in July 2010 and is Australia’s primary mechanism for dealing with used packaging.

Subsequently, Ed has undertaken various consultancies in the environmental management field including with the Metropolitan Waste Management Group, responsible for coordinating and facilitating the delivery of municipal solid waste management across metropolitan Melbourne.

Ed has a Bachelor of Science in zoology and biochemistry from LaTrobe University.

 

Chris van Rossem – Executive Member of GlobalPSC Director Technical Advisory Services at Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:30 pm, September 14th, 2017Comments0

Chris van Rossem is Director, Technical Advisory Services at Canadian Stewardship Services Alliance (CSSA). CSSA represents the recycling interests of Canadian businesses, creating convenient, clever, environmentally sustainable ways for consumers to dispose of the paper, packaging and products these businesses create—from newspapers to glass, metals to plastics. CSSA is a national, non-profit organization, founded by leading retailers and manufacturers, bringing together key players to achieve better recycling performance. CSSA is dedicated to providing support services to packaging and printed paper stewardship programs across Canada. CSSA’s six stewardship programs include:

  • Recycle BC Packaging and Printed Paper Program
  • MMSW Household Packaging and Paper Program,
  • MMSM Packaging and Printed Paper Program
  • Stewardship Ontario Packaging and Printed Paper Program
  • Stewardship Ontario Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program
  • Automotive Materials Stewardship Program

Prior to joining CSSA, Chris was Manager, Policy and Planning at Waste Diversion Ontario, the then provincial organization responsible for monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of Ontario’s four waste diversion programs.

Chris spent almost 10 years living in Sweden and working at the International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE) at Lund University, where he received both his MSc in Environmental Management and Policy, and his PhD in Industrial Environmental Economics.  His research investigated how the design of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation, particularly in the electrical and electronic equipment sector, impacts incentives for improved product design.

 

Joachim Quoden – Executive Member of GlobalPSC Managing Director of EXPRA

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:00 pm, September 14th, 2017Comments0

Joachim Quoden has extensive experience in packaging waste management, dating from 1992 when he spent 4 months in the German Federal Ministry of Environment working on packaging issues including the German Packaging Ordinance. From 1993 to 2006, Joachim worked with Der Grüne Punkt – Duales System Deutschland GmbH (DSD), where he was appointed head of International Affairs in 2001.

Between 2001 and 2013, he also became Secretary General and later Managing Director of PRO EUROPE, the umbrella organisation of 35 packaging recovery organisations. Since 2013, Joachim acts as Managing Director of EXPRA, a new alliance of 25 producer responsibility organizations (PROs) from currently more than 23 countries.

Besides the above, Joachim has been working since 1995 as independent lawyer in Germany specializing in international EPR legislation, chairperson of ISWA’s Governance & Legal working group, member of the OECD EPR expert group and has served as an expert in ISO global standardisation project SIS/TK 165/AG 10 Packaging and Environment.

Rodrigo Leiva Neumann – Executive Member of GlobalPSC General Manager of Valoryza

Posted by GlobalPSC at 11:00 am, September 14th, 2017Comments0

Rodrigo Leiva Neumann’s 25-year career in waste management began in France and continued in Chile, where he managed national waste and recovery programs across several industry sectors as a Veolia Environment executive. Rod established his consulting practice, Valoryza, in 2010 to play an active role in in the establishment of Chile’s new Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) approach.

Rod has been actively involved in Chilean EPR since its introduction in 2010. He works closely with the Chilean Environmental Agency and major industry producers –  initially to develop the nation’s EPR Law Framework – and more recently, to advise Government and Industry on the implementation of EPR Law relating to Chile’s 6 priority products (packaging, WEEE, tyres, used oils, car batteries and batteries for electronic devices).

As a former Chair of the Chilean AEPA (Association of Companies for the Environment), Rod played a key role in developing a collaborative professional community focused on Chile’s emerging waste management services, recycling, environmental technologies, water treatment solutions, and consultancy companies.

Rod’s consultancy also supports the design and administration of Product Stewardship initiatives (including Chile’s first Product Stewardship for used glass bottles), advises major producers (including Coca Cola bottlers, Walmart) on waste and recovery feasibility, strategy, design, planning and implementation.

Rod’s keen interest in international EPR and Product Stewardship best practice, and how these can be applied in Latin America has extended his network across the globe, where he engages with authorities and Product Stewardship organizations in the EU, Canada, Australia and USA.

Rod graduated as an Industrial Engineer from the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile and holds an MBA from Lleida University, Spain.

PET Recycling Growth in South Africa

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:36 pm, April 30th, 2017Comments0

 

PETCO, the organization responsible for fulfilling the South African PET plastic industry’s role of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), recently announced their annual PET recycling rate had increased from 52% of post-consumer bottle PET in 2015 to 55% in 2016, exceeding their expected target for the second consecutive year.

PETCO recycled an additional 22% of post-consumer bottles in comparison to the previous year, with the total PET market growing by 14.8% to 241,269 tonnes.

“PETCO is delighted with the latest figures,” says PETCO’s CEO Cheri Scholtz. “Through the remarkable network of people, companies and organisations we work with, 2 billion PET bottles were collected for recycling across South Africa during the course of 2016, creating some 62,000 income opportunities for small and micro-collectors, and changing their lives and those of their families in immeasurable ways.”

The voluntary recycling fee paid annually by PETCO members on every tonne of raw material purchased has enabled the payment of a total of R1.9 billion (~ 130 million or ~US$142 million) by contracted recyclers to collectors for baled bottles since the inception of PETCO in 2004, ensuring the collection of PET bottles for recycling is sustained, and resulting in almost 800,000 tonnes of carbon and over 3 million m3 of landfill space saved to date.

PETCO reports that South Africa’s 55% post-consumer PET recycling rate compares well with international PET recycling rates of ~ 30% in the US and European average rates of ~ 59%. However, PETCO also notes that considerable work is being done globally to understand these statistics, as the bases differ substantially and a direct comparison cannot be assumed.

Information and graphic supplied by PETCO.

 

CleanFARMS Expands Programming to Seed and Pesticide Bags

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:26 am, October 28th, 2015Comments1

Canada’s leading agricultural stewardship organization, CleanFARMS, is expanding its stewardship programming. Starting in 2016, Eastern Canadian farmers will have access to a seed and pesticide bag collection program that will help keep these bags out of municipal landfills.

This program draws its roots in the Maritimes where farmers, ag-retailers and stewards have been working together to collect and safely dispose of empty pesticide bags since 2006. The program then moved west to Ontario and Quebec where it was offered on a pilot basis in select regions from 2012 – 2015.

The program will collect both small pesticide and seed bags (typically under 30 kilograms) and bigger bulk bags. The small bags are generally made of multi-walled paper though some manufacturers are using other materials such as plastic and plastic laminates. Most bulk bags (mainly 500 kg and 1000 kg) bags are made of woven poly-propylene plastic.

Empty bags will be accepted back at the point of purchase which gives farmers easily accessible collection points. They are then disposed of through waste to energy incineration facilities. As the program grows, CleanFARMS hopes to move higher up on the 3Rs hierarchy by recycling of the bags. The key to recycling some of these bags will be to ensure a consistent and adequate supply of the bags.

CleanFARMS and its predecessor CropLife Canada, on behalf of the agricultural industry, have been operating extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs for over 25 years. This new program shows that the agricultural industry embraces EPR and incorporates the practice as normal business practice.

In 2014, 197,000 bags were collected through the program. This is in addition to the 4.5 million containers that came through CleanFARMS’ award-winning empty pesticide and fertilizer container recycling program. To round off 2014, 224,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and 5,000 kilograms of obsolete livestock medication were collected and safely destroyed.

CleanFARMS now joins agricultural stewardship organizations around the world offering EPR programs on a voluntary basis with results rivalling most regulated programs.

Visit here for more information.

Photo supplied by CleanFARMS.

 

Guest Blog – Dutch Sustainability Plans for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:24 pm, August 13th, 2015Comments2

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Gill Bevington, Policy Analyst, Packaging for Perchards.

 

 

The packaging sustainability institute, KIDV, KIDV has published an overview in English about the progress of the sustainability plans which industry undertook to develop as part of its commitments in the Framework Agreement on Packaging.

KIDV reports that sectoral sustainability plans covering 80% of the weight of packaging on the market have now been submitted. This first set of plans sets out objectives and measures to achieve them by 2018 and further plans will be developed with objectives for 2022.

Since the Framework Agreement was signed, the Packaging Decree has been revised. The revised Decree, which was adopted in 2014, gives the Minister powers to impose statutory sustainability requirements on packaging. These new powers are seen as fall back powers if the plans now being developed do not deliver the results the Dutch authorities are hoping for. It is important therefore that Dutch industry supports and implements the plans.

KIDV’s methodology for the plans is to identify the front runners in each sector, and then aim to bring all companies in that sector up to the same level. Targets for the sector are based on the best in class. The plans were assessed by an independent review committee established by KIDV and consisting of four experts from different universities.

As KIDV’s approach was innovative, it was challenging to get the sectors involved in the development of the plans. Some showed reluctance at first, comments KIDV, but because the approach was unfamiliar, not through lack of interest. KIDV warns that the process will take time, depending on the level of investment needed to implement the plans and because the scientific knowledge needed to set targets was not available in all cases.

Each sectoral plan sets out the measures to be taken by producers in order to increase the sustainability of product-pack combinations within their sector, both measures to be taken by 2018 and then by 2022. Each sector is responsible for implementing its plan. The focus is currently on the product-pack combinations with the greatest potential environmental benefit.

The first plans to be developed cover the fruit and vegetables, food (including animal feed) and e-commerce sectors. A sub-plan for rPET 2018-2022 has been submitted by the Dutch association for soft drinks, waters and juices.

The main focus of the first plans to be submitted is:

  • greater use of sustainably managed and certified raw materials, such as FSC;
  • increase in the proportion of secondary raw materials in packaging, such as in plastic bottles and pots, tubs and trays (PTT)s;
  • decrease in the quantity of materials used, through optimisation and source reduction;
  • increasing the recyclability of packaging, through the use of mono-materials;
  • use of recycling logos on packaging to enable consumers to sort their packaging better.

There is nothing new about policy-makers encouraging producers to improve the environmental performance of their packaging. Industry bodies throughout Europe have for years published good practice examples of optimised packaging, including source reduction, improved recyclability etc, which aim both to encourage other producers and to demonstrate to policy-makers the efforts being made.

It has always been up to each producer to decide whether and how to optimise its packaging. Even in countries like Belgium and Spain, where producers have to submit prevention plans to the authorities, the producers set their own targets in their plans. But the new Dutch approach is different – it seeks to identify which are the best product-pack combinations in a sector under different headings and then to bring all producers in that sector up to that standard. With the threat of legislation if the plans do not yield as much as expected, sectoral trade associations will be working hard to encourage their members to participate in the process.

But it raises some questions:

  • What happens if the front runner is in that enviable position because of a unique set of circumstances which other producers in the sector cannot emulate?
  • How much pressure will individual companies be under to improve their sustainability in order to meet the targets in the plan? There may be sound reasons why a producer cannot match the best in class. Plans are being implemented by the sectors so individual companies will be judged by their peers (competitors) who will understand the constraints. But if it looks as though the objectives in a plan will not be met, which could have implications for all producers in the sector, what then?
  • What about imported products, for which the importer will have to persuade its foreign suppliers to make the necessary changes? That might not be possible or desirable because of the longer transport distances and/or because the preferred packaging type is not available in the country of production. Individual Dutch importers are of course free to set their own product/packaging specifications, but if those specifications are set out in a formal plan, could they represent a barrier to trade to suppliers in other EU member states?
  • Could there be problems with commercial confidentiality? Some front runners may be happy to be named and to provide information about their packaging. But others may prefer to keep the data confidential because their optimised packaging helps to give them their competitive edge. And will the laggards be named and shamed, even if there are sound reasons why they cannot match the best in class?

What happens if the results in 2018 are not as good as expected, even if the sectors have worked hard to improve the sustainability of their packaging? How will Dutch policy-makers respond? Will they acknowledge that the achievements are as good as they possibly can be and that, using the methodology, performance will continue to improve in future? Or will they conclude that this “voluntary” action is insufficient and that legislation is necessary? It remains to be seen whether this new Dutch approach is just rhetoric or whether it will deliver real improvements.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

Gill Bevington joined Perchards in 1991 and currently serves as Policy Analyst, Packaging. She monitors, analyses and reports on European legislative developments on packaging (and industry response to them) at national and EU level, and is an expert on national packaging waste management initiatives across Europe. Gill has carried out many tailor-made studies for clients on aspects of the packaging legislation in place in various European countries and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject. 

 

PVC Resource Summit 2015

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:26 pm, August 12th, 2015Comments0

The Vinyl Council of Australia is convening an interactive Resource Summit to form alliances and plans for PVC recovery and recycling.

The summit will:

  • explore opportunities to access and source PVC for cost-effective input into new products
  • identify products, markets and challenges and form strategies for the future
  • combine expertise and networks to accelerate recovery and recycling in Australia

Key facts include:

  • in 2014 PVC use in Australia reached 190,000 tonnes for windows, flooring, medical, packaging and other areas
  • 85% of PVC is used in durable applications, particularly building products
  • there is an estimated 67,000 tonnes per annum of PVC waste to recycle in Australia
  • currently about 10-15% of this waste is diverted from landfill for recycling

Program and registration details are available here.

 

São Paulo Brazil Introduces Reverse Logistics Requirements for Products and Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC at 6:34 pm, July 31st, 2015Comments1

São Paulo Brazil’s Department of the Environment has introduced obligations on manufacturers, importers, distributors and traders for reverse logistics systems for a range of products and packaging (with some specified exemptions). Specified products include:

  • used lubricating oil
  • edible oil
  • automotive oil filters
  • automotive batteries
  • portable batteries and batteries
  • electronic products and components
  • fluorescent, sodium vapor, mercury and mixed lights
  • scrap tires
  • expired or unused medicines

The GlobalPSC is in the process of seeking clarification of several key provisions and will advise accordingly.

 

South Africa Requires Industry Waste Management Plans

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:20 pm, July 31st, 2015Comments1

iStock_000004145826_Large_South_Africa_Flag

South Africa has issued requirements for the paper and packaging industry, electrical and electronic equipment industry and lighting industry to prepare and submit industry waste management plans for approval by the Minister of Environmental Affairs under the National Environmental Management Act 2008.

Details on requirements, consultation process, timeframes and penalties for non-compliance are available to GlobalPSC members in the Knowledge Base under the Frameworks & Harmonization tab.

 

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Global Product Stewardship Council

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Email: info@globalpsc.net