Posts Tagged ‘plastic’

U.S. Limits Microbeads

Posted by GlobalPSC at 11:02 am, January 31st, 2016Comments1

The U.S. has passed a law to ban rinse-off cosmetics that contain synthetic plastic microbeads. The ban takes effect 1 January 2018.

The Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015 will prohibit “the manufacture and introduction into interstate commerce of rinse-off cosmetics containing intentionally-added plastic microbeads.” The Act specifically includes toothpaste in the type of cosmetics subject to the ban.

 

CleanFARMS Expands Programming to Seed and Pesticide Bags

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:26 am, October 28th, 2015Comments1

Canada’s leading agricultural stewardship organization, CleanFARMS, is expanding its stewardship programming. Starting in 2016, Eastern Canadian farmers will have access to a seed and pesticide bag collection program that will help keep these bags out of municipal landfills.

This program draws its roots in the Maritimes where farmers, ag-retailers and stewards have been working together to collect and safely dispose of empty pesticide bags since 2006. The program then moved west to Ontario and Quebec where it was offered on a pilot basis in select regions from 2012 – 2015.

The program will collect both small pesticide and seed bags (typically under 30 kilograms) and bigger bulk bags. The small bags are generally made of multi-walled paper though some manufacturers are using other materials such as plastic and plastic laminates. Most bulk bags (mainly 500 kg and 1000 kg) bags are made of woven poly-propylene plastic.

Empty bags will be accepted back at the point of purchase which gives farmers easily accessible collection points. They are then disposed of through waste to energy incineration facilities. As the program grows, CleanFARMS hopes to move higher up on the 3Rs hierarchy by recycling of the bags. The key to recycling some of these bags will be to ensure a consistent and adequate supply of the bags.

CleanFARMS and its predecessor CropLife Canada, on behalf of the agricultural industry, have been operating extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs for over 25 years. This new program shows that the agricultural industry embraces EPR and incorporates the practice as normal business practice.

In 2014, 197,000 bags were collected through the program. This is in addition to the 4.5 million containers that came through CleanFARMS’ award-winning empty pesticide and fertilizer container recycling program. To round off 2014, 224,000 kilograms of obsolete pesticides and 5,000 kilograms of obsolete livestock medication were collected and safely destroyed.

CleanFARMS now joins agricultural stewardship organizations around the world offering EPR programs on a voluntary basis with results rivalling most regulated programs.

Visit here for more information.

Photo supplied by CleanFARMS.

 

Guest Blog – Dutch Sustainability Plans for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:24 pm, August 13th, 2015Comments2

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Gill Bevington, Policy Analyst, Packaging for Perchards.

 

 

The packaging sustainability institute, KIDV, KIDV has published an overview in English about the progress of the sustainability plans which industry undertook to develop as part of its commitments in the Framework Agreement on Packaging.

KIDV reports that sectoral sustainability plans covering 80% of the weight of packaging on the market have now been submitted. This first set of plans sets out objectives and measures to achieve them by 2018 and further plans will be developed with objectives for 2022.

Since the Framework Agreement was signed, the Packaging Decree has been revised. The revised Decree, which was adopted in 2014, gives the Minister powers to impose statutory sustainability requirements on packaging. These new powers are seen as fall back powers if the plans now being developed do not deliver the results the Dutch authorities are hoping for. It is important therefore that Dutch industry supports and implements the plans.

KIDV’s methodology for the plans is to identify the front runners in each sector, and then aim to bring all companies in that sector up to the same level. Targets for the sector are based on the best in class. The plans were assessed by an independent review committee established by KIDV and consisting of four experts from different universities.

As KIDV’s approach was innovative, it was challenging to get the sectors involved in the development of the plans. Some showed reluctance at first, comments KIDV, but because the approach was unfamiliar, not through lack of interest. KIDV warns that the process will take time, depending on the level of investment needed to implement the plans and because the scientific knowledge needed to set targets was not available in all cases.

Each sectoral plan sets out the measures to be taken by producers in order to increase the sustainability of product-pack combinations within their sector, both measures to be taken by 2018 and then by 2022. Each sector is responsible for implementing its plan. The focus is currently on the product-pack combinations with the greatest potential environmental benefit.

The first plans to be developed cover the fruit and vegetables, food (including animal feed) and e-commerce sectors. A sub-plan for rPET 2018-2022 has been submitted by the Dutch association for soft drinks, waters and juices.

The main focus of the first plans to be submitted is:

  • greater use of sustainably managed and certified raw materials, such as FSC;
  • increase in the proportion of secondary raw materials in packaging, such as in plastic bottles and pots, tubs and trays (PTT)s;
  • decrease in the quantity of materials used, through optimisation and source reduction;
  • increasing the recyclability of packaging, through the use of mono-materials;
  • use of recycling logos on packaging to enable consumers to sort their packaging better.

There is nothing new about policy-makers encouraging producers to improve the environmental performance of their packaging. Industry bodies throughout Europe have for years published good practice examples of optimised packaging, including source reduction, improved recyclability etc, which aim both to encourage other producers and to demonstrate to policy-makers the efforts being made.

It has always been up to each producer to decide whether and how to optimise its packaging. Even in countries like Belgium and Spain, where producers have to submit prevention plans to the authorities, the producers set their own targets in their plans. But the new Dutch approach is different – it seeks to identify which are the best product-pack combinations in a sector under different headings and then to bring all producers in that sector up to that standard. With the threat of legislation if the plans do not yield as much as expected, sectoral trade associations will be working hard to encourage their members to participate in the process.

But it raises some questions:

  • What happens if the front runner is in that enviable position because of a unique set of circumstances which other producers in the sector cannot emulate?
  • How much pressure will individual companies be under to improve their sustainability in order to meet the targets in the plan? There may be sound reasons why a producer cannot match the best in class. Plans are being implemented by the sectors so individual companies will be judged by their peers (competitors) who will understand the constraints. But if it looks as though the objectives in a plan will not be met, which could have implications for all producers in the sector, what then?
  • What about imported products, for which the importer will have to persuade its foreign suppliers to make the necessary changes? That might not be possible or desirable because of the longer transport distances and/or because the preferred packaging type is not available in the country of production. Individual Dutch importers are of course free to set their own product/packaging specifications, but if those specifications are set out in a formal plan, could they represent a barrier to trade to suppliers in other EU member states?
  • Could there be problems with commercial confidentiality? Some front runners may be happy to be named and to provide information about their packaging. But others may prefer to keep the data confidential because their optimised packaging helps to give them their competitive edge. And will the laggards be named and shamed, even if there are sound reasons why they cannot match the best in class?

What happens if the results in 2018 are not as good as expected, even if the sectors have worked hard to improve the sustainability of their packaging? How will Dutch policy-makers respond? Will they acknowledge that the achievements are as good as they possibly can be and that, using the methodology, performance will continue to improve in future? Or will they conclude that this “voluntary” action is insufficient and that legislation is necessary? It remains to be seen whether this new Dutch approach is just rhetoric or whether it will deliver real improvements.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

Gill Bevington joined Perchards in 1991 and currently serves as Policy Analyst, Packaging. She monitors, analyses and reports on European legislative developments on packaging (and industry response to them) at national and EU level, and is an expert on national packaging waste management initiatives across Europe. Gill has carried out many tailor-made studies for clients on aspects of the packaging legislation in place in various European countries and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject. 

 

GlobalPSC Member – CleanFARMS Inc.

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:57 am, July 8th, 2014Comments4

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CleanFARMS Inc. is Canada’s leading agricultural industry stewardship organisation, best known for its empty pesticide and fertilizer container recycling program and obsolete pesticide collection campaign. CleanFARMS is currently expanding its stewardship programming to include other types of agricultural waste such as seed and pesticide bags, obsolete equine & livestock medications and other ag-waste plastics and packaging generated on the farm. CleanFARMS’ long term goal is to develop new programs for reclaiming and recycling a wider variety of ag-waste packaging.

CleanFARMS is proud to have the support of the Canadian crop protection and fertilizer industries who make up the majority of its members. Its member companies are seen as world leaders who incorporate extended producer responsibility into their core business planning and who make significant contributions to sustainable agriculture. Other partners include volunteer collection sites, grower groups, the animal health industry, the Canadian product stewardship community and, most importantly, Canadian farmers who are its front line stewards.

2013 was a significant year for the organization when the empty pesticide and fertiliser container program, which has been operating since 1989, collected its 100th million container. This program boasts a return rate of 60 – 65% and is regarded as one of Canada’s highest performing voluntary stewardship programs.

Starting in 2016, Eastern Canadian farmers will have access to a seed and pesticide bag collection program that will help keep these bags out of municipal landfills.

Learn more here.

 

GlobalPSC Member – PET Recycling Company (PETCO)

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:18 am, June 24th, 2014Comments6

PETCO_Logo_smallPETCO is the trading name of the PET Recycling Company (Pty) Ltd and represents the South African plastic industry’s proven joint effort to self-regulate post-consumer Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) recycling.

PETCO is financed by a voluntary recycling levy paid by converters on PET resin purchased. PETCO also receives grants from brand owners and resin producers.

Support for PET recycling efforts ensures an on-going monetary value for post-consumer PET. This sustains collection interest and reduces the volume of post-consumer PET in the waste stream.

On-going consumer and public education and awareness activities promote environmental responsibility and encourage PET recycling. By taking responsibility for post-consumer PET recycling, PETCO imposes accountability over the entire life cycle of PET products and packaging. This means that companies that manufacture, import and/or sell PET products and packaging are financially and physically responsible for such products after their useful life. In the case of post-consumer PET, this responsibility has been delegated to a third party, namely PETCO, who fulfils the PET industry’s role of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR). EPR promotes the integration of environmental costs associated with PET products throughout their life cycle into the market costs of the products and shifts responsibility for the used container from government to private industry.

PETCO’s MISSION

PETCO aims to minimise the environmental impact of post-consumer PET on the South African landscape by:

• Achieving sustainable growth in PET plastic recycling;

• Supporting existing and encouraging new PET collection and recycling networks; and

• Promoting consumer education and awareness programmes.

PETCO CEO Cheri Scholtz serves as a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

For a nice look at some of the people helping to increase PET recycling in South Africa and the approaches they use, see the video below.

 

Beverage Containers on Deposit

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:00 am, April 2nd, 2013Comments0

Encorp Pacific was founded in 1994 and is an industry operated, not for profit, Product Stewardship Corporation acting on behalf of 250 brand owners of non-alcoholic beverages and in excess of 1000 brandowners of beverage alcohol. The company is responsible for the administration, consumer education and recycling programs for all deposit bearing non-alcoholic beverage containers and all wine, spirits and non-refillable import beer and cooler containers in British Columbia. It operates a network of 170 independently owned ReturnIt depots and transportation and processing infrastructure servicing a population of 4.5 million. Encorp Pacific recycles 175 million pounds annually of mixed aluminum, plastic, glass and fibre board containers with an annual cash flow of C$150 million. Encorp, as a service provider, manages the recycling of dairy containers on behalf of the Dairy Council of BC and end of life electronics (computers, display devices, printers, audio/visual systems and consumer equipment) on behalf of Electronics Products Recycling Association of BC.

GlobalPSC Member Profile – RED Group

Posted by GlobalPSC at 11:08 am, December 7th, 2012Comments1

 

 

 

 

 

We welcome RED Group as the latest member of the Global Product Stewardship Council. The REDcycle Program has been developed and implemented by the RED Group to recover and recycle soft plastic bags and packaging returned to drop off points by Australian consumers. The material is processed in Melbourne and then sent on to Victorian company, Replas, to be converted into recycled plastic furniture for schools and communities. The program is a working product stewardship model and is proudly supported by program partners Coles, the Australian Food and Grocery Council, the Australian Packaging Covenant, Amcor and Replas. Some of Australia’s most loved brands are also participating including Arnott’s, Cadbury, Birds Eye, George Weston Foods, Goodman Fielder, Kellogg’s, Kimberly-Clark, McCain and SunRice.

The involvement of these producers, retailers and industry bodies ensure that everyone involved in the life cycle of a product – manufacturers, distributors and consumers – share responsibility for that product throughout its entire life cycle, including its end-of-life outcome.

Product Stewardship Institute Spring / Summer Webinar Series

Posted by GlobalPSC at 9:34 am, March 15th, 2012Comments0

13th Networking Webinar Series 

May 2012 – June 2012

Register now for the Product Stewardship Institute’s Spring/Summer webinar series! Topics include Local Government Perspectives on the Transition to EPR, Emerging Options for Simplified Lifecycle Analyses, Coke’s PlantBottle Packaging, Evaluating New York’s E-waste Program, and Voluntary and Mandatory Product Stewardship Programs.

  1. Making the Change: Local Government Perspectives on the Transition to EPR
  2. Lifecycle Flashing Before Your Eyes: Emerging Options for Simplified Lifecycle Analyses and Their Role in Product Stewardship
  3. One Year Later: Evaluating New York’s E-waste Program
  4. Voluntary and Mandatory Product Stewardship Programs — Finding the balance between government regulation and private sector initiative
  5. Coke’s PlantBottle Packaging – Changing the Way We View Product Impacts

PSI’s webinar registration fees have changed. For more information on registration and fees, contact PSI.


Making the Change: Local Government Perspectives on the Transition to EPR
Wednesday, May 9 2:00-3:30 PM EST/11:00-12:30 PM PST
Overview: Producer responsibility laws not only change the way waste management is financed but also change the roles played by all key stakeholders. This webinar will explore changes in local government agency roles following the implementation of U.S. stewardship laws on electronics and paint, and in British Columbia on a range of products, including packaging and printed materials. With the shifting of financial and management responsibility, producers naturally seek greater control of the system to reduce costs and achieve performance goals. On this webinar, speakers will explore how their roles are evolving or have changed pertaining to contracting for services, education of residents, collection of materials, and other key factors. They will also discuss how the roles changed for manufacturers, retailers, and other key stakeholders. In addition, these officials will provide suggestions to other local governments facing similar transitions, and discuss the challenges they faced in relinquishing control to manufacturers while maintaining their regulatory and oversight role. 

Moderator: Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Product Stewardship Institute

Speakers:

  • Karen Fiedler, Solid Waste Supervisor, Waukesha County, Wisconsin
  • Monica Kosmack, Program Manager – Zero Waste Planning, City of Vancouver, British Columbia
  • Donald Maglienti, Program Coordinator, Addison County Solid Waste Management District, Vermont

REGISTER HERE

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Lifecycle Flashing Before Your Eyes: Emerging Options for Simplified Lifecycle Analyses and Their Role in Product Stewardship
Tuesday, May 22 2:00-3:30 PM EST/11:00-12:30 PM PST
Overview: Lifecycle assessment (LCA) is a technique used to assess environmental impacts associated with all the stages of a product’s life from-cradle-to-grave, and provides a method to measure the ecological footprint of a particular product or service. The typical LCA is time and resource-intensive, and is often performed confidentially by an individual company or association. Several organizations are seeking to make the process more transparent and accessible by consolidating data, creating generic assessments for “prototype” products, and reducing the time and resources required. On this webinar, three national experts will present their unique approaches to LCA and discuss the relative merits and opportunities. The goal of the webinar is to make LCA more accessible to policy makers and those interested in learning more about how to apply these emerging tools. 

Moderator: Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Product Stewardship Institute

Speakers:

  • Jo Anne Shatkin, Chief Executive Officer, CLF Ventures
  • Greg Norris, Founder and Director, Sylvatica
  • Kevin Dooley, Academic Director, The Sustainability Consortium

REGISTER HERE

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One Year Later: Evaluating New York’s E-waste Program
Tuesday, June 5 2:00-3:30 PM EST/11:00-12:30 PM PST
Overview: When New York passed the nation’s 22nd state producer responsibility law in 2010, those working on legislative language had the benefit of lessons learned from other states and many viewed the law as among the most progressive in the nation to date. In the spring of 2012, data will be released on the program’s first year of implementation. This webinar will feature prominent players that made this law possible, and will cover a wide range of perspectives from representatives of an electronics manufacturer, state government, local government, electronics recycler, and a national environmental group. These panelists will reflect on the choices made during the passage of the legislation, the outcome of the law after one year, and changes they would recommend for program refinement in the future. 

Moderator: Kate Hagemann, Associate for Policy and Programs, Product Stewardship Institute

Speakers:

  • Mark Moroukian, Environmental Engineer, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
  • Resa Dimino, Consultant (formerly Director of Legislative Programs at WeRecycle!)
  • Kate Sinding, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
  • Eric Swenson, Superintendent of Environmental Control, Town of Oyster Bay, NY
  • Manufacturer representative, TBA

REGISTER HERE

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Voluntary and Mandatory Product Stewardship Programs—Finding the balance between government regulation and private sector initiative
Thursday, June 14 1:00-2:30 PM EST/10:00-11:30 PM PST
Overview: The producer responsibility approach seeks to engage manufacturers in taking greater financial and management responsibility for reducing the environmental and social impacts of their products over the entire lifecycle. Product stewardship programs can take the form of voluntary industry-driven programs, as well as programs that are regulated. Which achieve better outcomes? Which are most cost effective? Which ones are paving the way forward toward the proper balance between government regulation and free market innovation? Which functions are better for government to manage and which should be the domain of producers? This webinar will explore a controversial topic about which there are many strong opinions. We will hear from those who advocate for all sides of the issue, in the U.S. and Canada. 

Moderator: Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Product Stewardship Institute

Speakers:

  • Walter Alcorn, Vice President, Environmental Affairs and Industry Sustainability, Consumer Electronics Association
  • Neil Hastie, President and CEO, Encorp Pacific
  • Carl Smith, CEO/President, Call2Recycle
  • Garth Hickle, Product Stewardship Team Leader, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
  • David Lawes, Analyst – Public Safety and Prevention Initiatives, British Columbia Ministry of Environment
  • Sego Jackson, Principal Planner, Snohomish County, Washington

REGISTER HERE

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Coke’s PlantBottle Packaging – Changing the Way We View Product Impacts
Tuesday, June 26 2:00-3:30 PM EST/11:00-12:30 PM PST

Overview: In 2009, The Coca-Cola Company introduced a breakthrough innovation gloablly that it believes will have a revolutionary impact on the sustainability of commercial plastics. Coca-Cola’s new PlantBottle package contains up to 30 percent plant-based material, which looks, functions, and recycles just like traditional PET plastic, but with a lighter environmental footprint. That plant material replaces approximately one-third of the petroleum-based material that traditionally is used to make PET plastic bottles. In 2011, Coke also announced investments in three technologies it believes can deliver the first commercially viable solution for making the remaining 70% of PET plastic from plants and realizing the company’s vision of a 100% renewable, responsibly sourced and fully recyclable bottle.

This webinar will provide an in-depth focus on all aspects of the PlantBottle packaging supply chain, including material sourcing, manufacture, distribution, and post-consumer recycling. We will explore the lifecycle analysis that evaluated environmental impacts along the entire container supply chain, explore the relationship between this new packaging and Coke’s ongoing commitment to increasing recycling and using post-consumer recycled content in its bottles, and how the PlantBottle relates to the company’s investment in PET recycling plants.

Moderator: Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Product Stewardship Institute

Speaker: Scott Vitters, PlantBottle Packaging Innovation Platform General Manager, The Coca-Cola Company

REGISTER HERE

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Webinar Fees and Registration Information
  • Webinars are FREE for PSI Full Members and Sustaining Partners
  • PSI Partners pay $60 per webinar
  • Affiliate and Non PSI Members/Partners pay $95 per webinarNot sure if you are a PSI Member or Partner? Please visit the Membership and Partnership Information page to see if you qualify for a discounted rate. Interested attendees must register for each networking webinar separately. Non PSI Members or Partners will be contacted after registration for payment.

Questions? Contact Erin Linsky Graeber, PSI’s Senior Associate of Outreach and Communications at 617-236-4866 or erin@productstewardship.us

 

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GlobalPSC Corporate Member – TES-AMM Australia New Zealand

Posted by GlobalPSC at 7:30 am, February 22nd, 2012Comments15

 

 

 

 

 

 

TES-AMM Australia and New Zealand are part of the TES-Envirocorp group, a specialised electronic waste management organisation with core activities in:

  • Electronic Asset Management and Disposal Programs
  • Secure Data Destruction to US Dept of Defence Standards
  • Value Optimization for Used Electronic Equipment and Parts and Microsoft Approved Refurbisher
  • Recovery of Precious Metals from Electronic Waste
  • Recycling of Batteries (most chemistries)
  • Printer Consumables Recycling
  • Recycling of Epoxy and other Waste Plastic
  • Forward and Reverse Logistics Solutions
  • Project or Program Management

TES-AMM’s recycling operations span nearly 30 locations globally and are certified to international standards JAS-ANZ ISO9001, ISO14001, OHSAS18001 and R2 (Responsible Recycler). In Australia and New Zealand, TES-AMM has also been assessed to comply with DR AS/NZ 5377 interim standards for the collection, transport and recycling of end of life televisions and computers.

Because TES-AMM offers transparency and accountability in what they do, TES-AMM has become the strategic recycling vendor for many well-known Information and Communications Technology (ICT) companies and product stewardship organisations in the Asia Pacific and throughout other parts of the world. Coupled with TES-AMM’s “one stop shop” approach underpinned by compliance to local and international regulations and best practice standards, TES-AMM has a proven record of achieving environmentally beneficial outcomes, economies and service levels that meet or exceed the expectations of their clients.

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9449 9909
Fax: +61 2 9449 9901
Email: info@globalpsc.net