Posts Tagged ‘priority products’

Progressing Voluntary Paint Stewardship in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:28 pm, August 12th, 2015Comments1

iStock_000006361563SmallA voluntary national product stewardship scheme has moved one step closer to reality in Australia with the recent application for regulatory approval of an A$0.15/litre levy to be applied to the sale of new architectural and decorative paint in Australia.

Levy revenue would fund the not-for-profit company Paint Stewardship Ltd to administer all aspects of the collection scheme, including education, marketing and communication, R&D investment, transport and processing of waste paint from trade and domestic sources across the country.

The National Waste Paint Implementation Working Group has completed the scheme’s business plan, economic model, 5-year rollout strategy and engagement plan and voted unanimously to support an application to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) for approval of the levy. Assuming a favourable assessment by the ACCC against the Competition and Consumer Act, the scheme is expected to commence in May 2016.

The GlobalPSC and several of our members have helped facilitate development of the scheme since Australia’s Environment Ministers agreed to place paint stewardship on their work plan in April 2013 and the Environment Minister’s June 2013 nomination of paint as a priority product under the Product Stewardship Act 2011.

In conjunction with Sustainability Victoria and the Australian Paint Manufacturers’ Federation, the GlobalPSC facilitated initial stakeholder discussions, featured paint and batteries in a priority product stewardship workshop and developed the public policy and business case for a voluntary paint stewardship approach in Australia. Further details and primary documents are available on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members.

 

Dana Peterson Appointed to GlobalPSC Advisory Group

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:20 pm, May 21st, 2015Comments1

17979_GPSC_ADVISORY POWERPOINT SLIDE_FEB15We are proud to announce the appointment of an esteemed colleague, Dana Peterson, to the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

The GlobalPSC and a number of our Executive Committee members have worked closely with Dana over the years, and she brings a wealth of experience to this new role on our Advisory Group.

Dana is a Senior Analyst with New Zealand’s Ministry for the Environment. She has been actively involved in promoting sustainability and resource efficiency in a variety of government roles since 1984. In 2012-2013 she was the government representative in two stakeholder-led product stewardship working parties, the Agrichemicals Review and Tyrewise, and in 2014 was the principal author of government’s public discussion document Priority Waste Streams for Product Stewardship Intervention. She has presented at a number of international conferences on product stewardship and sustainable procurement in Europe and Asia, and served as New Zealand’s representative on an OECD environmental management country review of Norway (focus on waste). At home, she does hands-on organic farming and native forest regeneration on 10 acres on the Kapiti Coast.

 

New Zealand Feedback on Priority Waste Streams

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:22 pm, April 30th, 2015Comments1

The New Zealand Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has released a summary of submissions on its discussion paper on the prioritisation of waste streams for product stewardship intervention.

Stakeholders generally agreed with the MfE’s criteria for prioritisation but suggested weighting ‘risk of harm’ and ‘resource efficiency’ higher than other criteria. Stakeholders also generally agreed with the MfE’s proposed priority products (electronic and electrical equipment; tyres; agrichemicals and farm plastics; and refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases), but recommended adding packaging and plastic bags for prioritisation.

Mike Mendonca of the MfE (pictured below) announced the summary’s release and reviewed its findings during the recent WasteMINZ Roundup in Auckland, which emphasised product stewardship. In a session with Mike and WasteMINZ Board Chair Darren Patterson, GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin outlined overseas developments in product stewardship and their implications for New Zealand.

GlobalPSC Advisory Group members Helen Lewis of Helen Lewis Research and John Gertsakis of Infoactiv were also active participants in the Roundup discussions, as was Paul-Antoine Bontinck of the Vinyl Council of Australia.

Public consultations on priority products opened in May 2014.  The GlobalPSC submission developed in conjunction with our Advisory Group is available to GlobalPSC members via our Knowledge Base, under the Frameworks and Harmonisation heading.

 

Calls for Handheld Battery EPR in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC at 8:01 pm, February 9th, 2015Comments1

The Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) is calling for producer responsibility legislation for household batteries. ABRI has written to The Hon Greg Hunt, Australia’s Minister for the Environment, asking the government to investigate co-regulation (equivalent to extended producer responsibility, or EPR) for handheld batteries.

ABRI notes the varying levels of support for voluntary and regulatory approaches, plus the recent efforts of the U.S.-based Corporation for Battery Recycling (including three of the largest single-use battery manufacturers) to work with other stakeholders to develop the Model Consumer Battery Stewardship Act. A media release regarding ABRI’s effort is available here.

Australia’s Battery Implementation Working Group (BIWG) was established in late 2013 to develop a framework for a national battery product stewardship approach. Environment Ministers had stated that their preference was for a voluntary approach. Handheld batteries had also been designated as priority products for product stewardship. Research commissioned by the BIWG shows a recycling rate of only 2.7 per cent. Background research and BIWG recommendations for a voluntary approach are available here.

“ABRI would have preferred to see a voluntary battery stewardship scheme established in Australia, but our focus is now on building an appropriate regulatory framework. We are confident that this can be done in a way that meets everyone’s needs,” Helen Lewis, ABRI’s CEO (and member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group) told the GlobalPSC.

 

Emphasis on Product Stewardship in New Zealand

Posted by GlobalPSC at 1:05 pm, July 17th, 2014Comments0

Product stewardship is clearly a hot topic of discussion in New Zealand, as reflected in the latest issue of revolve, published by WasteMINZ.

In the issue, WasteMINZ CEO Paul Evans weighs in on likely impacts of the Environment Minister’s recent release of a discussion document on priority waste streams for product stewardship intervention, and further detail is given on the potential designation of priority products.

John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer of Infoactiv,  also reflects upon the need for life cycle benefits to drive ‘product stewardship 2.0′.

Check out revolve for further information.

Australian Report Shows Low Handheld Battery Recycling Rate

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:15 pm, July 14th, 2014Comments2

 

Batteries cr1Australia has today released a material flow analysis showing that handheld batteries are being recycled at a rate of only 2.7 per cent.

 

Approximately 400 million handheld batteries weighing 5kg or less were sold in Australia in 2012-13. For the same time period, 14,703 tonnes of batteries were disposed of and 403 tonnes were collected for recycling. Recovery rates for sealed lead acid, nickel cadmium, lithium primary and nickel metal hydride batteries were all in the 4.4 – 5.5 per cent range, while the recovery rate for alkaline and zinc carbon batteries was estimated at 1.6 per cent.

Batteries were collected through different channels including commercial collections (139 tonnes), retail store drop-off (111 tonnes), e-waste collections (45 tonnes), household hazardous waste collections (16 tonnes) and other recovery routes (91 tonnes). The rest (14,345 tonnes) were disposed to landfill.

On a unit number basis, 90 per cent of the batteries sales proposed to be subject to the Australian product stewardship scheme are single‐use batteries and 10% are rechargeable batteries. On a weight basis, 50% are single‐use and 50% are rechargeable.

Consumption trends indicate that lithium ion batteries will continue to grow as a proportion of all battery sales, increasing from around 24 per cent in 2013 to 33 per cent in 2020.

The report, ‘Study into market share and stocks and flows of handheld batteries in Australia’, was commissioned by the Battery Implementation Working Group (BIWG) on behalf of Australian governments to assist in developing a national battery product stewardship scheme for Australia. Environment Ministers agreed on the need to include end-of-life handheld batteries and waste paint in the Standing Council on Environment and Water’s work plan. The Australian Government identified handheld batteries as priority products potentially covered under Australia’s Product Stewardship Act in 2013 and reaffirmed their designation in 2014.

Sustainable Resource Use (SRU), in association with Perchards Ltd and Sagis Ltd, conducted the work to provide an evidence base to inform the work of the BIWG.

The report is available to GlobalPSC members in the Knowledge Base, under the Batteries tab.

 

New Zealand Priority Waste Streams for Product Stewardship

Posted by GlobalPSC at 4:34 pm, June 2nd, 2014Comments0

New Zealand’s Minister for the Environment, the Hon Amy Adams MP, released a discussion paper on potential prioritisation for product stewardship under New Zealand’s Waste Minimisation Act 2008 (WMA). The Minister’s media release is available here.

The discussion paper released raises the possibility and rationale for designating some or all of the following four products as priority products under the WMA:

  • electrical and electronic equipment (commonly referred to as e-waste or WEEE)
  • tyres
  • agricultural chemicals and farm plastics
  • refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases.

Consultation will be open until 2 July 2014. Detail on consultation workshops in NZ is available here. Following the consultation, the costs and benefits of a range of options and additional stakeholder input will be considered.

New Zealand’s focus has traditionally been on voluntary product stewardship approaches, and 11 voluntary product stewardship schemes have been accredited to date. An overview of the accredited schemes in included in the discussion paper.

NZ_Priority_Waste_Streams_Discussion_Paper_0514_EN

GlobalPSC Seeks Member Views for Product Stewardship Policy Submissions

Posted by GlobalPSC at 10:37 pm, May 27th, 2014Comments2

The Global Product Stewardship Council is seeking the views of active GlobalPSC members to assist in the preparation of public submissions addressing proposed product stewardship policies in New Zealand and Nova Scotia. The GlobalPSC is also seeking Expressions of Interest from active GlobalPSC members for nomination to a GlobalPSC Advisory Group to provide direct input on GlobalPSC content and policies, including the planned submissions.

New Zealand has released a discussion paper on potential prioritisation for product stewardship under New Zealand’s Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and opened consultation until 2 July 2014.

Nova Scotia has flagged possible product stewardship / extended producer responsibility for 24 product categories as part of proposed changes to the provincial solid waste regulations and opened consultation until 11 July 2014. 

until 2 July 2014.
Consultation will be open until 2 July 2014.

Members are asked to email their views on the New Zealand and Nova Scotia discussion papers to the GlobalPSC by 10 June in order to allow time for compilation and drafting. Expressions of Interest for the Advisory Group are also welcome by 10 June, comprising brief biographies and interest in product stewardship not exceeding 800 words. Advisory Group members must be active GlobalPSC members, either as individuals or as part of a member organisation. Information on membership categories, benefits and registration is available here.

Contact GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin with any questions or comments.

New Zealand Opens Consultation on Product Stewardship Priorities

Posted by GlobalPSC at 3:36 pm, May 21st, 2014Comments1

Today New Zealand’s Minister for the Environment, the Hon Amy Adams MP, released a discussion paper on potential prioritisation for product stewardship under New Zealand’s Waste Minimisation Act 2008 (WMA). The Minister’s media release is available here.

The discussion paper released today raises the possibility and rationale for designating some or all of the following four products as priority products under the WMA:

  • electrical and electronic equipment (commonly referred to as e-waste or WEEE)
  • tyres
  • agricultural chemicals and farm plastics
  • refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases.

Consultation will be open until 2 July 2014. Detail on consultation workshops in NZ is available here. Following the consultation, the costs and benefits of a range of options and additional stakeholder input will be considered.

New Zealand’s focus has traditionally been on voluntary product stewardship approaches, and 11 voluntary product stewardship schemes have been accredited to date. An overview of the accredited schemes in included in the discussion paper.

 

GlobalPSC Priority Product Stewardship Workshop Presentations Available

Posted by GlobalPSC at 5:50 pm, November 25th, 2013Comments4

On 18 November 2013 in Port Melbourne, Australia, the GlobalPSC brought global leaders on product-specific producer responsibility collection and reprocessing initiatives together to help identify and learn from international best practice to assist Australia’s efforts to develop national product stewardship approaches for batteries, paint and other materials. Featured international speakers included:

• Carl Smith, CEO and President, Call2Recycle (North America)
• Alison Keane, Vice President Government Affairs, American Coatings Association, on behalf of PaintCare
• Mark Kurschner, President, Product Care Association (North America)
• Corinne Faure-Rochu, Director Business Development, Recupyl (France)

An interactive panel session included these speakers and other product-specific experts on batteries and paint from the USA, UK and Australia. Full program and details are available here. A special evening function sponsored by the GlobalPSC, Sustainability Victoria and Infoactiv provided even greater access to this international line-up for GlobalPSC members.

Thanks to our speakers, sponsors and supporters, we were able to make attendance free for GlobalPSC members in proportion to their membership level.

Presentations from the workshop have been provided to attendees and are now available on the Knowledge Base available to GlobalPSC members under the Programs category in addition to being searchable in the Knowledge Base.

 

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9489 8851
Fax: +61 2 9489 8553
Email: info@globalpsc.net